And Then We Wonder How Brides Are Misinformed....

Business By Erdica Updated 29 Mar 2008 , 4:58pm by feliciangel

Erdica Posted 27 Mar 2008 , 2:34pm
post #1 of 21

My mom said she watched this today. I missed the episode but found the article online. It was very interesting...especially under the mini cakes title. How it will save you money by going with mini cakes vs. one large cake. Uhh.....

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/03/27/earlyshow/main3971712.shtml

20 replies
fabfour Posted 27 Mar 2008 , 4:46pm
post #2 of 21

I would like to know where they get their information. It seems like they just make it up as they go along and expect us to follow suit. Just like that one advertisement I see on tv all the time..."We couldn't say it on tv if it wasn't true"

Yeah WHATEVER!!!


Missy

pastrylady Posted 27 Mar 2008 , 11:48pm
post #3 of 21

I watched this. They actually said that the mini cakes are very expensive because they are so labor intensive. Just as I was about to say "right on!" she pointed to the large cake in the back and said something like:

"don't worry, a cake that large doesn't have to be all cake. Some of the tiers are styrofoam"

and then she said it...

"Using styrofoam cakes will save you money. They're cheaper than real cake You can have sheetcakes in the back to serve the rest of the guests"

AARGG!!

TheButterWench Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 12:45am
post #4 of 21

I can't even type I'm too busy laughing

Erdica Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 12:59am
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastrylady

I watched this. They actually said that the mini cakes are very expensive because they are so labor intensive. Just as I was about to say "right on!" she pointed to the large cake in the back and said something like:

"don't worry, a cake that large doesn't have to be all cake. Some of the tiers are styrofoam"

and then she said it...

"Using styrofoam cakes will save you money. They're cheaper than real cake You can have sheetcakes in the back to serve the rest of the guests"

AARGG!!




OMG!!! I would have spit my coffee at the TV at that point. GAH!

justme50 Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 1:06am
post #6 of 21

Then perhaps SHE should make the cake since she knows so much!

I don't even offer dummy cakes, won't do them at all. I used to offer them at the same price as real cake, but finally realized how silly that was so I eliminated them entirely.

They're no cheaper for me and they're a pia to decorate as far as I'm concerned.

SHADDI Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 1:30am
post #7 of 21

did you hear what she said that in NY they go by $30 to $40 a slice i want to move up their.

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 1:36am
post #8 of 21

Erica, thanks for sharing that. That's something I might not have seen otherwise.

And, I know I'm going to be bombarded now with disagreements, but.... isn't it somewhat easier for the baker (and maybe the customer) who wants a grandeur cake, but doesn't need so much cake to have the cake dummies in there instead of just letting so much extra cake go to waste? I would think that I'd much rather decorate something inedible that will be thrown away then to put in the time and effort of baking extra cake and then decorating it only to have it tossed because there was too much extra.

And for what some of those big city cake designers charge, it probably would be cheaper to use the dummy.

Guess I just had it drummed into me not to waste food (yes, to me cake is food!).

beachcakes Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 1:39am
post #9 of 21

$30 - $40 a slice?? Holy Cow!! That's got to be the really big decorators like Ron Ben Israel & Colette Peters!! No way in heck I could get 1/4 of that! I'm only a few hours from the city - for those prices I'd offer free delivery!! LOL

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 1:53am
post #10 of 21

A couple of years ago my DH's cousin got a cake for their son's First Holy Communion from Sylvia Weinstock. It was chocolate and vanilla cake layers with layers of banana and bc fillings. The only real 'special' part of the cake was the gu...er...sugarpaste (I was corrected when I referred to it as gum paste) figurine of the guest of honor in his baseball uniform, standing on grass-piped bc with some dragees thrown around. I don't remember the measurements of the cake (I had forgotten my camer and no matter how many times I've asked them for a picture they never give me one).

My hubby leaned over to me and told me how I could have made one easily that tasted better. It was okay, but that's it. They paid over $1,000 for this cake and I'm guessing it served about 60 or so. She purchased the cake at Ms. Weinstock's shop in NYC.

beachcakes Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 2:01pm
post #11 of 21

For a First Communion???? Wow.

cakedout Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 2:11pm
post #12 of 21

I'm with Grace on the dummy cakes. I will offer to do a dummy cake for the couple that wants the look of the 5 tier cake, but only have 150 guests. 'Course I charge the regular cake price for them! thumbs_up.gif

I know there are those of you that don't like working with styro dummies, but I guess I've done the cake competition circuit long enough that I don't mind working with them. To each his own.

Erdica Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 2:17pm
post #13 of 21

In my personally think very FEW bakers can command $40/serving. And those that can....deserve it. Their skills are rare. But I also think they live in areas where people won't blink an eye at $1000 for a cake that feeds 30. But...you never know. Prices of everything are going up. I paid $1.95/serving for my wedding cake 4 yrs ago. That same baker today is closer to $3.5/serving.

Edited to say:

IndyDebi gave a break down on the cost for dummy cakes and a sheet cake vs the cost of one whole cake. I'll have to see if I can find it. It was very informative.

pastrylady Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 2:32pm
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugar_Plum_Fairy

And, I know I'm going to be bombarded now with disagreements, but.... isn't it somewhat easier for the baker (and maybe the customer) who wants a grandeur cake, but doesn't need so much cake to have the cake dummies in there instead of just letting so much extra cake go to waste?




I don't disagree with you at all on that point. If someone wants five tiers and only has 100 guests, it makes sense to use dummies and not waste cake.

What I objected to was the assertion that's it's cheaper to use dummies and sheet cakes. I charge the same for dummies since buying them costs about the same as buying ingredients and I think they're a PIA to decorate. By the time they pay the same price for the dummy tiers and then buy the sheetcakes, they'll end up paying more money.

Even the decorators that get $40pp would have to charge for the dummies. I can bet you pay them $40pp for their decorating expertise...and there is just as much decorating on a dummy tier as there is on a real tier.

justme50 Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 2:44pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugar_Plum_Fairy

....And, I know I'm going to be bombarded now with disagreements, but.... isn't it somewhat easier for the baker (and maybe the customer) who wants a grandeur cake, but doesn't need so much cake to have the cake dummies in there instead of just letting so much extra cake go to waste? I would think that I'd much rather decorate something inedible that will be thrown away then to put in the time and effort of baking extra cake and then decorating it only to have it tossed because there was too much extra.....




I don't like decorating with dummy cakes, but yes, if you're baking a huge cake, then it's at least faster for the baker to use dummies.

In my case though, my customers always balk at the idea of paying as much for fake cake as they do for real cake. They just don't understand why they would pay the same price for "nothing" as they do the real thing.

There's also something about it being a real cake...I've had lots of comments to the effect of..."wow, that's a cake??", but not once have I ever heard..."wow, that's styrofoam???" icon_lol.gif

And finally, I just don't have a problem with whatever the customer does with my cakes after I deliver them. Whether they save the extra or throw it in the trash...I just don't care. Usually here though, people are more than happy to divide up the leftovers and take them home!

TheButterWench Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 2:57pm
post #16 of 21

Bah, I will do a dummy cake and "rent" it out. Then I have an excuse to have a display cake if it comes back in good condition.

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 3:10pm
post #17 of 21

If I did a wedding cake, or a large party cake and had to use a dummy, I would also go the rental route. Chances are you're goint to have the customer put a deposit on the base and support system, so why not include the dummy also? At least that's my thought.

CoutureCake Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 5:53pm
post #18 of 21

Ugh... One just has to wonder where this stuff is coming from that they're feeding brides. Yea, $40-50/slice icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif um, yea, I think that's even high for Margaret Braun and the others in NYC from the numbers I've seen coming out of there ($8-13 yea, more than that, nada).

Here's the thing, if a bride & groom want a monster of a cake for their cutting because they're only having 100 guests... Wedding slices are unrealistically small, double the size of the slice, and get the cake for 200... Guests will just think they got a piece of cake for dessert. The reality is that in the rest of the world outside of the NYC office building brides have teeny tiny budgets. Cake won't be wasted if the cutter cuts the larger slices. Also, there are many charities that will accept leftover wedding cake if you call and make arrangements ahead of time.

Then my real question.... Unless the cake sucks, WHO on earth has leftover wedding cake??????? Even my cousin who had enough wedding cake to feed close to 800 REAL slices (250-300 showed) had maybe an 8" left at the end of the night because they brought takehome boxes and told guests before they got up from dinner that there was going to be extra cake for us all to take home a slice or have as a snack.

Denise Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 6:41pm
post #19 of 21

I would never charge less for dummy cakes. They cost the SAME to decorate. My fondant doesn't care if it covers styrofoam, rice krispies or cake! It costs the exact same to make the fondant no matter what it covers. The actual ingredients of the cake is the least of it. A dummy takes the same time, effort and product to decorate as a real cake. The only thing is I don't have to bake it. Not a good trade off for me so I don't offer them at a discount. Now if someone really wanted fake cake - I would make them fake cake but they would be paying my REAL price for it!

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 4:21pm
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoutureCake

Also, there are many charities that will accept leftover wedding cake if you call and make arrangements ahead of time.




This isn't necessarily true. There are many venues that won't do this due to the high rate of litigation in this country in case someone gets sick. And who is the agreement between? The baker and the charity? The venue and the charity? The bride/groom and the charity? Or a mix of all these? I personally think this is the best solution, but because of the high rate of claims in the country (especially in large cities), this is much easier said than done. As a matter of fact (no, I don't normally watch Oprah, but this caught my attention), a couple of weeks ago Oprah did a show about the Freegan Lifestyle - a trend for people to "opt out of the system of high consumerism" and many, if not most, of these people acquire their food from dumpsters in large cities when business close down. I AM NOT ADVOCATING THIS, but these people find food that is perfectly fine. No need for it to have been thrown away. Oprah asked Lisa Ling about her documentary piece, "Why isn't this food just donated if it's still good?" Lisa's answer was that the business are too afraid of lawsuits, so they just throw it away instead. (This is not a direct verbatim quote, but as close as I can remember.)

I'm not arguing; I think it's a great idea, but maybe in today's world just not as easy as it should be.

feliciangel Posted 29 Mar 2008 , 4:58pm
post #21 of 21

why don't you guys comment the article let know with what you think icon_confused.gif(just rolled down to the bottom and realized there are no comment on the article) it only takes a lil bit of info to register....vent all you want there and maybe these people actually writing these things will listen... thumbs_up.gif

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