Decorate/dry/bag And Freeze???

Baking By SueW Updated 28 Apr 2008 , 5:31pm by sicookie

SueW Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:17am
post #1 of 6

I am in a bit of a panic. I had a friend of a friend ask me to do 2 dozen cookies for her daughter's b-day BUT the day she needed them for is the day I come back from vacation thumbsdown.gif I didn't want to turn down that business so I told her I'd decorate them, let them dry, bag them then freeze them and all she had to do was defrost in the bag next week when she needs them. Problem is.......... I am not sure that is true icon_eek.gif Can I freeze NFSC with Antonia's royal then freeze them in the bag with tie??? Will they be OK in a week for the party??? I should have found out the answer before I said yes icon_cry.gif

Also it is a 3 inch cookie so I was going to charge 3 $ a cookie plus .50 to bag each one, is that right. icon_confused.gif

5 replies
sicookie Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:25am
post #2 of 6

yes, you can bake, decorate, bag and freeze. Just make sure they are DRY before you freeze them and when your friend defrosts them, just have her defrost them in the original packaging on the counter. I put mine in a tupperware then leave the tupperware on the sitting out on the counter unopened. As far as the pricing goes, that seems in line with what I've read on this site. I'm doing my first paid job myself this week. for a 3 in. communion cross, I charged $2.50 and .50 to wrap.

SueW Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 4:12am
post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by trish128

yes, you can bake, decorate, bag and freeze. Just make sure they are DRY before you freeze them and when your friend defrosts them, just have her defrost them in the original packaging on the counter. I put mine in a tupperware then leave the tupperware on the sitting out on the counter unopened. As far as the pricing goes, that seems in line with what I've read on this site. I'm doing my first paid job myself this week. for a 3 in. communion cross, I charged $2.50 and .50 to wrap.




Thanks trish128, I feel so much better now about freezing them. I was just talking to my DH about pricing and of course I want to go lower than he thinks I should. The problem is I never discussed pricing with her before she "hired" me so now I feel bad slapping her with an 85 $ bill for 24 cookies. I think I will forgo the wrapping charge this time since it's my fault I didn't discuss pricing.

onceuponacookie Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 4:30am
post #4 of 6

SueW, I have done this several times with no problems at all!

As for your pricing I just quoted somebody $2.50 for two three inch cross's in bags tied with satin ribbon and I never heard back from her again. For me since I to am just starting out, pricing is the hardest part.

AgentCakeBaker Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:28pm
post #5 of 6

I've stored my wrapped cookies in a large container for up to two weeks and they were still delicious once we finally ate them.

Pricing will always be the hardest once you first start out. When I first started selling cookies, I had two co-workers tell me that $1.50 per cookie was too much. The only time they would buy cookies from me was when I ran a holiday special. However, I did have a customer who paid me $1.50 per cookie for 3" or 4" cookies and she needed 4 dozen. She was happy to pay me over $70.

I am going to increase my prices this year but you will still have those who are willing to pay vs. those who won't. Those who won't will see that your price is cheaper b/c there are plenty of private owned bakeries that will charge at least $4 per cookie.

sicookie Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 5:31pm
post #6 of 6

I think the problem lies in the large orders. Somebody asked me to do a christening. She needed 75-80 cookies. At $3.00/cookie that's $225. And believe me, I live in an area that doen't blink twice to spend that kind of money, but I think for cookies it seems pricey. If it were me, I'd have a hard time spending that kind of money for cookies, but if I were just getting 10-20, that would seem more reasonable. Go figure.

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