Moist cake mix cakes

Baking By m0use Updated 26 Oct 2005 , 8:46pm by m0use

letseatcake Posted 24 Feb 2005 , 9:13pm
post #31 of 89

PLEASE HELP icon_cry.gifI tried the coffee cream idea, but my edges came out dry. What did I do wrong? I believe I used butter instead of oil. Do I start with a pudding cake mix, oil cake mix or butter recipe cake mix? What brand of cake mix did you use? I prefer Duncan Hines, but I will use Bettry Crocker in a bind or to try a new flavor they might have. I really love this idea there are some great flavors of cream. I'm wanting more cake orders so I can try them all.

PLEASE HELP icon_biggrin.gif

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 24 Feb 2005 , 9:35pm
post #32 of 89

Not sure. I automatically bake my cakes at 325 instead of 350. That helps ALL cakes.

Don't trash that cake!!!! Just use simple syrup around the edges where it's dry. It will fix it up in a jiffy. REALLYY!!!!

letseatcake Posted 24 Feb 2005 , 9:47pm
post #33 of 89

Thank you, I have 3 cakes for this weekend. I will try again

icon_biggrin.gif

m0use Posted 25 Feb 2005 , 3:33pm
post #34 of 89

here is the website for the cake mix doctor: www.cakemixdoctor.com
You can sign up for newsletters on this site and read reviews as well.

-TenderHeart Posted 5 Mar 2005 , 3:16pm
post #35 of 89

You use butter instead of oil. Do you melt the butter, then? Thank you. icon_smile.gif

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 5 Mar 2005 , 5:22pm
post #36 of 89

I'm not sure who you're asking, TenderHeart. But I can give you may response.

I use butter in place of oil for most cakes. If I have forgotten to allow the butter to come to room temperature, I throw it in the microwave for a few seconds. It's very soft but still cool to the touch.

If I happen to over-nuke it, I just let is sit a few minutes (doesn't take long) until it's cooled down enough. It can be lukewarm, just not hot.

-TenderHeart Posted 5 Mar 2005 , 5:31pm
post #37 of 89

You were the one I was asking, yes, I thought I had included your name in my subject line when I posted, sorry about that. icon_smile.gif

PurplePetunia Posted 10 Mar 2005 , 4:51am
post #38 of 89

Cali4dawn,
Can you please share your simple syrup recipe and basic directions for using it???

Thanks!

Mchelle Posted 10 Mar 2005 , 3:04pm
post #39 of 89

Thanks a million for all of the info. I must have previously missed this conversation. I agree completely on paying for what you want and everything coming at a price. If you really want to stand out from the pack. I have had people ask why is your cake so expensive, Wal-Mart is cheaper.....then go to Wal-Mart! If you can get what I make at Wal-Mart, then I am doing something wrong. Most of my clients say it's the best cake they have ever tasted! So I know there is a difference.

I'm not from the south and buying your cake at the same place you get your tires, is not my idea of a good bakery cake thumbsdown.gif
I think the coffee creamer is a great idea. I'm going to try that on my next experiment. thumbs_up.gif
Thanks for listening to my ranting!

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 10 Mar 2005 , 8:22pm
post #40 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracey4

Cali4dawn,
Can you please share your simple syrup recipe and basic directions for using it???

Thanks!




Basic Simple Syrup is used when you just want to make a cake moist but not change its flavor. For a standard 9*13 or (2) 8-9 inch rounds: Boil 1 cup of water. Add 1 cup table sugar (white sugar). Dissolve all sugar. Allow to cool. Can be used warm, just not boiling hot.

I use a pastry brush, some people use a squeeze bottle to use it o the cake. Using a pastry brush just keep brushing it on all over the cake (or where ever you need it) until it's all gone. If you using a squeeze bottle, do the same. Yo may need all of it, but don;t be afraid of using that much on your cake. It really won't hurt a dry cake.

Now all that being said....

You can also use coffee syrups, fruit juices and a slew of other products. I've also used watered down jams. Obviously this will change the flavor of your cakes. With the exception of the watered down jams, do not add boiling water. Just use as is. Oh yeah! Fancy Liqueurs such as Bailey's, Kahlua, Amaretto, etc also work great!!

PurplePetunia Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 4:49am
post #41 of 89

Thanks Dawn!
You're always such a great help!

Is that to be used only for dry cakes, or can it be used on a moist cake to add flavour??

midwestmom Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 6:03pm
post #42 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mchelle

I'm not from the south and buying your cake at the same place you get your tires, is not my idea of a good bakery cake.




Ouch thumbsdown.gifAgreeing with the second half of your statement, just not so sure about the first.....

Mchelle Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 6:06pm
post #43 of 89

Sorry, I don't mean to offend anyone. icon_redface.gif

southerncake Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 6:45pm
post #44 of 89
Quote:
Quote:

Mchelle wrote:
I'm not from the south and buying your cake at the same place you get your tires, is not my idea of a good bakery cake.


Ouch
Agreeing with the second half of your statement, just not so sure about the first.....





I'm afraid I have to agree with Midwestmom on this one.

I am from the south, but am not compelled to buy tires and cake together! icon_biggrin.gif

Mchelle Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 6:51pm
post #45 of 89

I guess that I should clarify myself and in the future not make a broad statement. I certainly did not mean to imply that all southerns buy cakes with their tires. I am only speaking of the people I have happen to have this conversation with. Definately not every Southerner. Please excuse me, again I apologize.

midwestmom Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 8:38pm
post #46 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mchelle

I certainly did not mean to imply that all southerns buy cakes with their tires.




LOL, that statement made me almost spit tea out of my nose icon_smile.gifSorry to be so touchy...
You didn't offend me, just found the statement a little odd.
No bid deal. icon_smile.gif

linnburg Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 9:16pm
post #47 of 89

When I use syrup, I place it in a zip-lock bag, cut just a teeny bit off the corner, and use this to squirt onto the cake. I can then throw away the baggie without the sticky mess!

Sandi

Mchelle Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 9:20pm
post #48 of 89

I'm glad that you brought it to my attention. icon_smile.gif

nanni Posted 11 Mar 2005 , 10:33pm
post #49 of 89

I think you have the South and REDNECK in the same store-and I know plenty of REDNECKS and southerners and there is a difference!...none of them bad-just different. That's what makes the world go round!

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 14 Mar 2005 , 5:49pm
post #50 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracey4

Thanks Dawn!
You're always such a great help!

Is that to be used only for dry cakes, or can it be used on a moist cake to add flavour??




You got it!! Either way.....

Just remember it adds moisture... don't make your cake so moist it falls apart.

thecakemaker Posted 14 Mar 2005 , 6:53pm
post #51 of 89

Well, I made my first hot milk cake on Saturday. Everthing I had read said it should be light and fluffy. Mine was not! The recipe called for 45 min to 1 hour at 350 deg. I baked for 45 min at 325 and it was too much! I tore through this site lookng for this post. It was a life saver! I poured (brushed on) one cup of simple syrup and it was great per the requestor of the cake when we ate it yesterday.

Thank You!
Debbie thumbs_up.gif

tcturtleshell Posted 14 Mar 2005 , 8:02pm
post #52 of 89

I was going to comment about the syrup... (Before I read the redneck thing.. I'll comment on that in a minute icon_lol.gifBayou State! Biscuits are soooo good w/ it on them. thumbs_up.gifYA'LL HAVE A NICE DAY!!! cowboy.gif

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 14 Mar 2005 , 9:02pm
post #53 of 89

There are lots of rednecks here in California (more than when I lived in NC) and nothing worse than a Yankee redneck(I'm originally from Ohio)!!

I've seen them all......

nanni Posted 14 Mar 2005 , 9:35pm
post #54 of 89

I'm from New England and live in Ky!! It seems they always put the "best of the best" on tv when there is an interview regarding a tragedy-real boost to what others think of the south/southeast! But if we were all the same-what a dreary world this would be (but sometimes it is quite embarrasing anyway!)

cakelady1994 Posted 14 Mar 2005 , 10:18pm
post #55 of 89

hi. i've lived in ky all my 44 years and i'm not offended by the comment.i agree with ninni when it come to interviews thy find the dumbest person thy can to talk to. that makes the rest of us look dumb. tcturtle shell when i was young we use the same stuff on our biscuits to. it must be a country folk thing.( county folk can survive anything)lol icon_lol.gif

flayvurdfun Posted 18 Mar 2005 , 8:13am
post #56 of 89

hmmm, using creamer.....thats an idea!!!!!!

m0use Posted 18 Mar 2005 , 3:52pm
post #57 of 89

I just made a buttermilk spice cake the other day from the cake mix doctor book- very moist but a little too crumbly for me, maybe I will add an extra egg and a little more oil next time.
So buttermilk works good too. I am going to try a buttermilk chocolate cake for a bridal shower cake that I have to make for March 26th, so we wil see how that turns out as well.

Mchelle Posted 18 Mar 2005 , 6:32pm
post #58 of 89

You all are too funny icon_biggrin.gif

GHOST_USER_NAME Posted 18 Mar 2005 , 6:46pm
post #59 of 89

I used to strictly use buttermilk before I discovered the creamers.

AgentCakeBaker Posted 19 Mar 2005 , 11:54pm
post #60 of 89

Cali4dawn

I'm going to try using a french vanilla creamer from Coffeemate instead of milk. I can already taste it melting in my mouth.

You mentioned that you could add fancy liquers to the simple syrup. How much of the liquer do you add to the water and sugar mixture?

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