Wax Covered Cake Board

Decorating By ksgirl Updated 8 Apr 2008 , 3:18am by iamlis

ksgirl Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 1:39pm
post #1 of 35

I purchased cake board that is covered in wax. Is there a need to cover it? It will be a full sheet cake so I would rather not if anyone can assure me that my buttercream won't seep through.

I covered a cake board in regular wax paper once and it seeped through. But since this is already covered in wax, I thought it may be different.

34 replies
ksgirl Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 2:02pm
post #2 of 35

hello? anyone?

woodthi32 Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 2:09pm
post #3 of 35

I would think it souldn't seep through straight parrafin wax. Why don't you drop some icing on it and leave it there for a few hours and seeicon_smile.gif?
Where did you get this board?

ksgirl Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 3:54pm
post #4 of 35

I bought the cake board from a baker supply store. I was aweful pricey, IMO, about $3.50! Yikes!

oliveoyle Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 4:30pm
post #5 of 35

IMHO I wouldn't think that it would seep through those wax covered boards

woodthi32 Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 4:46pm
post #6 of 35

yeah, that's pricey, but you may find it is worth it.
did you put some icing on it?

veejaytx Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 5:53pm
post #7 of 35

Hello...did you try out the icing on the board?

dustymorris Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 6:31pm
post #8 of 35

Hi, ksgirl!
I use waxed boards and no it wont seep through. There is no need to wrap the board in anything unless it is for presentation purpases.

I buy mine from cakeartpartystore.com, they are only $1.6 per full sheet board. I also buy my boxes from there and the shipping isn't too bad. For 5 full sheet boxes and boards, 5 half sheet boards and boxes, and also 5 quarter sheet boxes and boards was only $14.88 for shipping. That is regular ground shipping. Someone else may know of a better place but this is the best I could find.

HTH!
Dusty Morris

woodthi32 Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 11:38pm
post #9 of 35

So, I looked at them, and I assume that these are just boards for a single cake, not a tiered one?? Not as strong as a drum??

beachcakes Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 11:42pm
post #10 of 35

I just bought some 6" to try them out. They appear to be regular cake circles with a light coating of wax on the white part. I was hoping they were coated on both sides so I could use them for stacked cakes, but they're not. icon_sad.gif I hate wrapping boards.

leah_s Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 11:54pm
post #11 of 35

I have never wrapped a cake board - ever, unless it was for the bottom tier (or a one tier cake).

beachcakes Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 11:57pm
post #12 of 35

Really Leah? This is terrific! You mean I've been doing extra work all this time??

I was always afraid they'd get soggy or leave little cardboard fuzzies!

OMG - I would be so happy if I never had to wrap a board on a stacked cake!! icon_smile.gif

kendi25 Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 12:15am
post #13 of 35

Samw here for me Leah - I have never wrapped a cake board. And, I use the masonite at the base, which I decorate for style. icon_biggrin.gif

leah_s Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 12:36am
post #14 of 35

really. It's just not necessary.

ksgirl Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 12:59am
post #15 of 35

I bought the cake board from a baker supply store. I was aweful pricey, IMO, about $3.50! Yikes!

ksgirl Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 1:05am
post #16 of 35

Wierd- not sure why my post got posted twice.

Anyway, I needed to hurry and do my cake so I went ahead and covered it in fancy wrap foil paper.

I have tried using plain cake boards for sheet cakes and have always had the buttercream seep into the board and create an unsightly grease mark. Maybe I'm using too cheap of a board type- dunno.

beachcakes Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 1:15am
post #17 of 35

I don't know what size you got, but I bought some from country kitchens. http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/SearchResults.aspx?description=wax%20boards&page=-1

BC will seep into a plain board, so for the bottom board you would need to wrap it. Apparently there is no need to wrap the boards in between stacked layers!! icon_smile.gif

dustymorris Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 2:44am
post #18 of 35

The cake boards I posted about are only waxed on one side. I don't know if you can even buy any that are waxed on both sides. Can you??? cakeartpartystore has drums and masonite also. countrykitchensa.com is good too. I use them as well.

dustymorris Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 2:50am
post #19 of 35

beachcakes- I bought full, half and quarter sheet boards. I only do cakes part time so I can't aford to buy them in a big bulk like that....and cakeartpartystore.com sells them individually or in bulk. icon_smile.gif

beachcakes Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 1:54pm
post #20 of 35

I do too - you can buy in quantities of 12 from there. icon_smile.gif

MacsMom Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 2:21pm
post #21 of 35

Leahs, I just love you to death! LOL. Nearly everything I've read from you has put me at ease for one reason or another. I hadn't been covering my cardboard circles for stacking and was getting nervous at the beginning of this thread...

AJsGirl Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 2:40pm
post #22 of 35

Cake Art Party Store is in the next town to me. I love those guys! It's where I get all my supplies. Anyway, I use their wax covered boards all the time, and I don't cover them unless it's for presentation.

HTH

leah_s Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 3:31pm
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacsMom

Leahs, I just love you to death! LOL. Nearly everything I've read from you has put me at ease for one reason or another. I hadn't been covering my cardboard circles for stacking and was getting nervous at the beginning of this thread...




Ah, thanks MacsMom. I think many of us just put too much stress on ourselves. This isn't world peace or global warming. Cakes are important yes, of course, but not to the point of making your life/self crazy over it.

Now I am nuts over food safety issues, but I think that's valid. icon_biggrin.gif

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 4:39pm
post #24 of 35

so it's alright not to wrap the cake board with contact paper or whatever? doesn't the icing on the top of the bottom tier get soaked into the upper tier's cake board? this will really save me a lot of time.

Krystl Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 4:43pm
post #25 of 35

IMO - ??
IMHO - ??

sorry, I'm still working on my translator!

leah_s Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 4:45pm
post #26 of 35

Ahhh . . .good question. See I just think that you are ALL using SPS like me. There's always a plastic plate sitting on top of the tier, then the cardboard, then the cake. Nothing soaks thru. If you're using dowels and the cardboard is sitting directly on top of the iocing, then I don't know how that works, truly.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 4:52pm
post #27 of 35

okay leahs, thanks for clearing that up icon_smile.gif but it seems like that SPS is a really good technique. icon_smile.gif

Krystl IMO = In My Opinion, IMHO = In my humble opinion or in my honest opinion?

leah_s Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 4:56pm
post #28 of 35

Yeah, SPS is so easy, so effective and so cheap, that I honestly forget that some poeple still use dowels. For the life of me I can't figure out why . . .

penguinprincess Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 5:02pm
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Ahhh . . .good question. See I just think that you are ALL using SPS like me. There's always a plastic plate sitting on top of the tier, then the cardboard, then the cake. Nothing soaks thru. If you're using dowels and the cardboard is sitting directly on top of the iocing, then I don't know how that works, truly.




What does SPS stand for? I have looked at the acronnym page but it is not their or an exoanation of the tecnique. Would you mond explaining Leah? Thank you for your time@

leah_s Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 5:11pm
post #30 of 35

SPS = Single Plate Separator. It's the system from BakeryCrafts for supporting your cakes. No dowels to cut. If you'll PM me with your email address I'll send you illustrated directions. Unfortunately if you use a free email service like hotmail, it will not go thru as there are too many pictures.

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