Need Help On How To Take Apart And Serve Wedding Cake

Decorating By Angelgirl Updated 25 Apr 2008 , 8:13pm by KimAZ

Angelgirl Posted 17 Apr 2008 , 1:01am
post #1 of 15

I recently made my first stacked "wedding" cake- it was used for a class I took. I put it all together nicely and loved how it looked. I had already planned to take the cake apart to give the different layers to co-workers at 2 different jobs. But, then it occured to me that I have never taken a stacked cake apart. Does anyone have a tutorial? Mostly, I want to know how to get the layers apart without the icing from the bottom layer sticking to the cake board on the cake above it. I remember seeing one before and thought I save it, but it was before the crash on here. I would also love to learn the way you properly cut and serve a wedding cake of that size.

THANKS!

14 replies
JanH Posted 17 Apr 2008 , 4:30am
post #2 of 15

How to cut & serve clean slices of wedding cake:
(indydebi's methos is so much easier than Wilton's.)

http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page19.html

You're right, indydebi's "If you've never cut your own cake before...." thread was lost in the crash.

HTH

indydebi Posted 17 Apr 2008 , 12:22pm
post #3 of 15

Ironically, I relisted my reasons to cut a wedding cake just yesterday on this thread (page 2) http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-5893510-.html#5893510

If you have a good crusting BC icing, the icing shouldn't stick. Mine never does. If you look at the pics in the link provided by JanH, you can see the indentations on top of the tiers that show the plastic plates were sitting right on the cake icing ... yet when they were removed, the icing stayed in place.

tiggy2 Posted 17 Apr 2008 , 2:06pm
post #4 of 15

What do you use to lift the layer off the one beneath it without messing it up?

indydebi Posted 17 Apr 2008 , 6:02pm
post #5 of 15

When I'm disassembling a cake, I just use the knife (that I'll use to cut the cake) and slip it under the cardboard, lifting it until I can get my hand under it and lift it right off.

Angelgirl Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 2:43am
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

When I'm disassembling a cake, I just use the knife (that I'll use to cut the cake) and slip it under the cardboard, lifting it until I can get my hand under it and lift it right off.




I tried this when I took apart my practice cake and it one end started to dig into the layer beneath it. But, the top, 6 in tier came off pretty easily. The 8 in middle layer, however, wouldn't lift up at all. It ripped an 8 in circle of icing right off the bottom layer and stuck to the cake circle! It was a mess and I don't want that to happen at the wedding! The icing was purchased from a local supply store, not my own recipe which I think crusts better.

Does anyone do anything else to keep the layers from sticking??

And, thanks for posting the tutorial from indydebi- that was the post I was talking about!

alanahodgson Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 12:38pm
post #7 of 15

You could try laying a round of sillicone coated parchment paper under your board. Some people use a good dusting of powdered sugar. Others have said coconut, but I personally would not put coconut on a cake unless it was meant to be a part of the flavor requested by the customer.

JenniferL Posted 20 Apr 2008 , 7:53pm
post #8 of 15

I use large straws to support each cake. I usually cut them slightly taller than the cake and then cover the small gap with my icing border. That way the cakes aren't actually touching.

ccr03 Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 3:44pm
post #9 of 15

I ditto JenniferL's method. haven't had any complaints yet!

Angelgirl Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 5:52pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferL

I use large straws to support each cake. I usually cut them slightly taller than the cake and then cover the small gap with my icing border. That way the cakes aren't actually touching.




What kind of straws? Do you have any pictures? I've never heard of this and when I think of straws, I don't think of them being very sturdy!

JenniferL Posted 21 Apr 2008 , 7:00pm
post #11 of 15

Here is a link to the straws:
http://www.bobateadirect.com/Bag-of-Fat-Bubble-Tea-Straws-pr-418.html

They are pretty thick and have a larger diameter than regular straws. The best thing about them is that the end is cut at an angle so they're easy to push down into your cake. HTH!

Angelgirl Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 2:42am
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferL

Here is a link to the straws:
http://www.bobateadirect.com/Bag-of-Fat-Bubble-Tea-Straws-pr-418.html

They are pretty thick and have a larger diameter than regular straws. The best thing about them is that the end is cut at an angle so they're easy to push down into your cake. HTH!




Thank you! How many do you use? Do you just use them the same as you would use dowels? Do you use these instead of the dowels? And how much to do you leave sticking out?

kbrown99 Posted 24 Apr 2008 , 2:50am
post #13 of 15

I actually just ordered from them through Ebay and they shipped super quick. I can't wait to try the straws.

JenniferL Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 2:23pm
post #14 of 15

I just use them istead of dowels in each layer- the same number. As far as the height, I cut them just slightly taller than the cake. You don't want it to be obvious, just enough that the cakes don't touch- 1/8 of an inch or less. Just practice until you find out what works best for you. I hope this makes sense.

KimAZ Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 8:13pm
post #15 of 15

I use a piece of wax paper cut to the same size at the cake board under each cake to help prevent the frosting from sticking or pulling up off the tier below. Works just fine!

KimAZ

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%