Just Finished 1St Wedding Cake...questions.

Decorating By CharmingConfections Updated 29 Apr 2008 , 7:40pm by plbennett_8

CharmingConfections Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 12:35am
post #1 of 17

Ok, so this was my first wedding cake, and I came across some issues. The bottom tier was 16" (the largest size that would fit in my oven). I had trouble lifting the second layer onto the first... what do you use to help lift and stack such large layers?

My fondant also craked a little when I stacked the tiers.. do you keep your tiers covered until you stack them to prevent them from getting too dry and the fondant cracking? Then would you wait to put the floral border until it was all stacked?
Any tips or pointers would be really appreciated! I am doing another friends wedding cake next weekend and it is basically the same cake.

Thank You!!!
CC
LL

16 replies
butterflywings Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 12:39am
post #2 of 17

first, let me say your cake is really pretty. is that a stencil or piping design on the sides? its beautiful.

now, for getting the 2nd layer on a large cake -- there are several different brands of "cake lifters" out on the market, but i don't know if any would be big enough for 16" cake -- do a google search. i've seen them on amazon, wilton & target's web sites.

i don't really have a suggestion for the cracking fondant other than to ask if you 1) might have rolled it too thin? and 2) you could try rubbing a little shortening on your fingertips and then over the fondant to soften it a little and to help prevent cracking (this would be after you have it on the cake)

KoryAK Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 1:57am
post #3 of 17

If your dowels are the proper height (exactly the same as cake and icing), then the fondant shouldn't be smooshed at all therefore no cracking. I, too, would like to know about the side design of the cake - its gorgeous!

aligotmatt Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 2:06am
post #4 of 17

I use sheet cake boards when I do 16" cakes. I buy a lot and slide each layer onto its own board.

As for the fondant... lightly massage it with crisco and then keep it lightly wrapped as much as possible, It will naturally dry out and the more movement will cause cracks. Also, any bubbles left under your fondant will cause cracks.

Melvira Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 2:15am
post #5 of 17

Oh my yes, that is gorgeous, especially for your first wedding cake! Nothing like hitting the ground running!!

When I am stacking large tiers like that I use a 'pizza/cake' lifter. They usually come in 12" size, but there are smaller, maybe bigger. But 12" works really well for lifting a 16" cake... you just have a little 'overhang' but not enough to cause damage usually. You can also use a cake board to pick it up and slide it on... I did that before investing in the lifter.

HTH!!
LL

CharmingConfections Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 3:59am
post #6 of 17

Wow, thanks for the compliments, & thanks for the great info! I have a little pizza lifter from Pampered Chef that I got my husband a few years back, its actually two you slide together, but Maybe I will give that a try, or the cake boards... Maybe the cracking will get better the more of these I do - I will get better at making everything just so.

The side design is a stencil - I made it myself. At Michael's they sell the material to make your own stencil; the thick plastic and a swivel exacto knife. And I am a graphic designer so I made the pattern in a design program and printed it out and then traced it onto the stencil sheet and cut it out. I don't think the stencil plastic was quite thick enough and I had some shifting, so my stencil smudged in some spots. I tried freehand piping one side, but I think the stencil looked nicer. I wish I could find a premade stencil that would fit and was the design I was looking for.

Anyway, thanks everyong!!!
CC

mjballinger Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 4:14am
post #7 of 17

I agree, the cake is beautiful. It's funny that I just read this post, as I am sitting at my desk filing away all the flyers and such I got at the Mid Atlantic Cake Show. There was a booth there was gorgeous stencils, and they will even custom make them for you - the prices seem reasonable, considering the cost you can charge for wedding cakes. The website is www.culinarystencils.com

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 4:46am
post #8 of 17

what a beautiful gorgeous cake! congrats!

MegWinn Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 5:16am
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjballinger

I agree, the cake is beautiful. It's funny that I just read this post, as I am sitting at my desk filing away all the flyers and such I got at the Mid Atlantic Cake Show. There was a booth there was gorgeous stencils, and they will even custom make them for you - the prices seem reasonable, considering the cost you can charge for wedding cakes. The website is www.culinarystencils.com





mjballinger - thank you for this link! What a great resource to know about.

adunfag Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 5:34am
post #10 of 17

Great job on your cake. Consider this one a little practice for the one you have to do nest weekend.

loriemoms Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 5:38am
post #11 of 17

As far as stacking, I use a large spacula to slice the cake in place.

I agree with the other posts..either your dowels were too short or you didnt knead your fondant enough. While you are kneading it, watch the edges as you 'bend it" they should be smooth adn pliable. If there are little cracks and such, your fondant isn't ready yet..

It is a GEORGOUS cake!

beachcakes Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 5:57pm
post #12 of 17

For large layers, I like to freeze a few hours until solid. Much easier to move/position.

doitallmom Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 7:39pm
post #13 of 17

Nice cake, Love the design! Good luck with the lifting issue- I have yet to find a solution (besides using my DH) so I'll be watching this thread!

vixterfsu Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 7:54pm
post #14 of 17

I have foam board (Thin) of all sizes covered with
Contact paper and the whatever gets on them I wipe off.

Emmerdoo Posted 29 Apr 2008 , 6:49pm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by vixterfsu

I have foam board (Thin) of all sizes covered with
Contact paper and the whatever gets on them I wipe off.





I have never once thought to use foam board with contact paper as I have always used cake boards. Thanks for the idea vixter

Happy Caking Ya'll,

Em

MeMo07 Posted 29 Apr 2008 , 7:36pm
post #16 of 17

Beautiful cake!!!! icon_smile.gif

plbennett_8 Posted 29 Apr 2008 , 7:40pm
post #17 of 17

The largest that I have dealt with is a 14"... I move them frozen or well chilled, and I use a large no side cookie sheet. Works great! I saw early about spraying it with a little no stick spray...what a good idea! Why don't I ever think of those kinds of things... icon_rolleyes.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%