Fondant Or Gumpaste Daisys

Decorating By Daisys_Cakes Updated 21 Mar 2008 , 1:49am by Daisys_Cakes

Daisys_Cakes Posted 18 Mar 2008 , 1:24pm
post #1 of 9


I was wanting to make fondant daisys but I can't find a tutorial for it. I have the Wilton 4 kit, but since I have yet to take the class I don't have the book. Can any one help me?


8 replies
Daisys_Cakes Posted 18 Mar 2008 , 2:36pm
post #2 of 9

Here is a link to the type of flowers I was talking about:

Do I just cut out 2 shapes and then put them on top of each other or is there more to it?


EGB09302006 Posted 19 Mar 2008 , 2:42pm
post #3 of 9

I'm interested in this answer as well. I want to learn how to do them. On the box it looks like there is more to it than that though.

mysticamethyst Posted 19 Mar 2008 , 3:03pm
post #4 of 9

I was just coming in to find a tutorial on daisies or gerbera daisies HELP US PLEASE lol thanks in advance.


kellycakes4949 Posted 19 Mar 2008 , 3:03pm
post #5 of 9

It is basically as easy as that. Cut out your two pieces in fondant/gumpaste. Gently run a line down the centre of each petal using your veining tool, this will slightly curl the petals. Lightly brush the centre of the bottom piece with clear vanilla and adhere the second piece on top. Finally, add a yellow dot in the centre with royal icing. Give yourself a couple of days to let dry really well (more if using fondant rather than gumpaste). I hope this all makes sense!

cohenandlillysmom Posted 19 Mar 2008 , 3:11pm
post #6 of 9

Hi guys, I too needed the answer to this question a few weeks ago and did find it in a forum but since the crash Im sure its gone. So here is what I learned...

The wilton cutters are not my first choice... I think the ones that were talked about on the forum I read were from sunflower sugar art. They have really nice big ones.

Anyways, So you roll out your fondant and then cut 2 flowers. Then you take a the veining tool (Link below) and run it down each petal to get the crease in the middle and the edges to "curl" up. Do the same for the other flower and then use water or a little RI to stick together and put your yellow center on, I use RI.

I hope this helps... I learned all this too late and had to use FAKE FLOWERS! I didnt have the right cutters, so try the wilton ones and if you dont like them I would try the sunflower sugar art

Daisys_Cakes Posted 19 Mar 2008 , 8:20pm
post #7 of 9

Thanks everyone for your information! Unfortunately I needed that information yesterday since this was a last minute cake, but fortunately I PMed the person who made the daisys in the picture I posted and she replied immediately. Here is what she said for the other people who said were interested in this:

"Roll out the gumpaste very thin, less than 1/16 of an inch. If there's writing on your rolling surface, you should be able to see it. Cut two daisy shapes for each flower. Move one at a time (keeping the other covered) to the thin foam. Make sure you dust the thin foam with a mixture of half cornstarch, half icing sugar (a dusting pouch is included in your course kit). Using the "heel" end of the ball tool, gently draw a line down each petal, starting from the point and moving toward the center. This will thin and curl the petals. Make sure you don't press too hard, or you will get holes in the petals. This is the hardest thing to describe in words only. Then, use a little gum glue (made from 1/4 tsp gumpaste dissolved in 1 tbsp of water) in the center of one shape, and place the other on top, making sure the petals of the top one are between the petals of the bottom. Then roll a small ball of yellow gumpaste for the center. Brush a little gum glue on one side, and dip it into yellow cake sparkles (optional). Use a little gum glue to attach the center to the daisy. Voila! Most of the daisies on my cake used the medium sized cutter, but you can also make large or teeny tiny ones."

addietx Posted 19 Mar 2008 , 8:30pm
post #8 of 9

Do you dry them flat and they stay curled or do you dry in formers? Looks like they are slightly curled on the ends.

Daisys_Cakes Posted 21 Mar 2008 , 1:49am
post #9 of 9

The edges are curled when you use the veining tool, so I don't think formers are necessary.


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