Cake Size Quesion. Please Help =)

Decorating By JMarieSweets Updated 24 Apr 2008 , 8:30pm by TexasSugar

JMarieSweets Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 2:46pm
post #1 of 9

I was asked to make a friends sisters rehearsal dinner cake. Its for approx 70 people. I was also asked what I would charge for this size. My question is, what size pans would I use for bigger than normal serving sizes (they dont want tiny pieces) I have been doing this for family and friends only so most of my cakes havent had to be this big and I dont want to tell her one thing and be wrong. What should I tell her the cost is. She was asking for calalilys as a design

Thank you in advance

8 replies
costumeczar Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 2:54pm
post #2 of 9

Does she want a sheet or something stacked?

FromScratch Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 3:04pm
post #3 of 9

Well my first piece of advice is to charge for the amount of cake they order.. not the amount of servings they want. An 8" cake is designed to serve 20 people.. doesn't mean it can't serve 2 people, but they pay for 20 servings regardless of how many pieces they cut from it.

It really depends on what you want to do with this cake as to the size. You can do a sheetcake or a single round cake or a tiered cake.. do you have an idea of what you are doing or did she ask for anything specific?

kakeladi Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 3:20pm
post #4 of 9

Yep, what they^^^^ saidicon_smile.gif
We really need more information. Do they want a pretty, elegant (a bit more feminine) style or something funny or a groom's cake? Many people are now servings the groom's cake at the rehersal.
You could make a wonkey style; a castle; or a preview of the wedding cake. Or a sheet......soooooo many ways to go. We need more info to help you.

indydebi Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 5:34pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

Well my first piece of advice is to charge for the amount of cake they order.. not the amount of servings they want. An 8" cake is designed to serve 20 people.. doesn't mean it can't serve 2 people, but they pay for 20 servings regardless of how many pieces they cut from it.



Absol-freaking-lutely!

I use the serving chart to determine my pricing, not necessarily to determine number of servings. But jkalman said it perfect!!! You charge for the number of servings the cake is DESIGNED to serve .... not for how many they plan to cut from it.

A cake designed for 20 is getting charged for 20. They are welcome to cut it any dang size they want.

JMarieSweets Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 5:05am
post #6 of 9

Thanks guys. All the mother said was the flavor and that she wanted it to feed 70ish people. I asked what kind of decorations and she said maybe calalilies. Never done those hope they are easy. Anyways she said she'd call back saturday, I just had surgery and wasnt quite there. I had made her daughter a stacked birthday cake and im not sure if thats what she wants or something bigger. Ill give more details when I get them, I just wasnt sure what to "quote" her when she asked how much it would be.

I know I need details, just wasnt sure of what ballpark I should be in. Thank you guys so much for answering.

costumeczar Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 1:49pm
post #7 of 9

Don't feel like you have to give her a quote while she's on the phone...Take her details and tell her you'll work it out and call her back, then you'll have time to think without feeling pressured.

JMarieSweets Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 4:52pm
post #8 of 9

I dont do many cakes, mostly friends and family, I always feel pressured to answer cost questions right away.

TexasSugar Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 8:30pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Don't feel like you have to give her a quote while she's on the phone...Take her details and tell her you'll work it out and call her back, then you'll have time to think without feeling pressured.




I totally agree with this. I hate when someone says, "How much would you charge for a cake?" And expect an answer with out me knowing what kind of cake we are talking about.

Get the details of what she wants, then sit down and figure out how much it is going to cost you to make. If you don't know how much you spend how can you know how much you need to make to cover that and your time.

I would also find out what size they think is tiny and what they thing is a 'good' size. That is pretty subjective. But don't forget like was said, they pay for the amount of cake they get, not how many servings they are going to cut from it.

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