What Is Corn Syrup?

Decorating By lentula Updated 23 Apr 2008 , 2:31am by tracey1970

lentula Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 9:19am
post #1 of 15

Hi,

I can't get corn syrup, but I'm sure I recall someone saying just to use Liquid Glucose instead...can anyone confirm this?

In case it helps, I'm planning on trying Michele Foster's Delicous Fondant.

Many thanks in adavance!

14 replies
Homemade-Goodies Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 10:38am
post #2 of 15

Hi...I Googled this: http://www.ochef.com/784.htm

Seems you can use the liquid glucose for the corn syrup, although technical not identical items.

Best of luck with your project!!

Homemade-Goodies Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 10:40am
post #3 of 15

PS: If there are any Chinese or West Indies food stores on Jersey, you may find quite a few American products. I'm in Holland and have a similar product, but have found some success with these and Suriname stores.

Ta!

Homemade-Goodies Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 11:09am
post #4 of 15

ok, now I'm just attention seeking...but, I meant problem, not product. icon_biggrin.gif

vixterfsu Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 11:26am
post #5 of 15

corn syrup is the stuff that is in everything we eat and makes us fat! LOL.

BigTexinWV Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 12:23pm
post #6 of 15

You can normally find corn syrup with all the other syrup at the grocery store. A few times I can find it in the baking aisle.

http://laser.physics.sunysb.edu/~qwen/pictures/854.jpg

lentula Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 3:10pm
post #7 of 15

Many thanks for the glucose confirmation icon_smile.gif

Sadly we definitely don't have corn syrup here icon_sad.gif

agagnier Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 3:58pm
post #8 of 15

I have a recipe to make your own corn syrup. I haven't tried it yet.

Corn Syrup

2 cups granulated sugar
3/4 cup water
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter
Dash of salt

In a heavy 2 1/2 quart saucepan, combine all ingredients over medium heat.
Stir till mixture comes to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer. Cover pan and cook
3 minutes, just to reduce crystal buildâup on sides of pan. Uncover and
cook, stirring often to "soft ball stage"ââor when you drop a little from a
spoon into a glass of cold water and it drops to bottom of water in a soft
ball. Cool the syrup completely and store in covered container at room
temperature to be used within 2 months. Makes about 2 cups.

Let me know if anyone tries it and how it turns out.

tonedna Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 4:08pm
post #9 of 15

You can find it in the grocery stores.. There is a brand name called Karo Syrup..That is corn syrup. But yes glucose would be the same ..just a little bit more expensive..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Homemade-Goodies Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 5:11pm
post #10 of 15

Edna, she is from Jersey in the Channel Islands...she has already checked the grocery stores available to her. That's why she wrote asking about the corn syrup vs glucose, which she can get apparently.

lentula Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 7:40pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by agagnier

I have a recipe to make your own corn syrup. I haven't tried it yet.

Corn Syrup

2 cups granulated sugar
3/4 cup water
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter
Dash of salt

In a heavy 2 1/2 quart saucepan, combine all ingredients over medium heat.
Stir till mixture comes to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer. Cover pan and cook
3 minutes, just to reduce crystal buildâup on sides of pan. Uncover and
cook, stirring often to "soft ball stage"ââor when you drop a little from a
spoon into a glass of cold water and it drops to bottom of water in a soft
ball. Cool the syrup completely and store in covered container at room
temperature to be used within 2 months. Makes about 2 cups.

Let me know if anyone tries it and how it turns out.





I've just tried making my own corn syrup! Unfortunately, although I have no experience of corn syrup, I don't think mine resembles the real thing icon_sad.gif

I wasn't sure how formed the 'balls' of syrup should be when dropped into the water (I thought my balls might be too little), and so may have over cooked. Now it's cooled into a rock solid brick icon_cry.gif

I shall try again another day, but tonight I'm hoping I can find enough glucose in my cupboard...

Many thanks all icon_smile.gif

tracey1970 Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 12:20am
post #12 of 15

I am in a small town in Ontario, Canada, and I can buy corn syrup at my local grocery. Problem is that all I can find is the very golden stuff. When I read recipes for thinning BC with corn syrup, it always says light corn syrup, which I cannot find anywhere. I have looked for Karo syrup too and can't find any such thing. If I used the corn syrup, which is described as "golden," that I can get then my icing would be discoloured by it. So I know what corn syrup is, but I can't get the kind that others can get. Is it a US only thing??

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 12:33am
post #13 of 15

tracey1970

Corn syrup is definitely a US thing, and it is derived from corn. Golden syrup is derived from sugar cane.

If you have a Wilton supplier near you, ask them for liquid glucose. If you cannot find it at your supply store, check with your local pharmacy. Some drug stores carry this, behind the counter.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

xstitcher Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 12:49am
post #14 of 15

I "googled" this ? and this is 1 of the links I found:

http://www.ochef.com/362.htm

I've copied the info into this post for ease:

What is Corn Syrup?

Q. Could you please tell me what corn syrup is? I live in New Zealand and have not heard this name before. We have golden syrup, treacle, and maple syrup â is it any of these?

A. Corn syrup is just what the name implies, a liquid derivative of corn starch, that is primarily the sugar called glucose. It is used extensively in the manufacture of processed foods and beverages in the US, because it does not crystallize as readily as sugar and is generally less expensive (although it is also not as sweet as sugar).

It is available to consumers in the US in two forms â light, which has been clarified to remove all color (and which is essentially flavorless), and dark, to which caramel color and molasses have been added. Because of its tendency not to crystallize, it is often called for in recipes for frostings, candies, jam, and jellies.

If light corn syrup is not available, you can substitute a sugar syrup made with 1-1/4 cups sugar and 1/3 cup water, boiled together until syrupy. If your recipe calls for dark corn syrup, weâd suggest using a sugar syrup with a dash of dark treacle or unsulfured molasses, both of which are derived from sugar cane.

HTH! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

tracey1970 Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 2:31am
post #15 of 15

Thanks, Theresa, for the clarification. I'll ask next time I'm in.

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