Level Cakes Before Freezing Or After???

Decorating By becklynn Updated 29 Apr 2008 , 1:17am by CarolAnn

becklynn Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 9:46pm
post #1 of 28

I usually level my cakes in the pan with a long knife. I have to freeze some cakes for an upcoming event (or I might tear my hair out!) Is it OK to level the cake, then freeze? Or should I freeze first, then level it after it thaws?? Thanks for any tips!!

27 replies
oliveoyle Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 10:30pm
post #2 of 28

It perfectly fine to level your cales before you freeze them, just mke sure ypu wrap them really well before freezing,whether you level them first or not HTH icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 12:47am
post #3 of 28

i level then freeze....that way they are ready to go straight from the freezer, if I have to.

beachcakes Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 1:26am
post #4 of 28

I agree, level then freeze. Saves alot of time when you're ready to decorate!

wgoat5 Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 3:43am
post #5 of 28

Level and freeze here also icon_smile.gif (when I have to freeze)

all4cake Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 3:54am
post #6 of 28

I, too, level and freeze. Not only does it save time, it also allows for them to be stacked neatly without the fear that the hump will crack the layer above.

cakebaker1957 Posted 27 Apr 2008 , 8:23pm
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

i level then freeze....that way they are ready to go straight from the freezer, if I have to.




Indydebi
can you torte your cakes while there still frozen or would you let them thaw first?
Thanks

indydebi Posted 27 Apr 2008 , 9:22pm
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakebaker1957

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

i level then freeze....that way they are ready to go straight from the freezer, if I have to.



Indydebi
can you torte your cakes while there still frozen or would you let them thaw first?
Thanks




I dont' tort wedding cakes, however I DO tort my 3x3x2 sample cakes before freezing.

cakebaker1957 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 12:56pm
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakebaker1957

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

i level then freeze....that way they are ready to go straight from the freezer, if I have to.



Indydebi
can you torte your cakes while there still frozen or would you let them thaw first?
Thanks



I dont' tort wedding cakes, however I DO tort my 3x3x2 sample cakes before freezing.




Would it be ok if i did i mean if you use 3in cake pans ?? and im thinking of torting the Grooms cakes, and making different fillings in each one, usually i dont torte at all but im wanting more icing in the fillings?? Thanks for responding i love CC there the only group i can actually feel im getting good info from

Bonnie151 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 12:58pm
post #10 of 28

I bake my cakes, then let them sit for 12 hours to settle, then level and torte them, and then freeze.

cakebaker1957 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 1:07pm
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie151

I bake my cakes, then let them sit or 12 hours to settle, then level and torte them, and then freeze.




Would it still work i have already frozen them i will take them out Wed night can i still torte while there frozen or should i let them thaw
Thanks

CarolAnn Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 1:20pm
post #12 of 28

I bake then invert (in pan) onto cooling rack, if there's a dome, for about an hour. After cooling I level, tort if I'm going to, wrap and freeze. If I'm going to use it the same day I just return it to the pan, cover with plastic and refrigerate or leave it out.

I have found that trying to tort a frozen cake is asking for a big headache.

arosstx Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 1:21pm
post #13 of 28

you can cut them frozen but it's tough because they are so firm. I almost cut a finger off trying to do it that way, so now I'm a "level then freeze" gal!

Another great plus of that method is when your cakes come out of the freezer, they are ready to go and you're not making yet another crumby mess by having to cut them. The fewer crumbs around, the less chance of them getting in your buttercream! icon_smile.gif

cakebaker1957 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 1:29pm
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by arosstx

you can cut them frozen but it's tough because they are so firm. I almost cut a finger off trying to do it that way, so now I'm a "level then freeze" gal!

Another great plus of that method is when your cakes come out of the freezer, they are ready to go and you're not making yet another crumby mess by having to cut them. The fewer crumbs around, the less chance of them getting in your buttercream! icon_smile.gif




Well i guess i had better not try to torte them at all i was just wanting more filling inbetween the layers Thanks for all the info

lovetofrost Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 1:44pm
post #15 of 28

I'm glad you asked this question. I always have leveled after freezing. I guess I never thought about it. I will definitely be doing it before now. Thanks gals!

rhopar33 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 1:45pm
post #16 of 28

I always freeze first, then level. No particular reason, I've just always done it that way.

Rhonda

Bonnie151 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 2:02pm
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakebaker1957

Well i guess i had better not try to torte them at all i was just wanting more filling inbetween the layers Thanks for all the info




I'd just let them thaw & then torte if you want more filling. So long as you're not trying to torte them frozen, they'll be fine. I just prefer to do it before freezing because as someone already mentioned, it's much less mess getting the crumbs over & done with in one lot!

cakebaker1957 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 2:21pm
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie151

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakebaker1957

Well i guess i had better not try to torte them at all i was just wanting more filling inbetween the layers Thanks for all the info



I'd just let them thaw & then torte if you want more filling. So long as you're not trying to torte them frozen, they'll be fine. I just prefer to do it before freezing because as someone already mentioned, it's much less mess getting the crumbs over & done with in one lot!




Thanks i will defintaly remember to torte before feezing the next time usually i dont torte but im going to start,

shadow79 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 2:53pm
post #19 of 28

I usually bake, then let cake cool. After that I put in fridge/freezer(wrapped in saran wrap) overnight or for a day, then level, then decorate. I have always leveled after I get out of fridge/freezer because I was worried that if I leveled prior to fridge/freezer that it would dry out since I exposed the inside of the cake. Do you find this to NOT be the case as long as the cake is wrapped well? What is the best method to use when wrapping the cakes for the fridge/freezer. When I put them in the fridge, I usually just put them in my cake saver if they fit.

cakebaker1957 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:04pm
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadow79

I usually bake, then let cake cool. After that I put in fridge/freezer(wrapped in saran wrap) overnight or for a day, then level, then decorate. I have always leveled after I get out of fridge/freezer because I was worried that if I leveled prior to fridge/freezer that it would dry out since I exposed the inside of the cake. Do you find this to NOT be the case as long as the cake is wrapped well? What is the best method to use when wrapping the cakes for the fridge/freezer. When I put them in the fridge, I usually just put them in my cake saver if they fit.




I usually level them after baking i usually level them while there still in the pans (something i learned here icon_lol.gif ) and let them set in the pans for 10min then i turn them out on the rack and cool then i wrap and wrap and wrap in plastic wrap then i wrap them in heavy duty aluminum foil only thing i havent been doing but will from now on is to torte them before i freeze them

lchristi27 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:19pm
post #21 of 28

Someone once said they push down on the cakes with a cakeboard while they are still hot and this levels them? Anyone remember the instructions on that?

I do freeze mine but sometimes wrap it to tightly in saran wrap and it warps the cake, anyone have that problem?

shadow79 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:41pm
post #22 of 28

Just a little tip that helps me that may help someone else out there. After I get my cake out of the oven, I flip it onto a cooling rack. Then I take the pan and set it on top of the the cake (bottom side of the pan down) and place a can of soup in the middle of the pan. The weight of the soup can helps to level the cake. I learned this from the cake course I took a couple years ago, it works like a charm and I usually dont have a lot of leveling to do.

wgoat5 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:49pm
post #23 of 28

You can also (I have done this many times) keep the cake IN the pan (ensures moisture is retained) and flip over.. weigh down.. and voila .. icon_smile.gif Saves you that extra step.. just make sure that it comes at least to the top of the pan even a little above icon_smile.gif

beachcakes Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:52pm
post #24 of 28

Doesn't it squish through the holes in the cooling rack if you weight it down?

wgoat5 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 3:56pm
post #25 of 28

I don't put mine on a cooling rack...

flat on the board most of the time

mommycakediva Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 4:14pm
post #26 of 28

Wow never heard of that, will have to try it soon!

shadow79 Posted 28 Apr 2008 , 4:58pm
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachcakes

Doesn't it squish through the holes in the cooling rack if you weight it down?




I was afraid that it would do this the first time I tried it too, but it doesn't do it any more than if you don't put the pan and the soup can on it!

CarolAnn Posted 29 Apr 2008 , 1:17am
post #28 of 28

Unless I'm leaving the house right after getting a cake out of the oven I turn them out of the pan/pans onto a cooling rack after 15 or so. I don't like to trap the heat in because I think it can make the cake soggy. Inverting them onto the rack lets the weight of the cake to do the leveling. Yes, the warm cake will push into the rack some, but I always put another rack over the cake/cakes and then flip the whole thing over. Then I slowly lift the first rack off the cake tops. It leaves square indentations on my leveled cakes which is easily covered with icing. I wouldn't advise trying to lift inverted cakes off the rack. If it's just one cake you can put the pan back on the cake and flip it over. If there's more than one cake cooling do the second rack thing. That's my method.

I will sometimes level even after doing all of this, when I want to even out my layers or I'm torting. Depends on the plated look I want. Does that make sense?

Most of my pans are 3" deep, and I don't generally fill them to get a 3" layer. I go for a nice uniform 2" most of the time.

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