Ladies,how Much Do You Charge For These Type Of Sizes?

Business By cerobs Updated 26 Apr 2008 , 2:33pm by kelleym

cerobs Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 7:23pm
post #1 of 6

9x13 sheet
11x14 sheet

3in pan round and the same for sq.
6,8.10,12,14

5 replies
indydebi Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 1:10am
post #2 of 6

if you search the business forum for pricing, you will find a huge collection of threads with suggestions and ranges on pricing.

you might start with this one .... http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-584066.html

FromScratch Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 1:03pm
post #3 of 6

The first thing you have to do is set your standard serving chart. Then once you have that ironed out you can knock out a per servings price. I don't use the 3" pans.. they don't comply with the standard serving size where the cake is 4" tall (if you made two 3" layers it'd be 6" tall or if you only baked one layer it'd be a little short). You could bake 2"layers in your 3" pans though. I like 2" pans because they make it easy.

The most important thing to do is to set your servings and stick with them. Then it's easy to figure out prices. You can call around to local bakeries (not grocery stores or Wal*Mart) and see what prices are like for dustom cakes in your area. I charge $4/serv for buttercream and $5/serving for fondant.

For me.. I set an 8" round cake at 20 servings.. a 10" round cake at 30 servings.. a 12" round at 50 servings. So when someone calls I can say "You need cake for 25 people.. I can make a 10" cake than can serve 30 and it will cost you $120 covered in buttercream or $150 covered in fondant."

Trixyinaz Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 1:25pm
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman


The most important thing to do is to set your servings and stick with them....

For me.. I set an 8" round cake at 20 servings.. a 10" round cake at 30 servings.. a 12" round at 50 servings. So when someone calls I can say "You need cake for 25 people.. I can make a 10" cake than can serve 30 and it will cost you $120 covered in buttercream or $150 covered in fondant."




What size pieces are those? Do you tell your customer? Here is my fear...I tell someone that xx cake can serve 50 people (1x2x4 slices) b/c they want to serve 40 people, but they cut the cake in party size slices and run out of cake icon_redface.gif For this last order, she wanted a double layer 9x13. She only had 25 people, but wanted that size cake. I used IndyDebi's serving chart and said, here's how you cut it if you want 54 slices, 40 slices, etc. Do you guys go that far in explaining stuff?

FromScratch Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 1:37pm
post #5 of 6

God no.. I tell them the cake is designed to serve X amount of servings and I base my prices on the wedding serving. I don't say "up to X amount of servings". I once thought about having different pricing options for wedding and party sized servings, but it was silly.. because the party sized servings were more expensive (due to there being 50% more cake) and it would just confuse the customer. I think we over think this stuff. Too many options confuse people and give them ammo to make us cave in. "Oh.. but you said it can serve as little as 40.. so why are you charging for 50?"

An 8" cake yields 20 wedding servings and I base my pricing on that standard size. I have no problem telling them that the cake could serve 2 people if they wanted but they pay for the amount of servings the cake is designed to serve. They get instructions on how to cut their cake to assure the proper amount of servings. How they cut it once they get it home is not my problem. icon_smile.gif If they have 25 people to feed cake but they want a cake that can feed 50.. they pay for 50.

My slices are about 1x2x4. I just like round numbers.. and that way there is a little extra cake so they will definitely get their servings out of it. I charge enough per serving to cover the couple less servings. icon_smile.gif

kelleym Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 2:33pm
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trixyinaz

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman


The most important thing to do is to set your servings and stick with them....

For me.. I set an 8" round cake at 20 servings.. a 10" round cake at 30 servings.. a 12" round at 50 servings. So when someone calls I can say "You need cake for 25 people.. I can make a 10" cake than can serve 30 and it will cost you $120 covered in buttercream or $150 covered in fondant."



What size pieces are those? Do you tell your customer? Here is my fear...I tell someone that xx cake can serve 50 people (1x2x4 slices) b/c they want to serve 40 people, but they cut the cake in party size slices and run out of cake icon_redface.gif For this last order, she wanted a double layer 9x13. She only had 25 people, but wanted that size cake. I used IndyDebi's serving chart and said, here's how you cut it if you want 54 slices, 40 slices, etc. Do you guys go that far in explaining stuff?




This is why I like Earlene's chart. I do a lot more party cakes than wedding cakes, and I feel that Earlene's slices, which are approx. 1"x2.5"x4", are what a person would logically cut at a party. I do give all my customers a cutting chart with the cake.

The problem with asking questions like "everybody tell me what you charge for these sizes" is that the prices for cakes are largely determined by local markets. So asking us CC'ers all over the world what to charge is kind of like saying "Hey guys, I have a 1600 square foot, 3 bedroom 2 bath house in a nice neighborhood - how much should I list it for?" Nobody here can tell you for sure because every market is different.
That is why it's so important to 1) call around to other custom bakeries and find out what their going rates per serving are, and 2) know your own ingredient and supply costs. You simply can't know how much to charge unless you know how much the product costs you - and the cost of ingredients can vary wildly depending on where you live, or even where you shop! My costs can go up 20% or more if I shop at Randall's instead of HEB or Costco.

More thoughts here. icon_smile.gif

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