mommy_of_3_DDs Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:05pm
post #1 of

I have the basic idea planned out. What I am looking for is suggestions on how to properly support it. It will be a 12"; 10"; 8"; and 6" layer cake with 2 layers per size so it will be quite large! I am covering in MMF because they want to peel the icing off and just eat the Rice Krispies. Bride HATES cake... so this was the way to make her happy on her day. I was making a regular cake and gonna make her a small treat cake just for her as a gift and the Groom said that is a great idea make the whole cake Rice Krispies; Bride agreed so her I am asking for tips! By the way the BRIDE is my sister!

Do I need a crumb coat? I was thinking no.
Do I need pillars or dowels? How many?
How do I cut this cake? Just like a regular one?
What should I charge for this cake? I'd like to hear a range of ideas.
Thanks in advance for any ideas!

47 replies
Doug Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:19pm
post #2 of

crumbcoat - yes to smooth it out so texture doesn't show through fondant.

after that support just like any regular cake w/ plates/boards, dowels or pillars depending upon design.

cost -- same as regular cake -- most of $$ is the making not the ingredients -- and I dare say the cost of ingredients won't be all that much different.

weirkd Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:29pm
post #3 of

Also when you make them your going to have to compress the mixture more than usual. Using a little less butter also helps it keep it shape better. But what Ive found is get your basic shape and stick it in the fridge for about an hour. Then take it out and you can work with it a little better because its not as gooey.

CarolAnn Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:33pm
post #4 of

So she's assuming all the guests like rice krispie treats too! Hmm.....
I don't envy you having to cut all the RKT. I'd cut it the same as if it were cake, that's how I'd price it. Yes, you'd need to crumb coat to smooth over the rough texture. Good luck.

tonedna Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:43pm
post #5 of

lol..brides are so funny...did you suggest to her to just do RC one for her and the rest of the people can eat cake.. I would be so disappointed to not eat cake in a wedding. Anyways..You have to cover the rice crispies like dough said...I f you dont it shows through the fondant.
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

tonedna Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:44pm
post #6 of

oh and yes i would put support ...Maybe straws...depending on how many tiers!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

Doug Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:48pm
post #7 of

oh and form the tiers in your normal pans so they are already the correct shape.

----
but as other's have pointed out --- will all the guests appreciate such a cake???

KHalstead Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 11:50pm
post #8 of

crunch up the rice krispies a little bit before adding the marshmallows and add less butter and use butter flavored extract to make up for the lack of butter...they will stick together and hold the shape much better...other than that I would shove em' in my cake pans (maybe line the pans with plastic wrap for easy removal) and then dowel and stack like a regular cake!

mommyle Posted 30 Mar 2008 , 12:04am
post #9 of

Are you going to torte and fill it??? If I were subjected to eat rice crispies instead of cake then I would at least want some DAMN yummy chocolate ganache filling, or something like that!!!

all4cake Posted 30 Mar 2008 , 12:04am

I've got no ideas. I just wanted to say hooray for your sister! and her husband-to-be for supporting her taste! and HOORAY for her that she has a sister who is willing to make this happen for her!

It's their wedding, definitely it should be the way they want it. I don't think it's any different than the bride who wants an all chocolate...vanilla...pound...fruit(ugh)...lemon...strawberry...cheesecake....cake.

I would agree with Doug though on the crumb coating for a smooth finish....either that or grind your cereal for a finer texture.

Bossy Posted 30 Mar 2008 , 12:21am

I needed a smoother RC mix for a recent project. I put the cereal in a zip lock and used a heavy rolling pin to smash it into smaller peices. It was a lot easier to crumb coat smooth!

CarolAnn Posted 30 Mar 2008 , 12:40am

I'm just one of those silly people who think a bride ought to consider how much cake she'll actually eat and whether the majority of her guests will like rice krispie treats instead of a piece of cake. A bride could gorge herself off one cake and still serve her guests what most would probably prefer. I know it's "her day" but I think it's great when a bride stops to consider her guests. I love GOOD wedding cake, and I would be disappointed to go to a wedding and get a slab of rkt instead of cake. But that's just me.

I would think that mashing the rice krispies would take something away from the krispiness of the treat.

KHalstead Posted 2 Apr 2008 , 12:57pm

well, I don't crush ALL of them.....just some....basically it just allows some smaller pieces to "fill in" some of the gaps that would show with fondant. It's still nice and krispy and crunch!

CarolAnn Posted 2 Apr 2008 , 1:21pm

Okay, that makes sense and sounds better too. Thanks for clarifying!!

deanwithana Posted 2 Apr 2008 , 1:32pm

OH MY GOODNESS......NO CAKE FOR THE GUESTS!!!! That is the only reason why people go to weddings!!!! icon_lol.gif I would be certainly disappointed!!!

mommy_of_3_DDs Posted 3 Apr 2008 , 5:29pm

Thanks for all the replies... they are hell bent on RKT so that is what they are getting there are a lot of "surprises" in this wedding... one they are Wiccan and having a Pagan ceremony which I am certain most of our family will NOT expect... I will make a trial run of the partially crushed cereal to see how that works!
One Q:
How do you torte and fill RKT? I like the idea of ganache I will suggest that... but please explain how that works?

pjaycakes Posted 3 Apr 2008 , 7:01pm

I would use a serrated bread knife to carefully cut the layers in half then fill, or you could mold the pans only half full and then just put the filling between 2 1" layers (that might be easier).

Are the cakes stacked or are there pillars?

Question for anyone - How would you support without a two plate system? Wouldn't it be hard to push pillars or dowels through them?

indydebi Posted 3 Apr 2008 , 10:59pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by deanwithana

OH MY GOODNESS......NO CAKE FOR THE GUESTS!!!! That is the only reason why people go to weddings!!!! icon_lol.gif I would be certainly disappointed!!!




My son-in-law says if he goes to a wedding and there is no white cake with white icing, then he's taking his gift and leaving! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

As I tell some of my brides, "You may think this day is all about you but it's not. while you are standing in the church, exchanging your vows, at that moment, it IS about you. But once you leave that church you are now hosting a very large event and you have guests to take care of. So Take. Care. Of them." Most mothers applaud me when I give this speech.

It would be considered very rude and inconsiderate to have a dinner party, invite all vegetarians, and serve prime rib because the hostess says, "It's MY party and that's what *I* like!" I dont' see a wedding as any different. She can have her RKT cake if she wants ... I'm not saying dont' have it. But to totally disregard and ignore the tastes and preferences of her guests is just another story to be posted on etiquettehell.com.

SweetResults Posted 8 Apr 2008 , 3:32am

My only problem with it is if you crumb coat the RKTs then cover in fondant, when you peel off the fondant the RKTs have absorbed some of the icing and they get sort of soggy stale, DH still liked them, I did not.

So definitely do a trial run, plus the RKTs will be much denser and rock hard when you grind them up. I do this when sculpting with them, however they are actually planning on EATING them.

I would say - no to the normal grind - maybe some choc ganache between layers of RKTs, not a soggy one tho, and cover with a THICK layer of fondant without a crumb coat. If it is thick you will still be able to get it smooth and not see the bumps of the RKTs underneath.

Good luck!

SaraW Posted 8 Apr 2008 , 12:34pm

I think it is a great idea. It is different and although not everyone likes RKT, not everyone likes cake either.

I think that chocolate ganache is a great idea and would taste great.

diane Posted 8 Apr 2008 , 4:03pm

i ground the rice krispies...like you do graham crackers. that way you won't have any bulge when covering with fondant. icon_wink.gif

busymom9431 Posted 8 Apr 2008 , 8:22pm

I am in the middle on this one. I agree with "NO CAKE?" but see that the bride wants it her way. I would make small RKT cake and smear it with buttercream and fondant and leave it sit for a couple of days and make your sister eat it and see how she likes it. It will NOT taste the same. RKT are best the first day, ok the second and not so good after that and that is without all of the moisture from the buttercream. I made an ice cream bowl cake for my dd this year with RKT scoops of ice cream. Same idea, buttercream with fondant over. I put the RKT ice cream scoops together at 10pm and we served it the next day around 5pm and I have to say they were not sooooooo good and I LOVE RKT.
Just a suggestion. Would hate to have her disappointed on her big day with her great idea!

DDiva Posted 8 Apr 2008 , 8:45pm

I have to agree with the folks that say that an all RKT wedding cake is not going to go over well...and there is going to be a LOT of 'cake' left over. I don't know too many adults that like RKT that much.

But, if that's what she wants.....

My question: why are you going to make the RKT? You can purchase large sheets of ready made treats from WalMart or a food distributor. Sure will make your life a loit easier!!

Niserise Posted 9 Apr 2008 , 12:50am

I actually like RKT, and think it would be fun to have that instead of cake at a wedding. I know it is a party for everyone, but the bride and groom are in charge of what is served and how it is put together. Whenever we sell RKT's at a bake sale they are the first things that go, and most of them are purchased by adults.

Have fun with it. The "cake" will probably get a better response than some people think.

carlamac Posted 18 Sep 2010 , 5:26am

This topic is really old, but is the first one that I have found that is somewhat related to my question. I am doing a 4 tier stacked cake for my grandparents 50th. We will have way to much cake. I would like to use RKT for the bottom cake layer (12 in). Would RKT that are comapcted really tight be a good support for the other 3 layers? Is a 12 inch cake stronger or 12 in RKT? I'm new at all of this but I am thinking that RKT would work very well when support is more important that the amount of cake you have?

Babs1964 Posted 18 Sep 2010 , 5:51am

Well put indydebi thumbs_up.gif

fairmaiden0101 Posted 18 Sep 2010 , 6:06am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niserise

I actually like RKT, and think it would be fun to have that instead of cake at a wedding. I know it is a party for everyone, but the bride and groom are in charge of what is served and how it is put together. Whenever we sell RKT's at a bake sale they are the first things that go, and most of them are purchased by adults.

Have fun with it. The "cake" will probably get a better response than some people think.




I agree in the fact that RKT are good, but I am wondering if they would be the first to go at the bake sale if they were torted with buttercream, covered in fondant and had sat out for a day or so while decorating.... it doesn't sound the least bit appealing IMO.

Adevag Posted 18 Sep 2010 , 2:10pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by carlamac

This topic is really old, but is the first one that I have found that is somewhat related to my question. I am doing a 4 tier stacked cake for my grandparents 50th. We will have way to much cake. I would like to use RKT for the bottom cake layer (12 in). Would RKT that are comapcted really tight be a good support for the other 3 layers? Is a 12 inch cake stronger or 12 in RKT? I'm new at all of this but I am thinking that RKT would work very well when support is more important that the amount of cake you have?




Even if your RKT "cake" is stronger than a reg. cake, you should still use support in your bottom RKT tier to hold the weight of the upper three tiers.

JawdroppingCakes Posted 18 Sep 2010 , 2:23pm

I agree with the soggy and staleness of the RKT with the buttercream and fondant applied directly to the RKT. I have sort of fixed that when I have to use RKT in some of my cakes. I make the shape I need, which in your case would be a regular pan shape, and then cover it in a thick ganche and smooth it and put it in the fridge to set. Then I take it out and apply the buttercream and then the fondant. This seems to keep the greasiness of the buttercream away from the RKT and it tastes really good. Hope this helps! You can even coat the torted sides and put in a peanut butter filling and sandwhich them together and they are really good like that as well and the ganache on the treats will help it from absorbing any moisture from the filling.

bethasd Posted 18 Sep 2010 , 2:41pm

Ganache & RKT - brilliant! You can use only ganache for crumb coating too and skip the buttercream alltogether.

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