Instant Read Thermometer To Test Cake?

Decorating By HeatherC Updated 26 Apr 2008 , 6:34am by chestercheeto

HeatherC Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 2:39pm
post #1 of 12

My scratch cakes have been coming out dry, and I think I may be overbaking them. I read an old thread that said you can test to see if a cake is done by checking the internal temperature, but it didn't say what that should be. I do this for my cheesecakes--a cheesecake is done when the internal temperature is 150 to 160 degrees F and will likely crack above 160 F. Does anyone know what temperature a regular cake should be when it is done?

Thanks!

11 replies
Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 12:32pm
post #2 of 12

I don't have an answer, but my guess would be that it depends upon the type of cake. I doubt (though I could be wrong) that each type of cake would be done at the same temp. I'm thinking that there's probably a big difference between, for instance, chocolate cakes and say chiffons.

Hopefully somebody else can tell you. I still use my trusty toothpick when in doubt.


edited to add the last sentence.

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 12:33pm
post #3 of 12

I don't have an answer, but my guess would be that it depends upon the type of cake. I doubt (though I could be wrong) that each type of cake would be done at the same temp. I'm thinking that there's probably a big difference between, for instance, chocolate cakes and say chiffons.

Hopefully somebody else can tell you.

HeatherC Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 1:23pm
post #4 of 12

I take my cakes out of the oven with crumbs still on a wooden skewer. I baked a yellow cake from Baking Illustrated and it came out dry. I made Rebecca Rather's White Buttermilk Cake and the Cake Bible Sour Cream Butter Cake and they came out Dry. I made Scott Wooley's Chocolate Fudge Cake with Toba Garrett's Chocolate Buttercream and the cake was dry and bland (maybe because I used regular Hershey's Cocoa and instant coffee?) but the frosting was so fabulous my husband and I ate the frosting and threw out the cake! Usually we don't eat all the frosting on our plate. I've made 2 WASCs recently and they were both great as always. But I really want to learn to be a good scratch baker! I always try not to overmix but do use a powerful 6 quart Kitchenaid. Anyone have any other suggestions? Thanks!

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 1:58pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeatherC

I take my cakes out of the oven with crumbs still on a wooden skewer. I baked a yellow cake from Baking Illustrated and it came out dry. I made Rebecca Rather's White Buttermilk Cake and the Cake Bible Sour Cream Butter Cake and they came out Dry. I made Scott Wooley's Chocolate Fudge Cake with Toba Garrett's Chocolate Buttercream and the cake was dry and bland (maybe because I used regular Hershey's Cocoa and instant coffee?) but the frosting was so fabulous my husband and I ate the frosting and threw out the cake! Usually we don't eat all the frosting on our plate. I've made 2 WASCs recently and they were both great as always. But I really want to learn to be a good scratch baker! I always try not to overmix but do use a powerful 6 quart Kitchenaid. Anyone have any other suggestions? Thanks!




Have you checked the temp. of your oven? Maybe that's what's throwing your cakes off.

playingwithsugar Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 3:49pm
post #6 of 12

I agree with Grace. Buy a good oven thermometer, and test it at 350 degrees. It sounds like it is running hot.

If it is, you need to have your control knob calibrated.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

peanut123 Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 4:17pm
post #7 of 12

Most cakes are âdoneâ when the internal temperature is between 194° F and 204° F.

chestercheeto Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 11:54pm
post #8 of 12

i'm pretty sure the King Arthur Baking Companion gives temps for several types of cakes. i'll take a look when i get home tonight and let you know what i find.

butterflywings Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 12:35am
post #9 of 12

i've found that a lot of scratch cakes come out dry.. which is why i mostly use doctored box mixes

wgoat5 Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 2:02am
post #10 of 12

You can google these little gadgets probably .. about a year ago my mom brought me over one that a baker friend of hers in Colorado used.. I LOVE it.. although the name is wore off I could get my DM to call her and ask what the name brand is!

But I can tell you this.. when I checked on getting one a couple of years ago the cheapest I found one was 135.00 ... but it is worth every penny I believe!!

ceshell Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 4:45am
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeatherC

I made Rebecca Rather's White Buttermilk Cake and the Cake Bible Sour Cream Butter Cake and they came out Dry. I made Scott Wooley's Chocolate Fudge Cake with Toba Garrett's Chocolate Buttercream and the cake was dry and bland (maybe because I used regular Hershey's Cocoa and instant coffee?) but the frosting was so fabulous my husband and I ate the frosting and threw out the cake!



Goodness me, those are my favorite two cakes (the RR cake and the Choc Fudge cake). Have you tried the Choc Fudge cake w/the egullet modifications? It is seriously the most chocolatey, decadent, amazing cake I've ever eaten. I DO use Callebaut cocoa. I don't use any coffee at all. Try it w/quality cocoa and use this alteration (my post at the top of p.3 of the thread) http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopic-52587-30.html.

I don't have any advice about your general "dry" problem but it looks like you already have a lot of great tips which I get to learn from too thumbs_up.gif . Also there are some good suggestions on ba king 9 11. com, just go to "cakes" and "What Went Wrong?"

chestercheeto Posted 26 Apr 2008 , 6:34am
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by chakkakin

i'm pretty sure the King Arthur Baking Companion gives temps for several types of cakes. i'll take a look when i get home tonight and let you know what i find.




chocolate butter cake
9" round pan
209'F

jelly roll sponge
10x15"
191'F - 194'F

chiffon
9" round
210'F

pound
9x5"
209'F

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