How Do I Add A Juice To This Recipe? Please Help!!!!!!

Baking By Mommaskip Updated 21 Apr 2008 , 9:18am by JanH

Mommaskip Posted 19 Apr 2008 , 11:51pm
post #1 of 12

I have a question. I wanted to try the vanilla butter cake recipe from the mermaid bakery. i was wondering if i could add a oranger strawberry banana juice that i have to that recipe for the flavor. if so i would i add it in without making the batter too thin? please help. i was gonna to make a strawberry flavored buttercream to go with this. i wanted to make it tonight. thanks so much.

11 replies
staceyboots Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 12:04am
post #2 of 12

does the recipe include any liquid ingredients?

foxymomma521 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 12:05am
post #3 of 12

You would replace Either some or all of the water or milk with the juice. Same for your BC. But you could also try adding strawberry and orange extracts... Good luck!

kbrown99 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 12:06am
post #4 of 12

Without seeing a recipe, I can't say for sure how it would affect it. Since it's a butter cake, I doubt it has much liquid in it. Having said that, you could substitute the juice for any liquid. The problem I see is that most of those juices don't have a very strong flavor and there isn't much liquid anyway, so I'm not sure the flavor would carry over into the cake. You could always try either DaVinci or Torino syrups (they're used for coffees and Italian sodas) and brush it on the cake after it's baked to both add flavor and moisture. You could also add the syrup to a buttercream and use as a filling. Hopefully that helps and that someone has some better ideas/information for you.

busymom9431 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 12:10am
post #5 of 12

You could also buy the juice concentrate and either use it straight or just diluted with a little bit of water so it has a strong flavor.

LeanneW Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 12:20am
post #6 of 12

this might not help but i use juice in imbc by reducing over a really low heat for a long time until its syrupy and I add it to taste to the bc.

I have substituted OJ for all the milk in a yellow cake recipe and it was great, then another time I substituted fresh lemon juice for the milk in the same recipe and it was a disaster. the lemon was just too tart and left that "dry" feeling in the back of your throat.

I treid the lemon again using 25% lemon juice and 75% milk, much better.

i suppose you could reduce the juice and add it the cake batter, the reduction is much more concentrated. If you do add a reduction i probably wouldn't even modify the rest of the recipe as you wouldn't really be adding much more liquid.

Please let us know what you do and how it turns out.

Mommaskip Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 2:24am
post #7 of 12

kbrown99...here is the recipe i want to use and substitute in the juice.

Vanilla Butter Cake from The Mermaid Bakery


This is a scratch cake recipe that makes a cake comparable to the texture and taste of a box mix....only better. It makes a tender crumb that, when cool, carves easily, and stacks well. It's versatile too. I use it for my rum cakes, substituting 1/2 cup of rum for half of the milk, bake in a bundt pan, and then brush with a sugar/rum syrup.

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
2 cups sugar
4 large eggs, at room temperature
1 Tbls white vinegar + enough milk to make 1 cup, at room temperature
1 tsp Creme Bouqet or 1 tsp Vanilla
2 3/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
2 1/4 tsp baking powder
3/4 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, put oven rack into center of oven.
Grease and flour pans (9X13, 3=8", 2=9", or 1=10")
Cream butter and sugar together until fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each. Mix the Creme Bouqet or Vanilla into the milk. Mix the flour, baking powder and salt together in a separate bowl. Add flour to butter/sugar/eggs in two parts, alternating with the milk mixture, beating well after each addition. Divide batter into prepared pans. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted into the center of cake comes out clean. Let cool in pans 10 minutes, then remove from pans and cool completely on wire rack.

kbrown99 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 1:18pm
post #8 of 12

I'll have to save that recipe for my files. It sounds really good.

It looks like you could probably substitute the juice in for the milk. It might give you a slightly different texture though. The fat in the milk helps to produce a more tender crumb. Also, since the recipe calls for the milk to mixed with the vinegar, you're basically making buttermilk (don't know why it doesn't just call for that). Buttermilk (or soured milk as here) is thicker than milk so it "might" make the batter a little runnier, but it shouldn't make much of a difference other than that.

If your juice is strong enough, it should carry the flavor over well with that amount of liquid. If not, I'd do as some of the others have suggested and either reduce it or use concentrate, etc.

One last thought, but I'm not sure about this one. Because your adding a fruit juice instead of the milk, you may want to substitute the vinegar with lemon juice. You'd have the same acid requirements of the recipe, but with a fruit note instead of just the sour to blend with the juice.

HTH

CakesByLJ Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 1:33pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mommaskip

kbrown99...here is the recipe i want to use and substitute in the juice.

Vanilla Butter Cake from The Mermaid Bakery




I make this cake a lot (it's my favorite), and I don't see why you couldn't subsitute the juice, but I would probably use a 50/50 ratio, half sour milk, half juice. Frankly this cake has such a strong butter/vanilla flavor, I wonder why you would choose this recipe to alter. Are you looking for a citrus flavor cake?

CakesByLJ Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 1:45pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbrown99

I'll have to save that recipe for my files. It sounds really good.

the recipe calls for the milk to mixed with the vinegar, you're basically making buttermilk (don't know why it doesn't just call for that). HTH




I did some research on this subject, and learned that most buttermilk available is low fat. It is difficult to find whole fat buttermilk, so using the vinegar mixed with regular whole milk produces the ideal ingredient. It is cheaper than stocking two separate milks.. a win-win for me Anyway, I converted this recipe to use cake flour and loved the results icon_biggrin.gif

kbrown99 Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 1:50pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakesByLJ

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbrown99

I'll have to save that recipe for my files. It sounds really good.

the recipe calls for the milk to mixed with the vinegar, you're basically making buttermilk (don't know why it doesn't just call for that). HTH



I did some research on this subject, and learned that most buttermilk available is low fat. It is difficult to find whole fat buttermilk, so using the vinegar mixed with regular whole milk produces the ideal ingredient. It is cheaper than stocking two separate milks.. a win-win for me Anyway, I converted this recipe to use cake flour and loved the results icon_biggrin.gif




Thanks. I hadn't thought about the fact that buttermilk is low-fat. I usually keep some buttermilk on hand for baking and fried chicken (my husband is a fried chicken nut). I'll have to try that since I usually have whole milk also for the baby. It should produce a more tender crumb with the extra fat. I know my belgian waffle recipe calls for whole milk specifically for that reason (it helps it crisp the outside too).

JanH Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 9:18am
post #12 of 12

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