Cream Instead Of Milk

Decorating By goofygirly36 Updated 24 Apr 2008 , 1:33am by goofygirly36

goofygirly36 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 11:40pm
post #1 of 14

can i substitute cream for milk? and do i substitute exactly?


TIA

13 replies
julzs71 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 11:46pm
post #2 of 14

can you substitute breast milk? just joking! What are you making. I think you could, maybe water it down.

goddessa12 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 11:48pm
post #3 of 14

I've made buttercream with cream instead of milk when i wass already started before i realized i was out .... everyone loved it, it was the richest and smoothest buttercream i've ever done

FromScratch Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 12:04am
post #4 of 14

If I make american style buttercream I use heavy cream too.

Now if it's in a cake recipe.. you might not want to as the fat content is a lot higher in the cream.

allydav Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 1:14am
post #5 of 14

In frosting I always substitute cream for milk. Makes a world of a difference! I substitute exact amounts, but then again I just add cream until the consistincy is right.

costumeczar Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 3:38pm
post #6 of 14

If you're talking about baking you can't substitute the exact amount, but you can blend part cream with part milk. Depending on the recipe it will give you a softer texture than using whole milk alone, but that's because cream has a much higher percentage of fat, so the fat will soften your cake's texture. I had a couple of recipes that I thought were too dry, so I do half milk and half cream when it calls for only milk, and it makes the texture better.

For icing, just go for it! Add as much cream as you need to get the right consistency.

goofygirly36 Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 10:58pm
post #7 of 14

putting it in icing sounds YUMMY! but do i have to refrigerate it? i thought i read somewhere that the sugar neutralizes the milks or something so that you dont REALLY have to refrigerate.....

will the cream and milk mixture give that spongelike texture? where you can "hear" the water in the cake? do you know what i mean? some really fancy bakeries have this really dense wet cake and i LOVE that.....

aligotmatt Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 11:08pm
post #8 of 14

In Sarah's Red Velvet Cake, I use heavy whipping cream instead of buttermilk, every time I sell it people call afterwards to tell me it was the best rv cake ever!

Also, it's good in frosting, I would refrigerate though. I don't know about sugar neutralizing, but I'm also paranoid about spoilage so I obsess over keeping things cool and what can and can't be used. I won't even make the imbc or smbc because of my paranoia.

wgoat5 Posted 22 Apr 2008 , 10:23am
post #9 of 14

The frosting is ok to leave out for a couple of days but after that I put mine in the fridge when I use that recipe... some love the BC with the heavy cream and some love Sugarshacks icing.. there is no inbetween there lol

aligotmatt Posted 22 Apr 2008 , 12:08pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by wgoat5

The frosting is ok to leave out for a couple of days but after that I put mine in the fridge when I use that recipe... some love the BC with the heavy cream and some love Sugarshacks icing.. there is no inbetween there lol




really? You would leave out frosting that has heavy cream in it for a few days?

FromScratch Posted 22 Apr 2008 , 12:30pm
post #11 of 14

It's more than fine to leave out.. there is so much sugar in it that nothing is going to grow. Sugar is a preservative. There's so little cream in it anyway.. in a recipe with 4lbs of powdered sugar there is 1/4 cup of cream (maybe 1/3c). There's so much fat and sugar in comparison to the amount of cream that you don't have to worry.

costumeczar Posted 22 Apr 2008 , 2:09pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Quote:

will the cream and milk mixture give that spongelike texture? where you can "hear" the water in the cake? do you know what i mean? some really fancy bakeries have this really dense wet cake and i LOVE that.....




I think that might be a soaking syrup, not the cake texture by itself. In European cakes they use a genoise a lot, then you soak it with a soaking syrup that's flavored with whatever liquer or other flavoring you want. The texture of the genoise is really kind of dry and has a tight crumb on its own, but the syrup soaks into it and gives it a softer, wetter texture. I use syrups on some butter cakes depending on the cake texture, just to give it a little more moisture. Pound cakes with a syrup on them would be really dense and have that "wet" kind of texture that you're describing, I think.

wgoat5 Posted 22 Apr 2008 , 3:17pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by aligotmatt

Quote:
Originally Posted by wgoat5

The frosting is ok to leave out for a couple of days but after that I put mine in the fridge when I use that recipe... some love the BC with the heavy cream and some love Sugarshacks icing.. there is no inbetween there lol



really? You would leave out frosting that has heavy cream in it for a few days?




yes sure would, I know SEVERAL bakers on here that use the BC with the heavy cream and they also leave theirs out for a couple of days.. now I don't leave mine out for more then 2 but I don't think it would hurt at 3 or 4 either.

goofygirly36 Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 1:33am
post #14 of 14

in regards to teh soaking.......what do you think would happen if i soaked it for like a few seconds in evaporated milk? would that be yuck? lol

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%