Stacking Cakes

Decorating By Kookie Updated 30 Oct 2007 , 8:45pm by missmeg

Kookie Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 6:35pm
post #1 of 11

I am done my first wedding cake yesterday and have a question.
what is the best way to stack the cakes without any finger prints or
touching the decorated the cake on top of the another?
I tried not to touch or scrape the decorated cake when I stacked (drop?)the cake but it is not easy.
Thank you.

10 replies
indydebi Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 6:41pm
post #2 of 11

I take my spatula with me when I assemble the cake on-site. You can gently slide the spatula out when it's set in place. It's also a good tool to use if you have to make a adjustments to get the tier on-center.

I always add an icing border or ribbon border to any smudges are covered.

Kookie Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 2:19am
post #3 of 11

Hello indydebi,
I see.. I will use a spatula next time.
Thank you .

leah_s Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 2:21am
post #4 of 11

Of course if you use SPS (Single Plate Separator) for stacking cakes you can actually slide it into place.

tasteebakes Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 2:48am
post #5 of 11

leahs is making a believer out of me!I'm going to have to start using SPS, everywhere I go you are advocating it.
I have been contemplating ordering some from Bakery crafts, Isn't it less expensive to use wooden dowels.
I mean, I know SPS is inexpensive and all.
also leahs, do you order the whole SPS with delivery system from Bakery crafts? or just the actual SPS?
I'm trying to find a bridal show in my area to get a cake to and I think I would feel better using SPS than the wooden dowels I've been using.

leah_s Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 11:15am
post #6 of 11

I do not order the entire system including the box because I was taught to deliver unboxed, which I've done for years. I use the plates and columns.

Yes, dowels are probably cheaper, but I think they're harder to use and certainly much more unstable. The last cake I delivered doweled (two tiers only) shifted either during delivery or as DH carried it in. the problem with dowels is this: If you don't get the tier sitting on top dropped in exactly the right spot the first time, then you have to adjust it toward the center. If you take you spatula and poke the cardboard underneath it to move it toward the center a bit, then you have likely also pushed your dowels so that they are not standing vertical any more. Think about it. Then because the dowels are no longer perfectly vertical, your whole cake is at risk of collapse.

That just can not happen with SPS. Not even possible. Because the plate and column assembly goes into the cake as one unit, it will be straight forever, even as you cut away the cake to serve it.

And I pass the expense on to my customers with a $20 equipment fee. That make the whole thing disposable. I don't make any$ off it, but then I don't ever worry about transporting a stacked cake, either.

I stumbled on this system a few years ago, and can't believe that everyone isn't using it. As I always say its easy, cheap and sturdy. What more could you ask for?

I also love my Agbay, but its not so cheap and I understand that some folks can't justify the purchase. Even I waited a year or so before I coughed up the $ for that. Now I don't know why I waiting so long.

But SPS? Really, it's cheap. Your customers, especially wedding customers will pay for it. I just tell them "I require you to purchase the support system, because without it your cake will fall down." No arguments.

tasteebakes Posted 23 Oct 2007 , 2:20pm
post #7 of 11

Thanks for your response! I will happily order SPS now. I used it before at my cake decorating "JOB" but had never bought it for my own shop.
Thanks again!

vdrsolo Posted 28 Oct 2007 , 9:20pm
post #8 of 11
Originally Posted by leahs

Of course if you use SPS (Single Plate Separator) for stacking cakes you can actually slide it into place. know I use SPS as well, but how are you able to slide into place with the nub in the middle so I can match it up with the hole in the cardboard?? Once I get my hands out from underneath the cake and have it by the icing spatula, I slide it into place but I'm looking up underneath the cake for my hole in the cardboard to let it down, do you just slide the cake around until the nub hits the hole??

You will think this is funny, Leah..I was setting up yesterday and a "cake decorator" came to watch me (actually hoard over me, I just about b-slapped her if you know what I mean). She saw the plastic SPS Plate and started going on about how if her cakes are off center that she just moves the cakes by moving the whole dowels around. I'm looking at her like...What???. I told her that I used SPS, it had no dowels, and will always be centered. Of course, she was like, yea, that's what I use, and proceeded to tell me more about moving her center dowel around! And of course she said fondant taste bad, but yet, had NEVER heard of Satin Ice. Anyone who has ever stepped foot into a cake decorating store has heard of Satin Ice!!

Another thing that is nice with this system is that if you get the cake into place, and even though it is centered in the cake, the design is offcenter, just take your icing spatula to lift the cake and spin it to the correct position!

dogluvr Posted 28 Oct 2007 , 11:44pm
post #9 of 11

You can also leave your dowels sticking out about 1 inch so this will allow 1 inch for finger room. When you place your cake on the dowels, it will push them the rest of the way in.

debster Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 1:52am
post #10 of 11

Help my ignorance please, is there a link to this system? I for the life of me don't know what your talking about. Thanks

missmeg Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 8:45pm
post #11 of 11

I found this and it really explained alot to me!

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