Do The Us And Australia Have Different Cup Sizes?

Decorating By banba Updated 15 Apr 2008 , 11:52am by Cakechick123

banba Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 12:33pm
post #1 of 6

Just bought a set of cups to try out some CC recipes but I don't know which ones they are, US or Aus?

Measures read as follows:

1 cup (250ml)
1/2 cup (125ml)
1/3 cup (80ml)
1/4 cup (60ml)

so which ones are they? Would it matter in the long run as I would be using the same ingredient proportions in a recipe anyway? Hope this makes sense!

Also when a US recipe calls for say 1cup flour is that sifted first and then lightly put in the cup and leveled? Does the same apply for p.s also, sift then fill? Like is it always sifted first before measuring?

From what I can gather the only thing you pack in is brown sugar and after that a good recipe will specify further? TIA

5 replies
banba Posted 15 Apr 2008 , 2:23am
post #2 of 6

Ah someone must have the answers to these questions about measuring cups and sifting before weighing?

JanH Posted 15 Apr 2008 , 4:26am
post #3 of 6

I'd say you have an Australian measuring set. icon_smile.gif

U.S. dry and liquid measuring cups:

http://www.metric-conversions.org/volume-conversion.htm

One cup equals:

U.S. = 237 milliliters (legal cup is 240 ml)
U.K. = 284 milliliters
Australia = 250 milliliters

Some handy conversion info:

http://allrecipes.com/help/recipeinfo/conversions.aspx

Compacted flour weighs more, so I always aerate the flour with a spoon. Then spoon flour gently in the measuring cup and level by drawing a knife across the rim of the measuring cup.

Using the "scoop and drag" method of filling & then shaking off the excess to level will not yield the most accurate measurement.

Ditto for powdered sugar measurements. Although for powdered sugar, I always use a sifter to aerate.

Australian measuring spoon measurements:

20ml : Tablespoon*
5ml : Teaspoon
2.5ml : 1/2 Teaspoon
1.35ml : 1/4 Teaspoon
.635ml : 1/8 Teaspoon

*The Australian Tbsp. contains four teaspoons!

British measuring spoons:
http://www.heals.co.uk/invt/596264

1.25ml or 1/4 tsp
2.5ml or 1/2tsp
5ml or 1tsp
10ml or 1dsp
15ml or 1 tbsp

American measuring spoons:
http://www.cookware.com/Cuisipro-74-7002-CPR1001.html

1/8 teaspoon (0.625 ml)
1/4 teaspoon (1.25 ml)
1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml)
1 teaspoon (5 ml)
1 tablespoon (15 ml)

If measuring by weight, it's not necessary to aerate the flour or powdered sugar - as 8 oz. is always 8 oz.

However, removing lumps from flour or powdered sugar is an important consideration since it's so much more difficult to accomplish after it's incorporated into batter or frosting.

Liquid conversion calculators:

http://www.metric-conversions.org/volume-conversion.htm

History of American weights & measurments:

http://www.miketodd.net/encyc/measures1.htm

American cookery weight & measures:
(With metric conversions.)

http://www.miketodd.net/encyc/cooking.htm

HTH

P.S. Had to include this blog on the various sized "cups" encountered by the poster:
(It's a hoot, and very informative.)

http://www.lemis.com/grog/recipes/measures.php

http://www.lemis.com/grog/recipes/recipes.php
(Also included some recipes.)

Edited to repair broken links, again.

banba Posted 15 Apr 2008 , 8:54am
post #4 of 6

JanH (chronicle high lord!)thank you so much. What a great help and the blog you included is quirky, the mind boggles!

Mike1394 Posted 15 Apr 2008 , 9:56am
post #5 of 6

That's the problem w/ American cook books. Cups, tsp tbs. Weights are the way to go. Once you get used to weighing things, you'll realize how inaccurate measuring cups are. You can take three different people scoop out a cup of flour from the same bin. They will more than likely weigh out different. Baking is a science, let the cooks have the measuring spoons, and cups. Get a scale, get used to weighing things out. Your recipes will be more successful.

Mike

Cakechick123 Posted 15 Apr 2008 , 11:52am
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

That's the problem w/ American cook books. Cups, tsp tbs. Weights are the way to go. Once you get used to weighing things, you'll realize how inaccurate measuring cups are. You can take three different people scoop out a cup of flour from the same bin. They will more than likely weigh out different. Baking is a science, let the cooks have the measuring spoons, and cups. Get a scale, get used to weighing things out. Your recipes will be more successful.

Mike




this is VERY good advise, since I started weighing my ingredients I have not had a single cake flop icon_smile.gif

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