Sheet Cake Question

Decorating By jamielittle Updated 8 Apr 2008 , 11:08pm by WendyLaLa

jamielittle Posted 3 Apr 2008 , 11:49pm
post #1 of 22

I have an order for a sheet cake. I've never done one before.

Should I just make the standard 2" cake?

Do I need to torte it?

Thanks,
Jamie

21 replies
diane Posted 3 Apr 2008 , 11:50pm
post #2 of 22

i would do the standard unless they request otherwise. did they specify what size?? icon_confused.gif

indydebi Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:15am
post #3 of 22

In my neck of the woods, a sheet cake is expected to be a 2", non-torted, non-filled cake. This may differ in different parts of the country......

bethneebabe Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:21am
post #4 of 22

I'm doing a sheet cake for a party next week and it's a 2" and I'm out East.

WendyLaLa Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:31am
post #5 of 22

I always do 2 inch filled. I just like cake with filling!!! So I usually offer it!!!! I'm out west in Cali!

linda2530 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:33am
post #6 of 22

I'm in No. Florida and a sheet cake is a 2" and it's not torted and filled. If someone requests it I charge extra. I've been decorating for 22+ years and it's not often that someone requests a torted and filled sheet.

robinscakes Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:39am
post #7 of 22

90% of what I do is sheet cakes. I do two layers with filling in between. Most of the grocery stores, Sam's Club, etc. around here do a 2" unfilled. I think that's what most people expect, and I think that they like getting cakes from my bakery because we're different. I'd double check with the customer to be sure.

indydebi Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:41am
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by robinscakes

I think that they like getting cakes from my bakery because we're different.




Excellent marketing point! I may have to reconsider how I offer sheet cakes and go this route! thumbs_up.gif

Win Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:48am
post #9 of 22

I do both, but confess: I hate torting a sheet cake. That's assuming you are talking about a full sheet. The half and quarter are not an issue. Some people just make two layers of 2" cake which is a lot of cake. When I torte, I do add a little extra charge on the sheet-style. The amt. charged depends on the size of the cake, but does not exceed $4.00. It's about half and half in terms of who requests it and who does not...

busymom9431 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:55am
post #10 of 22

robinscakes wrote:
I think that they like getting cakes from my bakery because we're different.

indydebi wrote:
Excellent marketing point! I may have to reconsider how I offer sheet cakes and go this route!

I LOVE this idea, thank you!

Bunniefluf Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 1:37am
post #11 of 22

I live in Central Florida and I either torte or I make two 2" layers (which IS alot of cake), but there's always a filling! I'll admit that I'm not fond of the torting process, but I prefer it to making two 2" layers.
I've never had a customer who only requested a single layer sheet cake; and it seems that most grocery store (like Publix) cakes have a filling too (at least for the quarter and half sheet sizes)

Of course I don't make anything larger than a half sheet cake; if I made a bigger one, then I'd probably be more apt to do a single layer...I imagine that torting doesn't get easier the bigger the cake! icon_rolleyes.gif I've seen the single layer large sheet cakes at Sam's Club.

As for consuming the cake, I personally prefer having a filling! If it's a store-bought cake, the filling helps alleviate the dryness of the cake, and if it's my cake, well, I think I make good homemade filling that compliments and enhances the cake and frosting flavors! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

robinscakes Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 1:46am
post #12 of 22

I don't torte my layers. I use a jellyroll style pan for all my sheet cakes (1/4, 1/2, 3/4 and full sheet). I can't imagine torting a full sheet! I use two pans, spread my filling on one, and then sandwich the two together in their pans. Then I remove one pan, place my cake board on top and then flip it and remove the other pan. Make sense? Then I just trim up the sides so all my sides are square. I think the filling really helps prevent dryness, and as I said before, it's something the other places don't do so it sets us apart. It also gives you the opportunity to add some fun flavors of fillings!

WendyLaLa Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 5:15am
post #13 of 22

When I split my cake I use fishing line wrapped around and pull it all the way through to cut it in half, then I use a tuff board to split the cake. I just shove the tuff board in between the layers fill my layer and slide the other half of the cake back on. Tuff boards are great they are reusable and slidey!!!!

lardbutt Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 5:22am
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by WendyLaLa

When I split my cake I use fishing line wrapped around and pull it all the way through to cut it in half, then I use a tuff board to split the cake. I just shove the tuff board in between the layers fill my layer and slide the other half of the cake back on. Tuff boards are great they are reusable and slidey!!!!



What is a tuff board?

WendyLaLa Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 5:28am
post #15 of 22

It's a white plastic cake board that has little scallops on the edges. It's not hard plastic though it's flexible. I've seen them in a lot of bakeries. They are great because they come in every cake size so I have one of each cake I make. I wish I could draw you a picture.
LaLa

lardbutt Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 1:47pm
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by WendyLaLa

It's a white plastic cake board that has little scallops on the edges. It's not hard plastic though it's flexible. I've seen them in a lot of bakeries. They are great because they come in every cake size so I have one of each cake I make. I wish I could draw you a picture.
LaLa



Where do you buy it? I am going to be making a wedding cake with the bottom teir 16x16. And I have NO IDEA how i'm gonna put it on top of the other!
Thanks for your response, MessyBaker

jamielittle Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 4:06pm
post #17 of 22

Thanks for all the help.

I guess I should have actually said, it's a half-sheet cake. And, it's just for my neighbor. Is it hard to torte the half sheet? She's not expecting me to but if it's not too difficult, I might like to try it. I know how much I like icing! icon_smile.gif

Tennessee Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 3:34am
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by robinscakes

I don't torte my layers. I use a jellyroll style pan for all my sheet cakes (1/4, 1/2, 3/4 and full sheet). I can't imagine torting a full sheet! I use two pans, spread my filling on one, and then sandwich the two together in their pans. Then I remove one pan, place my cake board on top and then flip it and remove the other pan. Make sense? Then I just trim up the sides so all my sides are square. I think the filling really helps prevent dryness, and as I said before, it's something the other places don't do so it sets us apart. It also gives you the opportunity to add some fun flavors of fillings!





I am baking my first sheet cake this week-end and could not figure out how to flip this cake. Thank you for the information, will let you know how it turns out.

Bunniefluf Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 3:36am
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamielittle

Is it hard to torte the half sheet?




No, a half sheet isn't too difficult. I use a big serrated knife, but you have to pay very close attention to make sure you cut straight through the middle. You can also use the fishing line method one of the other posts suggested...or plain waxed dental floss. Once cut in half, use another cake board to slide in between the two halves and remove the top half. Fill the bottom half, and then slide the top half back on to the cake. At that point, let the cake rest for a while (few hours to overnight) for settling before frosting it!
Oh, and make sure you use a very very sturdy board for transporting the whole cake. Otherwise, once you start moving it, if it flexes, it creates the opportunity for your frosting to crack! Might get one of those tuff boards they were talking about. icon_smile.gif

norma20 Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 4:26am
post #20 of 22

For big sheet cakes another good option is Elmer's foam board. They come in big sheets (20" x 30") and they also have different thickness. Also they are easy to cut. Michaels have it. Don't forget your discount coupon!

WendyLaLa Posted 8 Apr 2008 , 11:04pm
post #21 of 22

Messybaker! Sorry had a really big weekend and didn't get to get on the site at all! I get them from a party supply in Riverside Ca. My boss also keeps them in stock for us. I'll ask him if he can tell me where in NC you might be able to find them. Talk to you soon!
LaLa

WendyLaLa Posted 8 Apr 2008 , 11:08pm
post #22 of 22

O.k. I found a place on line to buy tuffboard cakes boards it's called
www.shopbakersnook.com
It looks like they have nice array. They are more expensive the regular cake boards, but they are reusable
Hope that helps
LaLa

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