Anyone Tried Lard??

Baking By DelightsByE Updated 25 Oct 2010 , 1:53pm by milkmaid42

lorrieg Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:14am
post #31 of 158

Oh I forgot to add that poutine might kill you faster than eating buckets of bacon and I am being paid back every day for calling my brother "lardbottom" when he was younger by having to haul one around of my own every day. icon_razz.gif

Junecakes Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:16am
post #32 of 158

POUTINE!!! Now you're talking! L-O-V-E it!

sun33082 Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:17am
post #33 of 158

So is anyone going to try this?

I highly doubt bacon grease or lard drippings are going to be good in icing, but I'm curious about the pure white stuff from the grocery store.

Karabear1125 Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:15am
post #34 of 158

mmm nothing like eggs cooked in bacon grease! Anyways, I have used lard in my pie crusts and like another poster said it makes THE BEST crust and there is no "lardy" aftertaste or whatever you wanna call it.

lorrieg Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:16am
post #35 of 158

I'd be willing but I don't have any lard or a kitchen right now and won't for 10 days. I'd love to know how it turns out. It would a cheap experiment.

sugarlove Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:21am
post #36 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodthi32

hmm, well I guess butter (IMBC, Swiss buttercream, or any TRUE buttercream) is a no go since its made from animal (beef) fat. Taste mighty darn good to me.



Well, actually milkfat is not at all like the body fat of an animal.......I thought of that initially too, though........
Although, I love cooking with bacon grease so much, I might just eat icing made with it!! icon_biggrin.gif[/quote]

fat is fat no matter where it comes from it's still fat. Milk,butter, and cream are all cow products with varying amounts of animal fat with butter having the most fat content of the three.

missmersh Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:23am
post #37 of 158

Uh, what is Poutine?

justme50 Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:32am
post #38 of 158

I don't know what lard will do as far as icing is concerned, but health issues aside, it makes the best biscuits you'll ever taste.

My grandmother made biscuits using lard and OMG, they were out of this world. Back in her time, no one worried about all the things we worry about today.

She kept a bowl of flour sitting out on her cabinet 24 hours a day. When she wanted to make biscuits, she made a well in the center of the bowl, threw in some lard, mixed it around and added buttermilk until she got the amount of dough she wanted. Afterwards, she just threw more flour in the same bowl and left it sitting until the next time. I've never been able to match her biscuits, but it sure isn't for a lack of trying.

I have a recipe for orange refrigerator cookies that I've been using for well over 30 years that make the most outrageously delicious cookies you could ask for and it calls for lard. I tried butter and shortening, but they tasted like garbage.

Lard also gives baked goods like cookies and biscuits a crispy outer texture you can't get any other way.

I have no idea what the odd taste would be from using lard unless it's from using lard that has gone rancid. The only reason I don't use it on a regular basis is simply the fact that it's so darn bad for you. But I still keep it on hand and every once in a great while say what the heck!

And nope, we didn't grow up poor. lol

crisseyann Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:26am
post #39 of 158

Oh boy, frying eggs in bacon grease....takes me WAY back! Mom use to make them, we called them "Lacy Eggs" because they were so crisp and lacy around the edges. YUM!

MOBOGAL Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:35am
post #40 of 158

Hello icon_smile.gif

I recently tried a BC icing recipe from another site that called for "pre-creamed shortening". I finally found it at the grocery store, and turns out pre-creamed shortening is a mixture of animal and vegetable fats. It is VERY stiff and bright white. The icing tasted delicious, and was light and fluffy, but the mouth feel wasn't for me (I don't like all shortening icing). So this might be an alternative to just using straight lard...maybe mix reg shortening with pre-creamed to get the trans fats? Just a suggestion! I was kinda weirded out about the lard idea too, until my mom reminded me that until 2 years ago, our favorite local bakery used lard in their icing!

Juds2323 Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:37am
post #41 of 158

My grandma's cookies are made with Lard. No one have even tried to sub it with anything.... If it ain't broke don't fix it..... Gram had 9 kids and at least 45 grandkids and those cookies were rationed out..... MMMMMM.... I did have lard for one of my attempts and ended up tossing it and buying fresh when it had gotten really warm and then solidified again. It had a strong bacon smell then but I think as long as you don't try and use it in too warm of weather it might not be too bad.

Judi

lorrieg Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:33am
post #42 of 158

missmersh, poutine is french fries smothered in cheese curds and gravy. That's the original French Canadian way to make it. You buy them out of chip wagons on the side of the road usually. I've seen them more and more places these days and my son saw them in NYC. They cost a whole lot more though! icon_surprised.gif

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:37am
post #43 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorrieg

missmersh, poutine is french fries smothered in cheese curds and gravy.




Oh my goodness, I've never heard of these but they sound delicious!!

GI Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:38am
post #44 of 158

Hate to admit this...I already tried the lard. icon_eek.gif I was going for a fluffier, stiffer, whiter, all-around taste-out-of-this-world icing. It was downright nasty. I threw it out. However, I'm not sure if I didn't just try to get it better by throwing more & more PS into it. So if someone did 1/2 Crisco and 1/2 lard, then perhaps they could post.

I grew up in handme-downs and sack lunches. We lived on a farm. Ate tons of our own home-grown food. But my mother always used Crisco for baking cakes and cookies. Lard was for the hashbrowns, gravy, frying, bisquits, and such.

edited to add: HTH (Now don't get me started on the health factor, because I won't go there. But there is just nothing that beats biscuits & gravy made with lard, cooked in cast-iron on an old wood-stove, on a cold winter Saturday morning! icon_biggrin.gif )

PixieDiva Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:42am
post #45 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorrieg

I make my sugar cookies with butter, butter/margarine or margarine depending on what they will be used for.




What is the difference and what are the different uses? I'm wondering if butter or margarine or whatever makes a more tender cookie, etc...

What is Poutine?

As far as using lard in cooking, yes, lard makes the best pie crust and biscuits. I did not grow up poor/am not poor now, but bacon grease is always what I fry my eggs in. Is there anything else to fry them in? LOL. Top chefs use bacon grease in their cooking as well (as seen on Top Chef). It's just an unbeatable flavor that you can't get from anything else.

As far as your lard having a bacony smell/flavor... perhaps it is the brand/kind that you are buying? It should be odorless and pretty much flavorless in your baking. It should be refrigerated, or it will go rancid. Sort of like butter, you can leave it out for a while, but then it gets that rancid flavor if it is out too long.

beemarie Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:51am
post #46 of 158
Quote:
Quote:

My grandmother made biscuits using lard and OMG, they were out of this world. Back in her time, no one worried about all the things we worry about today.




Maybe we ought to learn from people long ago when they didn't eat everything low-fat, processed, but ate things that were readily available without being processed, and ate lots of fats, too! People of years ago were healthier, leaner and had less cancer rates than today. There is strong research that shows that the bad fats are actually the vegetable oils that are liquid at room temp, and the good ones are solid at room temp (coconut oil, butter, lard). I am an advocate for anything in moderation, but if we can learn to eat the good fats, we should--after all our bodies need fat. Not to change this topic from what it was originally started for--as I would love to know if lard would taste good. I know it is better for you than crisco!

Quote:
Quote:

MOST EXCITING AND INFORMATIVE

âEat Fat, Lose Fatâ by Mary Enig, Ph.D., and Sally Fallon is the most exciting and informative book Iâve read since I read Theron Randolphâs Human Ecology and Susceptibility to the Chemical Environment 29 years ago. This is not primarily a book about losing weight. Their basic premise is that many chronic diseases can be healed by consuming coconut oil, cod liver oil, lard, and raw organic milk and butter, and they summarize the evidence that the vegetable oil industry has promoted oils which cause heart disease, hypothyroidism, chronic fatigue syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, reduced libido, allergies, hay fever, asthma, attention deficits, diabetes, hypoglycemia, food cravings, candidiasis, menorrhagia, immunodeficiciency, autoimmunity, irritable bowel, colitis, Crohnâs Disease, eczema, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes, and AIDS. They also show that the drug industry has promoted the falsehood that dietary cholesterol causes arteriosclerosis in order to sell cholesterol lowering drugs. Why read a spy novel when the shocking truth about how the food and drug industries are using medical research to trick physicians and the public is laid out in âEat Fat, Lose Fatâ? There are also recipes, and 20 pages on how to find and purchase healthful, less chemically-contaminated fats and other traditional healthful foods. With nutritional supplements in jeopardy, itâs time to learn how traditional fats and other whole foods can restore and maintain health.

Lawrence A. Plumlee, M.D.
Book Review for The Environmental Physician


beemarie Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 2:52am
post #47 of 158
Quote:
Quote:

My grandmother made biscuits using lard and OMG, they were out of this world. Back in her time, no one worried about all the things we worry about today.




Maybe we ought to learn from people long ago when they didn't eat everything low-fat, processed, but ate things that were readily available without being processed, and ate lots of fats, too! People of years ago were healthier, leaner and had less cancer rates than today. There is strong research that shows that the bad fats are actually the vegetable oils that are liquid at room temp, and the good ones are solid at room temp (coconut oil, butter, lard). I am an advocate for anything in moderation, but if we can learn to eat the good fats, we should--after all our bodies need fat. Not to change this topic from what it was originally started for--as I would love to know if lard would taste good. I know it is better for you than crisco!

Quote:
Quote:

MOST EXCITING AND INFORMATIVE

âEat Fat, Lose Fatâ by Mary Enig, Ph.D., and Sally Fallon is the most exciting and informative book Iâve read since I read Theron Randolphâs Human Ecology and Susceptibility to the Chemical Environment 29 years ago. This is not primarily a book about losing weight. Their basic premise is that many chronic diseases can be healed by consuming coconut oil, cod liver oil, lard, and raw organic milk and butter, and they summarize the evidence that the vegetable oil industry has promoted oils which cause heart disease, hypothyroidism, chronic fatigue syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, reduced libido, allergies, hay fever, asthma, attention deficits, diabetes, hypoglycemia, food cravings, candidiasis, menorrhagia, immunodeficiciency, autoimmunity, irritable bowel, colitis, Crohnâs Disease, eczema, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes, and AIDS. They also show that the drug industry has promoted the falsehood that dietary cholesterol causes arteriosclerosis in order to sell cholesterol lowering drugs. Why read a spy novel when the shocking truth about how the food and drug industries are using medical research to trick physicians and the public is laid out in âEat Fat, Lose Fatâ? There are also recipes, and 20 pages on how to find and purchase healthful, less chemically-contaminated fats and other traditional healthful foods. With nutritional supplements in jeopardy, itâs time to learn how traditional fats and other whole foods can restore and maintain health.

Lawrence A. Plumlee, M.D.
Book Review for The Environmental Physician


indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:00am
post #48 of 158

I use bacon/bacon grease in a lot of cooking (green beans just ain't green beans without bacon and onion!) ... the orig post was asking about "lard" and I see lard and bacon as two different things.

(You guys are so bad! After all this talk about food.....it's 11:00 p.m. and I'm heading to the kitchen to fry me an egg sandwich ... in bacon grease! What a horribly delicious midnight snack! icon_lol.gif )

sugarlove Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:02am
post #49 of 158

Lard is rendered pork fat i.e, fat back, leaf lard (fat around kidneys). Rendered beef fat (tallow) is made from beef suet.

sugarlove Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:13am
post #50 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by crisseyann

Oh boy, frying eggs in bacon grease....takes me WAY back! Mom use to make them, we called them "Lacy Eggs" because they were so crisp and lacy around the edges. YUM!




Yep! so good. I know what I'm eating for breakfast.

jibbies Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:17am
post #51 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarlove

Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

As much as I love red meat, steaks, hamburgers, steak, I can't imagine animal fat in my icing icon_surprised.gif
If you are brave enough to try it let us know how it turns out icon_wink.gif
Did I mention I love steak?

jibbies



hmm, well I guess butter (IMBC, Swiss buttercream, or any TRUE buttercream) is a no go since its made from animal (beef) fat. Taste mighty darn good to me.




In my kitchen I only use real butter, whole milk and heavy whipping cream so I reckon I know where they come from. I make real buttercream too! But some parts of the cow is fer some thangs and some parts they be fer others. Jes lik some parts o the chicken is for some things I use eggs in my cake batter but I wouldn't stick a drumstick in thear. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_wink.gif
Pass that fried egg sanich debi, lets fry up some bologna to go with it

jibbies, (wiping the grease off with the back of my sleeve) thumbs_up.gif

cwcopeland Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:23am
post #52 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarlove

Quote:
Originally Posted by crisseyann

Oh boy, frying eggs in bacon grease....takes me WAY back! Mom use to make them, we called them "Lacy Eggs" because they were so crisp and lacy around the edges. YUM!



Yep! so good. I know what I'm eating for breakfast.




Holy Cow! This is making me hungry. My mom is from Japan. She married my dad (who was a Texas Redneck) when he was stationed in Japan. She used to fry eggs (over easy), chop them up with crumbled bacon, pour a little soy sauce on them and pour the whole thing over steamed rice. Weird combination, I know, but sooooo good. She also did the biscuits, gravy, etc too, but couldn't help but change it up every now and then.

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:25am
post #53 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies


......but I wouldn't stick a drumstick in thear.




ROF on that one!

(oh, heck! Back in a second! Forgot to slap some mayo on this sandwich! Cheese! Where did I put the dang cheese?)

jibbies Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:34am
post #54 of 158

indydebi wrote
oh, heck! Back in a second! Forgot to slap some mayo on this sandwich! Cheese! Where did I put the dang cheese?)

Lets go whole hog (kin eny uv that be stuck in icing, hmmm, nope) fry some taters up to go with that there egg bologna cheese sanich, them ther 5 star fancy eatin' places ain't got nothun on us.

jib(burp)bies

KrisD13 Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:36am
post #55 of 158

For anyone worried about cholesterol.....

Mine was really, really, really high. Did some research online. Started taking 3 Grapefruit fibre pills (can't remember mg potency) per day.....2 months later it had dropped by a full 40%. With prescribed meds, you are lucky if you get this result in 2 yrs.

Verified by blood cholesterol testing done by my doctor.

I choose this way because I couldn't stomach the drugs he prescribed, I was getting sick and nauseous, so I stopped them after one week.

The benefit of the grapefruit fibre pills...not only does it remove it from the bloodstream, it slowly cleans the arteries, too.... and there are no side effects. icon_biggrin.gif

HTH

ceshell Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:39am
post #56 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

But some parts of the cow is fer some thangs and some parts they be fer others. Jes lik some parts o the chicken is for some things I use eggs in my cake batter but I wouldn't stick a drumstick in thear. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_wink.gif




Stop it, yer killin' me!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gifthumbs_up.gif

DelightsByE Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:39am
post #57 of 158

& don't forget to smear some bacon grease on the bread so when you fry it in the cast iron skillet, it gets all crispy-like thumbs_up.gif

jibbies Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:46am
post #58 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by DelightsByE

& don't forget to smear some bacon grease on the bread so when you fry it in the cast iron skillet, it gets all crispy-like thumbs_up.gif




I thought you wuz in Mary Land!! howd you no I use them ther casted irn skilets, you ben lookin over my shouder icon_wink.gif

jibbies

DelightsByE Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:48am
post #59 of 158

We aint Yanks down here....we's SOUTH of the Mason-Dixon Line dontcha know.....

shivs Posted 25 Oct 2007 , 3:54am
post #60 of 158

Now Im hungry........... thumbs_up.gif

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