Sheet Vs Round Pricing

Decorating By delisa01 Updated 23 Oct 2007 , 10:12pm by ashleymoore

delisa01 Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 5:14pm
post #1 of 14

Do you charge the same per serving?

TIA

Delia

13 replies
indydebi Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 5:19pm
post #2 of 14

Sheet cake: Defined as a single layer, not torted or filled. $1.50/serving. Delivery and set up not included. Based on a 2x2x2 serving size.

Non-Sheet cake: ANything that doesn't fit into the above description. $3/serving. Based on a 1x2x4 serving size. Delivery included for larger (wedding) cakes.

Exception: I don't do sheet cakes for weddings simply because I charge the same for the sheet as I do for the wedding. If I'm delivering it, then they are paying the price that includes delivery. Plus it's more work for me to do a wedding cake + sheet cake as opposed to doing a wedding cake. I can bake and decorate a 16/12/8 cake for 150 in less time that I can bake a 14/10/6 PLUS a sheet cake for 150. More work for me = NOT cheaper for you.

leily Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 5:59pm
post #3 of 14

I vote with indydebi... the only difference is I have to deliver b/c of the town I live in no matter what the cake, so I have delivery figured into my pricing within a small radius.

KoryAK Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 6:14pm
post #4 of 14

I guess that will depend on your definition of sheet cake. I do not make any cakes that a just a slab of iced cake, everything is torted. Even if they want a 2"er with no filling, it will be cut into 2 layers with a crumb coat type layer of icing in between. Since I only bake from scratch, the layers need to be thinner and have simple syrup. SO yes, I charge the same price for a sheet that serves 25 and a round that serves 25. Anything tiered is priced as a wedding cake with a more expensive pricing structure.

Chef_Stef Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 6:15pm
post #5 of 14

My sheet cakes are 2- 2" layers stacked, filled, and decorated to match the wedding cakes, so they are 4-1/2" deep, two layers of cake, one layer of filling. I charge for wedding-size servings, so 1 x 2 x 4+".

I charge $0.25 less per serving for sheet cakes than I do for my wedding servings, but that is only because there are less layers of cake in my sheets than wedding cakes (my wedding cakes are 4 layers of cake, 3 layers of filling in each tier). They take the same time to decorate and are a PIA to stack (try sliding a 12 x 18", 2" deep cake off a cake board!).

Actually, I'm seriously considering not offering them at all, because, like Deb, I find they're no less work and certainly no cheaper to decorate. I'd rather just do a larger whole wedding cake or, at most, a separate groom's cake. Sheets are more of a nuisance, to me.

indydebi Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 6:24pm
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by homecook


Actually, I'm seriously considering not offering them at all, because, like Deb, I find they're no less work and certainly no cheaper to decorate. I'd rather just do a larger whole wedding cake or, at most, a separate groom's cake. Sheets are more of a nuisance, to me.




They are a pain. And anytime I've done the catering but they've gotten the cake elsewhere, and there are sheet cakes in the kitchen, I swear to all of you that I've NEVER seen them cut those sheet cakes. They are a waste of time and money sitting in the kitchen.

I can't really say I don't "offer" them. I just never have to do them, once I point out that "it's the same amount of cake, no matter what pan I bake it in so it's the same price" ergo they are NOT going to save money.

I sell my wedding cakes two ways: one is cake only and one is the full package. Had one bride who wanted to order the whole package for 100 and then "just cake" for 50. I said, "THat's fine. Now, just explain to me how I am going to know which of your guests get their cake on a plate with punch in a cup and which of your guests get cake on their hand and have to drink from a water fountain?" She got the point.

jmt1714 Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 6:33pm
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

I guess that will depend on your definition of sheet cake. I do not make any cakes that a just a slab of iced cake, everything is torted. Even if they want a 2"er with no filling, it will be cut into 2 layers with a crumb coat type layer of icing in between. Since I only bake from scratch, the layers need to be thinner and have simple syrup. SO yes, I charge the same price for a sheet that serves 25 and a round that serves 25. Anything tiered is priced as a wedding cake with a more expensive pricing structure.




I bake from scratch too, so am trying to figure out why that means that the layers have to be thinner and require simple syrup.

Chef_Stef Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 6:36pm
post #8 of 14

Oh that's funny indydebi!

Reminds me of what to ask when I see icky, garish, sloppy sheet cakes being brought in past the wedding cake that I just set up, with their smooshed sides from where someone carried the costco box in along with an armload of whatever else:

"So, which 100 guests get to be in line for the custom-designed, gourmet flavored, beautifully decorated wedding cake, and which 100 guests get to be in line for a piece of THAT?"

KoryAK Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 6:39pm
post #9 of 14

Without all the chemicals found in boxed mixes, scratch cakes tend to be drier, and especially so after a day or two. Using simple syrup on layers no deeper than 1" (because the syrup won't soak more than 1/2" in or so) adds moisture (and different flavors if you choose).

delisa01 Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 1:59am
post #10 of 14

Thank you! I was questioning it because I had read a couple of posts where sheet cakes were cheaper. Mine, although not for a wedding, but a B-Day will be 2-2" cakes tall.

Delia

thjoghild Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 2:29am
post #11 of 14

What type of syrup do you use? I have heard of using syrup to sort of "seal" the cake and keep it from drying out, any special type?

KoryAK Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 7:09pm
post #12 of 14

Equal parts by volume water and sugar brought to a boil then add whatever flavorings you desire (or not)

shoup_family Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 8:39pm
post #13 of 14

how do you know the right amount of syrup to put on the cake?

ashleymoore Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 10:12pm
post #14 of 14

i am curious about the syrup on the sheet cakes as well. i am making a sheet cake from scratch friday for my daughters birthday. my last sheet cake was a little dry and i am trying to avoid that this time. my last was 2" and i was thinking of doing 2 layers this time but if i were to only make it 1" deep would i just use 1/2 my batter and bake it then use the other 1/2? would the syrup work ok if i kept it at 2"? do you have any other ideas on how to make a from scratch cake more moist? does applesauce help or is that not true?

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