What Is The Easiest Way To Place The 2Nd. Layer 0N Lg.cakes

Decorating By superstar Updated 14 Apr 2008 , 6:14am by dandelion56602

superstar Posted 11 Apr 2008 , 11:08pm
post #1 of 11

I have always had a problem placing the 2nd. layer on top of the 1st with cakes 12" & larger. I somehow always manage to do it but I am not comfortable with it, I feel there must be an easier way of doing this & would love to have some input from all the talented people on CC. I would appreciate any help & ideas, right now I just say a prayer & hope for the best, maybe there is a tutorial or something or does anyone know of a video/DVD I can buy?

10 replies
prettycakelady Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 2:34am
post #2 of 11

That very idea is what kept me from making cakes larger than 10in. for a very long. I have an aunt who decorated cakes for over 20 years and her advice for placing the second layer on top was to leave the second layer in the pan, wrap the pan in saran and place it in the freezer for 45 mins to an hour and then place it on top. I tried this with a 14in. layer last year and it worked perfectly. She also said if I didnt have access to a freezer large enough to accomodate the layer, to allow it to sit overnight and then try placing it on top. This allows it to firm up a bit. Im sure there are other ways to do it, but this has worked for me. I hope this helps.

PrettyCakeLady

indydebi Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 4:18am
post #3 of 11

working with a frozen cake makes it MUCH easier. cakes thaw pretty quick so if you don't like icing a frozen cake, it doesn't take long for it to thaw.

I also put the 2nd layer on a large cardboard, place the edge of the cake in place and, holding the cake at an angle, pretty much just pull the cardboard out, allowing the cake to fall into place.

tobycat Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 4:31am
post #4 of 11

Wilton finally made something that I can rave about!

It's a large cake mover (kind of looks like a large pastry chopper) that can move a cake up to 16". It actually works!

I can put it under a cake slide it where I want it and the thing is so thin that it actually doesn't hurt the bottom edge of the cake like the boards I used to use do.

HOpe this helps.

S.

milissasmom Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 4:39am
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by prettycakelady

leave the second layer in the pan, wrap the pan in saran and place it in the freezer for 45 mins to an hour and then place it on top. prettycakelady




Does this mean you frost the second layer while it is stacked on the cake?? I freeze mine for a bit AFTER it is frosted and then use my lifter to slide it on top of the 1st layer and then I decorate.

prettycakelady Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 3:53pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by milissasmom

Quote:
Originally Posted by prettycakelady

leave the second layer in the pan, wrap the pan in saran and place it in the freezer for 45 mins to an hour and then place it on top. prettycakelady



Does this mean you frost the second layer while it is stacked on the cake?? I freeze mine for a bit AFTER it is frosted and then use my lifter to slide it on top of the 1st layer and then I decorate.




Hi Milissas Mom,

The bottom layer is already placed on the masonite or cake drum, make the dam around the edge and fill. After that , take the layer out of the freezer gently flip it out of the pan and slide it on top of the bottom layer on the masonite board. Let it come to room temp, crumbcoat and then place the final coat of icing on. Yes you frost the entire cake after the top layer is placed on that bottom layer. I hope I clarified things. icon_smile.gif

PrettyCakeLady

milissasmom Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 4:14pm
post #7 of 11

OH OK!!!! DUHH...I was thinking the original post was talking about stacking TIERS! YIKES...she did say layers icon_smile.gif Thank you...now I officially feel silly icon_smile.gif Have an awesome weekend! icon_lol.gif

superstar Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 12:54am
post #8 of 11

Thanks so much for all the help, prettycakelady, I am going to try your method , it sounds good. Debi, I like your idea about the cardboard too. I bought one of those Wilton lifters, but I was still nervous about using it, however I think it will work well with the slightly frozen cake. I knew i would get some good answers from my CC buddies.

butterflywings Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 1:22am
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonoma9

Wilton finally made something that I can rave about!

It's a large cake mover (kind of looks like a large pastry chopper) that can move a cake up to 16". It actually works!

I can put it under a cake slide it where I want it and the thing is so thin that it actually doesn't hurt the bottom edge of the cake like the boards I used to use do.

HOpe this helps.

S.




do you have a link to where i could buy this?

superstar Posted 13 Apr 2008 , 1:33am
post #10 of 11

I bought mine at Michaels when I was visiting Los Angeles.

dandelion56602 Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 6:14am
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by milissasmom

OH OK!!!! DUHH...I was thinking the original post was talking about stacking TIERS! YIKES...she did say layers icon_smile.gif Thank you...now I officially feel silly icon_smile.gif Have an awesome weekend! icon_lol.gif




Well, you're not the only one who misread. I had this horrible image in my head. I would like to know about stacking tiers though b/c I have yet to stack a large tiered cake. Guess i would be afraid of dropping it since they can get heavy. Yikes!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%