How Do I Get This Effect?

Decorating By suzylynn58 Updated 18 Oct 2007 , 8:08pm by superstar

suzylynn58 Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:23am
post #1 of 37

This a picture of cake one of my brides wants. Is that just piping around the cake to get the rings? Any tips on getting them really straight?

Thanks,
Susan
LL

36 replies
CINDY1956 Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:26am
post #2 of 37

I don't know...but what a cool cake!!!

indydebi Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:35am
post #3 of 37

I'm betting there is a special tool that makes that effect. I'm logging into this thread so I can find out, too.

samcfi Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:35am
post #4 of 37

Could they have used one of those combs?

mcalhoun Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:28am
post #5 of 37

Do you think it is one of those comb's that you run around the sides of the cake? I am not sure that is what they are called but they have an edge on them and you run around the icing before it crusts.

Erdica Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:37am
post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by samcfi

Could they have used one of those combs?




That's exactly what I was thinking too. I know Wilton makes some kind of a cake comb that makes this kind of effect. I personally have never used it.

aztomcat Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:38am
post #7 of 37

I just bought the wilton interchangle combs. And I think that is what was used or another version of it.

GenGen Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:42am
post #9 of 37

agreed i belive its one of those handy dandy combs icon_smile.gif

woodthi32 Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:45am
post #10 of 37

In the minority here. I think it's piped. It's definitely not that comb in the link....I have the interchangable. I'll have to go look at it...........

superstar Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:47am
post #11 of 37

I am sure it is that comb, but I am watching with interest to see if anyone has any other ideas.

CINDY1956 Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:49am
post #12 of 37

I too think it was made with a comb of some type...
Maybe made their own from a plastic spread tool that you can buy in the paint dept, some use it to spread plaster... (can't think what their called)..it's how i smooth my frosting.

spidy-man Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:54am
post #13 of 37

That design is not made using the Wilton comb. The Wilton comb and others like it make designs in the icing itself. If you look closely the lines are a different color icing than what's underneath which means they were piped (or something) seperately. Also some of the lines do look a bit uneven. Try using a revolving cake stand and holding the bag still while you spin the stand.

DelightsByE Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:54am
post #14 of 37

I'm betting it's this one - and they probably have several sets in order to get the proper separations

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E31A21B-475A-BAC0-51A3CBEF4593810B&fid=3E32F518-475A-BAC0-535818F5D52DA731

BCJean Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:49am
post #15 of 37

I don't think it is a comb...at least not that one. The rings are further apart than what the ridges on the comb are. Also the comb doesn't leave it flat on the background like that cake is.
I think they marked it with a comb (which they probably made themselves) and spaced out for the rings then piped the rings on, using the comb markings as a guide. If you had an electric turntable it would be quite easy to put the rings on smooth. I know I used to make my own combs for making striped chocolate bows.

cakeconfections Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:58am
post #16 of 37

I have seen a few decorators do this, and it was not done by a comb. It is hand piped on and not an easy task. If you are going to do this, charge well.

Jenn123 Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:59am
post #17 of 37

I think that they marked it with a comb and then piped over the marks. Good luck! This will be hard to keep straight.

Deani Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 1:56am
post #18 of 37

I don't have any photos to show, but I have a bread knife with a scalloped edge that gives a lovely effect on the side of a cake.

RICKASH Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:14am
post #19 of 37

have you thought about using a clay gun with some gumpaste and doing it that way it might be alot easier. you could still mark where you wanted it to go. If it were me I would dust the cake with luster and then add thin stips to it, but thats me.

CelebrationCakery Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:19am
post #20 of 37

I think I know exactly what that is...when I was doing some masonry work here in my house I had to use a tool that had edges that made that effect so that the tile would stick. I think you can by it at a home center. If my camera was working I would get a picture of it for you....it made designs just like that though....so I would check in the tiling dept, where the trowels are....

kakeladi Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:15am
post #21 of 37

BCJean said:....I think they marked it with a comb (which they probably made themselves) and spaced out for the rings then piped the rings on, using the comb markings as a guide....

Bingoicon_smile.gif
If you look closely at the actual icing/covering of the tiers it appears to exceed the heigth of the cake slightly; it probably is white choco clay (similar to fondant), then the lines are piped on w/a bag by hand.

DelightsByE Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:17am
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristianDonovan

I think I know exactly what that is...when I was doing some masonry work here in my house I had to use a tool that had edges that made that effect so that the tile would stick. I think you can by it at a home center. If my camera was working I would get a picture of it for you....it made designs just like that though....so I would check in the tiling dept, where the trowels are....




you mean one of these?
LL

all4cake Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:25am
post #23 of 37

I think it is piped.

I have southern engineered a tool to give me multiple, evenly spaced lines. I took a piece of cardboard, cut it the height of the tier. Then, using a ruler, put evenly spaced marks on the cardboard. Using the marks as a guide, I taped toothpicks to the cardboard. Reinforce the toothpicks at the cardboard with a bit more tape. Then, you can lightly run it around the iced tier to leave the guide marks.

You can also tape the toothpicks to an icing smoother.

This is just an idea just in case that ideal tool doesn't surface before your cake is due.

DelightsByE Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:28am
post #24 of 37

hey.....how did my post get posted BEFORE the post that I quoted???

icon_confused.gif

all4cake Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:30am
post #25 of 37

Holding your hand completely still while squeezing with an even pressure while your cool NEW electric turntable rotates....That would do it, for sure!

Deana Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:32am
post #26 of 37

Just today, I saw that exact same picture in a local wedding guide (article was a book review "Southern Weddings")

researched the internet and found this : Tara Guerard was the wedding planner and this is the profile

http://slideshow.ivillage.com/weddings/real_weddings_dinner_at_tiffanys/post_193.html

this shows a bigger picture and it may be a little clearer...

CelebrationCakery Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:32am
post #27 of 37

I found it...it is a notched trowel...I have a square notched trowel personally. I found one on the lowes site....

CelebrationCakery Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:33am
post #28 of 37

I found it...it is a notched trowel...I have a square notched trowel personally. I found one on the lowes site....

woodthi32 Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:36am
post #29 of 37

But the notches on a trowel are even. You would have to doctor it in some way. I don't know if you could do that and stay smooth........

PennySue Posted 18 Oct 2007 , 2:33am
post #30 of 37

I have the comb also but that looks like it was piped on to me.

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