Runny Curd Help

Decorating By smbegg Updated 16 Mar 2008 , 2:06pm by smbegg

smbegg Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 5:04am
post #1 of 5

Ok, so I do not like anything citrus, but gave it and made Lemon Curd today after hearing all y'all raving about it. I made it and it seems a bit runny. I just put it in the fridge for the night. Will it firm up enough to use as a filling in a cake tomorrow or am I screwed?? It is not liquid, just soupy. I followed the directions to a T. Is there anyway to thicken it more now?

Funny though, I can actually tolerate the taste!



4 replies
kelleym Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 5:21am
post #2 of 5

It will firm up a *little* in the fridge because of the butter content, but what it sounds like is that you didn't cook it quite long enough for the eggs to solidify. When you take it off the stove, it should be the consistency of pudding.

The first time I ever made curd I made that mistake, and it was so thin/soupy I couldn't use it as filling, so I ended up poking holes in my cake with a dowel and pouring the curd all over it and letting it soak in like simple syrup. It was delicious.... icon_lol.gif

smbegg Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 5:37am
post #3 of 5

The recipe I made warned only to get the mixture as thick as coating a spoon! ARRGGGHHHH I don't have time or ingredients to make again..... I hope this works and gets thicker!


kelleym Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 5:59am
post #4 of 5

Just taking a guess here, was the recipe you followed Alton Brown's? I ask because I also followed that recipe for my first failed attempt at curd, and the directions say to cook it until it coats the back of a spoon. Well, mine DID coat the back of a spoon, but it was NOT done. Since then, I've abandoned Alton's recipe (the Lord knows I love him, but sometimes he makes things too complicated for no reason) and have been using Ina Garten's, which is infinitely simpler, and equally delicious. Here it is:


1/4-pound (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
4 extra-large eggs
3 extra-large egg yolks
1/4 cup finely grated lemon zest (6 to 8 lemons)
1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

Cream the butter and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment for 1 minute. On low speed, add the eggs and egg yolks one at a time, and then add the lemon zest, lemon juice, and salt. Don't worry; it will look curdled.

Pour the mixture into a small saucepan and cook over medium-low heat for 8 to 10 minutes, until thick, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Whisk briskly when it starts to thicken and cook over low heat for 1 to 2 minutes, whisking constantly. Don't allow it to boil! It will be 175 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer. Pour into a bowl and cool to room temperature.

You'll notice that you first cream all the ingredients together in a mixer, then move them straight to a saucepan (no double boiler) and cook until it thickens, which is right around 170-175 degrees (I used my instant read thermometer a few times until I knew for sure how it was supposed to look).

As far as your current problem - I don't see any reason you couldn't pour your soupy mixture into a saucepan and cook it over low heat, whisking constantly, until it thickens to the right consistency. You will know when it gets there - it takes about 10 minutes, depending on your heat, and when it happens, it happens very quickly, turning from thin liquid to hot pudding. Disclaimer - I've never actually done it, so I can't guarantee it would work, but it's what I would do. Also, because you may not have cooked it to the right temperature the first time, you may not have killed any salmonella, on the rare chance (1/20,000) that you got an infected egg.

Good luck, hon. icon_smile.gif

smbegg Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 2:06pm
post #5 of 5

No, I used Martha Stewarts, and it is completely set this morning! Yeah. I am going to start filling in minutes!


Quote by @%username% on %date%