Help! Cold Cake, Soggy Bc... Ok To Fondant?

Decorating By chillysmommy Updated 28 Apr 2008 , 3:02pm by MacsMom

chillysmommy Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 3:03am
post #1 of 11

Hey there. I am going to cover a cake in fondant. But didn't have time to do everything in one sitting. So, I put the cake in the fridge. Put the buttercream in a bowl in the fridge, until I had time to finish. Now the cake is cold, the BC is hard & separated (used Martha Stewart recipe). When I put a fork through it to try to whip it, it just started getting soggy at the bottom. I used it anyway over the cold cake and it just doesn't look right. Do I need to wait until everything comes to room temperature in order to put the fondant on top, or does the moisture even matter. Can I leave everything out on the counter to warm up overnight and then work it in the morning, or will the buttercream go bad??? HELP, SOMEONE!

10 replies
JenniferMI Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 7:45pm
post #2 of 11

Never used that recipe, but if I couldn't whip it back into shape, I wouldn't use it.

Jen

jsmith Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 7:54pm
post #3 of 11

I'm not sure about your buttercream recipe but if you cover the cake with fondant while the cake is still cold and there's condensation on it you'll get a huge blowout that will ruin your design. Wait until the cake is room temp to cover the cake. But that also depends on if your buttercream or filling is perishable. Maybe you could post the recipe?

chillysmommy Posted 27 Apr 2008 , 8:56pm
post #4 of 11

I let the BC come to room temp and it did whip back up, whew! But the cake was still cold and so it just globbed on. The I let that come back to close to room temp and kind of mixed up the cream that I tried to put on there earlier, right on the cake. It turned out ok, but a little sloppy.

The fondant worked out ok, but it was kind of tough. I really wanted to make it from scratch but without ever doing it before, and because the cake was needed the next morning, I just bought the Wilton brand stuff. Rolling it took a while and my arms are really sore. The flavor wasn't that great and pretty much everyone just pushed it to the side. I'm assuming that's not a good thing. Is it supposed to be a little tough, or is it supposed to be a consistency of like a stiff cream icing?

Sorry if I'm being really naive. I've just never done or even eaten fondant before, but I've always liked it's look. Thanks for your replies! This place is great!

FromScratch Posted 27 Apr 2008 , 9:21pm
post #5 of 11

Fondant is like play-doh.. it's supposed to have substance to it. The wilton fondant tastes like crap and is definitely NOT a good thing. Next time you should try making your own.. I like this recipe from here on CC:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-3663-1-Michele-Fosters-Delicious-Fondant.html

It is some of the lest fondant I have ever worked with.

I'm betting that the buttercream you were using was a meringue type buttercream and they MUST be room temp beofre you whip them up or you get the soupy cottage cheese thing going on. It will come together though (as you found out) if you keep whipping it or you can do what I do.. I take my culinary torch and heat the outside of the bowl to make it happen faster because I am impatient. icon_lol.gif Just run the flame all over the mixer bowl and it will warm it up so it comes together.

MacsMom Posted 27 Apr 2008 , 9:57pm
post #6 of 11

I always put fondant on a cold cake so the cake remains firm enough as I'm smoothing. A thick BC is best under fondant because you don't want it to squish around as your smoothing the fondant. I keep my cakes in the fridge at all time between decorating - it does develop condensation but it dries perfectly. In fact, I like the condensation as it helps embellishments adhere to the cake!

I haven't tried Michelle Foster's fondant recipe yet, but I am totally happy with my MMF recipe:

16 oz MMs
2 lb powdered sugar
2 T water
(melt in micro about 1 min 20 secs in Crisco coated bowl, stir with crisco coated spatula)
ADD
1 t salt
1 T glycerine or corn syrup
1 dram of LoRann butter flavor or 2 t Nielsen Massey chocolate extract (I have found these two to give the best flavor - not too sweet)

The salt cuts the sweetness, the glycerine aids pliability. Knead as much of the PS in as you can, it shouldn't stick to your hands when enough has been kneaded in.

You have to let it rest a few hours, then soften it again in the microwave for a few seconds, and knead. The salt may cause a pock-marked look before kneading, but it disappears instantly once kneaded.

cupsncakes Posted 27 Apr 2008 , 11:33pm
post #7 of 11

Another tip, in winter when my fondant is a bit stiff and hard to roll, I wrap it in plastic and put it in the microwave on a low setting for about 30 seconds at a time until it is easier to manage.

chillysmommy Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 12:53pm
post #8 of 11

You guys are the best! Thanks for all the tips. And yes, I did use a meringue type BC frosting (soupy cottage cheese). And YES, the Wilton doesn't taste that good and I will definitely be making it from scratch next time!

Thanks again!

FromScratch Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 12:57pm
post #9 of 11

No problem.. I use SMBC allt he time so I am all too familliar with the "Oh no I whipped it up too soon" look it gets. The beauty of the meringue based BC's is they just magically come back together no matter how gross they look in the process. If you don't have a culinary torch you can place the bowl over a pot of boiling water to facilitate the coming back together. icon_smile.gif

Good luck with your next cake!!

chillysmommy Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 1:22pm
post #10 of 11

Here's a pic of the sloppy cake. It was the first character cake I've done, but I wish it was a lot better. I have a hard time with amateur looking things, even if it is my first time! Thanks again for your help!
LL

MacsMom Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:02pm
post #11 of 11

What an adorable cake! You wouldn't know what you went through to create it icon_smile.gif

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