Please Help!! What Would You Do?! I Messed Up!!

Decorating By mom2spunkynbug Updated 20 Mar 2008 , 3:00pm by costumeczar

mom2spunkynbug Posted 15 Mar 2008 , 3:50pm
post #1 of 17

2 weeks ago this guy (he owns the wedding planning business I became a member of last year) asked me to make a cheesecake for his wife. I told him I had never done one, but that I would do a test run & if that came out ok, I would do one for him. He decided on a choc cheesecake.

I did the test run - it was great BUT I used a ready-to-use/premade pie crust. Anyway, I called him and told him I could do it. He said "Oh, I forgot that she gave up chocolate for lent - could you just do a plain one" I was like icon_mad.gificon_mad.gificon_mad.gif I had already bought ingredients x2 to make the choc cheesecake. But I said ok.

So I never made a test run of the plain cheesecake.

So this time I made the crust myself and used a springform pan. It said to put the pan in a roasting pan with some water. I followed the directions and everything. Well it just doesn't LOOK right, if you know what I mean. I used foil around the springform pan, but water still got into it!? icon_confused.gif So now parts of the crust are soggy?! icon_cry.gif

Ok, now WHAT WOULD YOU DO?!?! I am supposed to deliver this between 1 & 2:00 today!!! icon_cry.gif Ok, that's in 1-2 hours!!

Please help, I don't know what to do. I'm almost tempted to go to this cheesecake store in town & just buy one from there & tell him that it did not work out. Or should I just not charge him for the one I made? I don't know!!

I know I am never doing this again! icon_redface.gif

16 replies
mom2spunkynbug Posted 15 Mar 2008 , 4:06pm
post #2 of 17

Does anyone have any advice - please???

veejaytx Posted 15 Mar 2008 , 5:11pm
post #3 of 17

That is a tough situation, sorry you have had that experience.

I'm not a cheesecake baker, so can't help much, but I think rather than give him a product you aren't happy with, maybe you should just tell him you aren't happy with it and give him the option of taking it (free if you feel like that is fair) or his purchasing a cake somewhere else.

Hope you can work it out for both of you. Janice

michellenj Posted 15 Mar 2008 , 7:00pm
post #4 of 17

Yikes. What did you end up doing?

AJsGirl Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 1:45pm
post #5 of 17

Sounds like whoever wrote those directions didn't know much about springform pans. icon_confused.gif

I use a springform pan with parchment on the bottom. Springform pans don't really seal all the way around, so I don't put mine directly in the water, or else water will get in the pan (which I guess you figured out already icon_redface.gif). I just put a pan of water on the rack below the springform pan. Am I explaining that right?

Don't give up on cheesecake, I love doing them, and you will get them! thumbs_up.gif

mom2spunkynbug Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 10:12pm
post #6 of 17

Thanks everyone. I ended up giving it to him for free. I told him I had problems with it, and that if it was bad I would make him another one (after I had "practiced" a bit).

I will NOT use the water-bath method anymore, that's for sure! I don't want to give up on cheesecakes either 'cause I love 'em too much! LOL

Anyway, he said that it looked good...and he's going to let me know how it was on Monday. (I SO HOPE it tasted ok!)

springlakecake Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 10:29pm
post #7 of 17

I hear ya! I had a similar situation where someone asked me to make a cheesecake and I really wasnt confident. I ended up making it (I also did the water bath. It worked but you have to use a couple of layers of foil.) Anyway I ended up giving it to the lady, but I didnt really know how it turned out until I made another one. It tasted great, but it really wasnt done in the middle thumbsdown.gif Anyway the lady told my mom that it tasted really good, but I have a sneaky suspicion that it really hadnt set up completely. I felt kind of bad, but the lady knew I didnt really make cheesecakes. I dont think I would make another until I was confident about baking times!

costumeczar Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 10:54pm
post #8 of 17

Just for future reference, if you ever decide to do another cheesecake, you don't have to use springform pans for them. Just use a regular cake pan but line the bottom with parchment or a silicone liner. When you take them out of the oven run a kinfe around the upper edge to release it from the pan, because when it cools off it will shrink, and if the upper edge is stuck to the pan that makes it crack. Cool them off completely and put them in the fridge to chill, then when you're reday to de-pan them (they have to be completely cold) hold the bottom of the pan over a hot burner (not directly on it, just really close) to warm the bottom up a little. Run a knife around the edge of the cheesecake just like a regular cake to release it from the sides of the pan, and you should be able to turn it out onto a board or a cookie sheet, then flip it over right side up if it has a crust. I make cheesecake wedding cakes (I have one coming up this weekend, I might have to make some extra for myself to eat...Quality control, you know icon_twisted.gif ) and I do two-layered ones with a layer of meringue buttercream in them. The meringue buttercream will stick on them if you ice them on the outside with it, but confectioner's sugar buttercreams won't. So some I do with a crust, and some without. If you turn the pan over and it doesn't come out right away, just warm it up a little more until it comes out without you having to bang the pan or anything! Since the pans won't leak, you can put them directly into the water bath and it works fine.

joaaaann Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 10:59pm
post #9 of 17

Well you know...I made my first cheesecake in the 'bath' in the roasting pan as well a couple months back. I thought I followed the recipe to a T but I had gotten the graham cracker crusts wet too. It tasted awful but the cheese cake was sure beautiful! Anyway I trimmed away about 2 inches of edging cuz beyond that my crust was dry (Thank God for that cuz I was craving cheese cake WITH crust the way a pregnant woman craves pickles with everything! That wet crust was far too nasty for me to ignore tho haha). The next time, 2 weeks later, I used the extra long roll of heavy duty tin foil and I made an oreo crust this time ( holding my breath the whole time) and wa-la! It came out perfect! I haven't made another yet. It was too good and I ate so much I made myself sick. So I don't know when I'll try again but I'm glad for the experience.

tonimarie Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 11:07pm
post #10 of 17

icon_smile.gif Sorry about how it turned out......I make cheesecakes all the time and I don't use a hot water bath at all and they turn out just fine. I do know that it takes longer than the recipe says to cook them through.

JoJoMick Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 11:16pm
post #11 of 17

Gads . . . I've also done this same thing with a cheesecake! It just KILLS me when I've done something that works (I've made alot of cheesecakes!) forever and then I get a hair-brained idea to do it different. I usually bake a cheesecake in the oven with a pan of hot water underneath it - - - so why would I do the hot water bath method?!?!? and use only 1 layer of foil?!?!??! and the water leaked into the crust?!?!?!?!?! on a first-time client?!?!?!??!?! I just did nothing. She had ordered 2 other items as well . . . and I did it sort of at the last minute (no time to do another one) and I wish I would've thought to go to Costco to get one and tell her the truth!!!!! I've felt bad about it since - - - many times. This has been since the first of December - - should I let it go?

ZAKIA6 Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 11:23pm
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Just for future reference, if you ever decide to do another cheesecake, you don't have to use springform pans for them. Just use a regular cake pan but line the bottom with parchment or a silicone liner. When you take them out of the oven run a kinfe around the upper edge to release it from the pan, because when it cools off it will shrink, and if the upper edge is stuck to the pan that makes it crack. Cool them off completely and put them in the fridge to chill, then when you're reday to de-pan them (they have to be completely cold) hold the bottom of the pan over a hot burner (not directly on it, just really close) to warm the bottom up a little. Run a knife around the edge of the cheesecake just like a regular cake to release it from the sides of the pan, and you should be able to turn it out onto a board or a cookie sheet, then flip it over right side up if it has a crust. I make cheesecake wedding cakes (I have one coming up this weekend, I might have to make some extra for myself to eat...Quality control, you know icon_twisted.gif ) and I do two-layered ones with a layer of meringue buttercream in them. The meringue buttercream will stick on them if you ice them on the outside with it, but confectioner's sugar buttercreams won't. So some I do with a crust, and some without. If you turn the pan over and it doesn't come out right away, just warm it up a little more until it comes out without you having to bang the pan or anything! Since the pans won't leak, you can put them directly into the water bath and it works fine.




this is interesting. do you make stacked cheesecake wedding cakes?

lorrieg Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 11:26pm
post #13 of 17

I use the hot water bath all the time with my cheesecakes (I have a recipe in the files here) and have only recently started putting foil around the springform pans. Guess I've been lucky. My pans seal really well. A double layer of foil works.

I would think that you are really steaming the cake when you put the pan on the rack below with water in it? Anyone know about that? A bain marie has always worked with my cakes and I never get cracks and the cake is cooked nicely and browned just the right amount.

Now having said that I have to make one for this weekend and it will probably be a soggy mess. icon_rolleyes.gif

JoJoMick Posted 16 Mar 2008 , 11:29pm
post #14 of 17

I also was wondering . . . .what do you do about cutting a cheesecake wedding cake? They are a bear to cut - - - I do use hot water and clean my knife with each cut, but how is it done professionally? (Sorry to "cut in" here . . . )

costumeczar Posted 17 Mar 2008 , 12:00am
post #15 of 17

Hi- I do stacked cheesecakes, and they work fine, but they're soft to cut. You could use unflavored dental floss to cut them, if you just hold it tight with one hand on either side of the cheesecake, then pull it through to the bottom it should go all the way through the cheesecake part, then you just have to cut the crust with the cake knife when you take the pieces off. Don't try them if it's hot outside, though, because they just get too soft and don't cut well, and the catering staff will hate you! When I do a stacked one, I put a crust on the bottom layer, then the meringue buttercream, then an un-crusted top layer, then ice it and dowel it like a normal cake. It's a little easier to do them with push-through pillars and individual plates, though, because then you don't have to worry about anything softening up and shifting. I'm sure you've probably seen their website, but go to http://www.elegantcheesecakes.com to see some wedding cake cheesecakes.

jamiemichelle Posted 19 Mar 2008 , 11:41pm
post #16 of 17

Costumeczar, how big of a cheesecake do you do? Can you make a 12 or 14 inch one? Will it get done in the center? Do you have a good recipe you would recommend? I am going to have to try this soon; love the idea I don't have to use a springform pan. That website was amazing! Wish I could afford to have one shipped here!

costumeczar Posted 20 Mar 2008 , 3:00pm
post #17 of 17

Ai yi yi, today is cheesecake baking day and I put too many eggs in the first batch icon_mad.gif . Now I have to wait to see what happens when they cool down to decide whether I need to do them over icon_mad.gificon_mad.gificon_mad.gif

Anyway, to answer your question...I think that you can do any size without the springform, but the bigger they are the riskier it is to get them out of the pan because you have to turn it upside-down. The ones I'm doing today are 6,9 and 13", and I think that 14" is about the largest I would do. I overbake them a little so that they're slightly more set than I'd usually do for one that I was just going to eat at home, then I leave them in the fridge in the pan until it's time to decorate them. That way they're nice and solid when I'm trying to take them out. The most important thing when you're taking them out of the pans is to remember that if they don't come out easily (after you warm up the bottom of the pan on the stove) you need to warm the bottom over the burner more, don't try to tap the pan a lot to get them out. They should come out fairly easily, don't force it. To get the big ones done in the centers I use the flower nail method to distribute the heat toward the center (I used two nails in the 13" one today.) Usually you're supposed to bake them until the center is still a little jiggly compared to the rest of it, but I bake them until the entire thing is pretty set to make sure it will hold up in a wedding cake arrangement.

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