Anyone Use The Upside Down Method For Icing?

Decorating By yellobutterfly Updated 14 Apr 2008 , 8:54pm by alanahodgson

yellobutterfly Posted 11 Apr 2008 , 9:21pm
post #1 of 12

I was just looking thru the articles and was fascinated w/this article on icing your cake upside down

http://www.cakecentral.com/article6-Upside-Down-Icing-Technique-for-Perfectly-Smooth-Icing.html

wondering if any of you do this or have tried it and what your thoughts are?

11 replies
daisy114 Posted 11 Apr 2008 , 9:26pm
post #2 of 12

I use to use that method. My icing came out so smooth but it was just a little too time consuming for me so now I don't do it that way anymore.

eatCakes Posted 11 Apr 2008 , 9:50pm
post #3 of 12

I've tried it and it's amazing how smooth everything comes out. It does take a bit more time, but I think I might start using the technique again just because of how well it works, and how easy it is! icon_smile.gif

alanahodgson Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 12:30am
post #4 of 12

I use it 99% of the time. The only issue I have with it is getting a smooth top with no air bubbles showing through. I cover most of my cakes with fondant so air bubbles or not, it doesn't matter.

leah_s Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 4:38am
post #5 of 12

I tried it a few times and think its more trouble than its worth.

dailey Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 5:11am
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellobutterfly

I was just looking thru the articles and was fascinated w/this article on icing your cake upside down

http://www.cakecentral.com/article6-Upside-Down-Icing-Technique-for-Perfectly-Smooth-Icing.html

wondering if any of you do this or have tried it and what your thoughts are?




i used this method if i need my cake to be darn near *perfect*. i don't think its time-consuming at all. as a matter of fact, i spend less time icing my cake with this technique than if i tried to iced it without it. here's what i do for a nice, smooth top (keep in mind, though, that i used smbc). make sure the icing is very soft, sometimes i microwave it a bit, then smooth it on the parchement paper (i actually used vinyl) in one direction. then give it a few good taps against the counter ( i used a clear cutting board so i can lift it and look underneath to make sure it has no air bubbles and is smooth). works like a charm...

KoryAK Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 5:47am
post #7 of 12

I use it for topsy turvy cakes - does NOT take more time than trying to ice THEM smooth and it really gets em perfect.

amysue99 Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 6:24am
post #8 of 12

I tried this once on a 2-layer cake and it was a disaster! How do y'all do it without the filling squishing and then ruing your perfectly smooth sides? Refrigerate first?

alanahodgson Posted 12 Apr 2008 , 11:17am
post #9 of 12

sometimes I refrigerate before flipping, but most of the time I don't. Never had a squishing problem. Make sure you use a nice stiff icing for the dam. For someone who is already skilled at getting sharp corners, the method may seem like a pain. I'm not really that good at doing it freehand so this is no hassle at all to do it that way.

cakebaker1957 Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 3:17pm
post #10 of 12

will this work on square cakes??

sarahnichole975 Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 3:33pm
post #11 of 12

Wow that looks great. I think I may have to try this.

alanahodgson Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 8:54pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakebaker1957

will this work on square cakes??




for sure!

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