How Do I Get Good Cake Photos?

Decorating By Bossy Updated 29 Mar 2008 , 2:10pm by Bossy

Bossy Posted 27 Mar 2008 , 11:35pm
post #1 of 9

My cake pictures I take to post are not very good. How can I take better pictures?

Liz

8 replies
kettlevalleygirl Posted 27 Mar 2008 , 11:42pm
post #2 of 9

I am not an expert, but I will help get this started!!
I have a digital camera....
I don't use a flash, don't know why but, it doesn't work with a flash.
I use a dark towel, Navy, and also, I have dark drapes, so I place the cake on a dining room table and use the towel or the curtains as a back drop....not the best, but for now...

veejaytx Posted 27 Mar 2008 , 11:52pm
post #3 of 9

I agree that your background is very important, and should be complimentary to your cake colors. No flash is best, natural lighting is much more flattering.

One thing I have learned with my digital camera is to take the photo further away (not trying to get so much of a closeup) but with a high resolution, and then cropping to get your closeup for uploading and/or printing.

HTH a little. Janice

KitchenKat Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 12:02am
post #4 of 9

I use the macro button on my digital camera. It's usually the flower symbol on the dial or menu keys. Within reason this function darkens everything but the subject. I put my cake on a very dark table and shoot from an angle.

gandelmom Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 12:03am
post #5 of 9

this is what I learned:

take picture in the morning next to a window-the light coming in should be behind you-
DO NOT use a flash-

KathleenR Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 12:53am
post #6 of 9

You can soften the light from your flash by putting something over it. In a pinch I have taped a little piece of paper towel over the flash. Sounds a little crazy, but my photography buff DH suggested it. Works for me. I hope it helps you out too.

Petit-four Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 3:40pm
post #7 of 9

If you are in a pinch -- having to take photos in the evening (sometimes we have to, since a cake is due early the next day icon_smile.gif ) - find a plain wall painted white or a soft neutral color. Stand a lamp on the floor, take of the shade and turn it on. The wall will now be "washed" with light.

Next, turn on your overhead light in the room.

Next, pull your table up -- put a cloth on it, or whatever you wish. Something neutral, with little contrast with the wall color. Place the table about 18 inches in front of the lighted wall.

Set the cake on it. Then, place another small lamp (without a shade) on the table, in front of, but offset at an angle to the cake. About 2 feet away.

Take the photo on macro (small flower symbol), using a tripod or back of a kitchen chair to steady it. Make sure the lamps don't show, of course -- you're just using it for a gentle light. Turn off the flash.

Look through the lens -- move the table lamp a few inches back and forth until you get a nice angled "wash" of light.

This method picks up a lot of cake details by allowing angled light to catch the contour of the cake, plus you get an even balance of light around the cake.

Hope this helps!

have_your_cake Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 7:07pm
post #8 of 9

I bought a piece of black velvet from the remnant box at Walmart. I put it over all the junk on my counter and it makes a lovely backdrop. I also put a piece of scotch tape over my flash if I use a flash at all.

Bossy Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 2:10pm
post #9 of 9

Wow! What a lot of great advice! I have always left the flash on, which was probably my biggest mistake. Can't wait to try all these tips out. I'm making a black fondant covered cake this weekend so I'll get to impliment all these idaes.

Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Liz

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