Wrapping a cake in chocolate by ShirleyW

Decorating By stephanie214 Updated 13 Mar 2014 , 8:27pm by ellavanilla

sugarmagiccakes Posted 9 Jul 2013 , 1:06am
post #211 of 222

I would make the chocolate dancers first then stick them to your cake when theyre set. Think this method is great for larger pieces of chocolate, i will try it myself. thanks for all the great info.
 

sugarmagiccakes Posted 9 Jul 2013 , 1:08am
post #212 of 222

I would make the chocolate dancers first then stick them to your cake when theyre set. Think this method is great for larger pieces of chocolate, i will try it myself. thanks for all the great info.
 

sugarmagiccakes Posted 9 Jul 2013 , 1:09am
post #213 of 222

sorry clicked twice. i am a newbie

ButtercreamG Posted 9 Jul 2013 , 1:23am
post #214 of 222

I actually tried it myself since my cake was due last month. I found that if you let your chocolate dry before putting it on the cake, it will break when you're trying to put it on the sides of the cake because it doesn't really adjust well around the curve of the cake.

 

I ended up doing the chocolate dancers on a parchment paper and then sticking them onto the cake while they were still wet, but firm (just like you would for a chocolate transfer). It worked well :) Here's my pic from that cake :)

Sweety Grane Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 5:54am
post #215 of 222

thanks Stephanie for posting .. I can't wait to try this! a have a masterpiece myself. :)

Maribelle Posted 1 Nov 2013 , 9:20pm
post #216 of 222

Thanks!

boredcap Posted 14 Nov 2013 , 1:16pm
post #217 of 222

Nice! I want to try this. You know I really like Cakes:-) 

GingerPopsSA Posted 21 Jan 2014 , 4:11pm
post #218 of 222

Thank you for the info! I've always seemed to struggle with wrapping chocolate around a cake... just can't seem to judge if the consistency is ready for moving or not.

My solution is fun though and also eliminates the seam.

 

1. Use the same plastic as mentioned by Stephanie214.

 

2. Cut the strip of plastic to the desired height, perhaps taller than the cake by a cm or so.

3. Grease a cake tin that is a bit wide than the cake (unless you are doing to trim the edges of the cake, in which case use the original cake tin you baked it in.

 

4.Place the strip of plastic into the cake tin making sure it doesn't flap up away from the sides.

 

5.Melt the chocolate to a thin consistency and spread it around the inside of the plastic and allow to set 100% before applying more layers. Be sure to spread the chocolate all the way to the base. The butter/shortening will keep it from sticking and it will give the cake something to weight the collar down with once you put the cake in.

 

*Note:

I find that if I allow the chocolate to set properly before applying each layer there is less "streaking" on the chocolate.

 

Once all of the layers have been spread and set, gently turn lift the plastic and chocolate tube out of the cake tin. Carefully remove the plastic and voila. You have a cake collar.

 

6. Place it over the layered and iced cake and pipe in more icing between the gap. ( If your cake is already covered in buttercream, then a bitter sweet ganache could be piped in around it? This is a first attempt after horribly failing the wrap around technique. I piped scribble lines, and realised it would break to easily and just smeared chocolate over it. I was pleasantly surprised by the end result. .

 

After practising however, I used the technique (minus the scribbling part) and this was the final result.

 

Ps. The roses were organised from an organic farmer banning all pesticides aside from chilli spray and all stems we wrapped really well before applying to the cake. It was the brides request to put them on so we came to a compromise.

chrysanthy Posted 24 Jan 2014 , 6:11am
post #219 of 222

Thanks stephanie, this is great!

rex00 Posted 27 Feb 2014 , 8:09am
post #220 of 222

Thanks Shirley......!!!

I can't wait to try this! It's so elegant!

your cake is fabulous and makes my mouth water!! 
mmumsie...I like yours too! :-D:grin:

 

http://www.saugaat.in/18/cakes

alexfrancis Posted 11 Mar 2014 , 6:01pm
post #221 of 222

my customer is having a big party. They are organic types. Is there any organic method by which to do this process?

 

Thanks

ellavanilla Posted 13 Mar 2014 , 8:27pm
post #222 of 222

Quote:

Originally Posted by alexfrancis 
 

my customer is having a big party. They are organic types. Is there any organic method by which to do this process?

 

Thanks

 

 

use organic chocolate. what else?

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