After 1.5 Hours, Cake Still Not Baked In Middle...

Decorating By jobartwo Updated 17 Apr 2016 , 3:54pm by aztomcat

jobartwo Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 4:53pm
post #1 of 23

The oven temp said 350. The recipe called for cake to be baked in bundt pan, but I put it in an 8" round 3" pan. Didn't use heating core. Cut the top off and the inside is still mushy. Can I put it back in oven to save it. Expensive ingredients!!! Thanks!

22 replies
step0nmi Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:03pm
post #2 of 23

Sounds like your oven is not running properly. Do you have a thermometer to test if it's really 350?

I think it you put it back in the oven it might dry out the stuff that did cook. What you could've done was invert a flower nail in the bottom of the pan after greasing and flowering it. other than that I don't have anything...sorry your cake didn't cook!

aztomcat Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:11pm
post #3 of 23

Yikes, I'd put it back in but place a cookie sheet underneath and cover the top edges with foil. So that the heat goes to the middle.

Flower nail or heating core all the time.

I always bake at lower temps and expect the timing to be longer.

elvis Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:08pm
post #4 of 23

That's weird-- its worth sticking it back in the oven though. Its gotta cook at some point. Maybe you could put some foil over it to keep the cooked parts from getting overdone.

diamondjacks Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:11pm
post #5 of 23

I would be investing in an oven thermonmeter!! ASAP You never know! My friends cakes were baking in 10 mins it was over 75 degrees off!

moonlightschild Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:12pm
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by aztomcat

Yikes, I'd put it back in but place a cookie sheet underneath and cover the top edges with foil. So that the heat goes to the middle.

Flower nail or heating core all the time.

I always bake at lower temps and expect the timing to be longer.





nothing to do with the topic but i think your avatar is hilarious!!!

Coraellen Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:15pm
post #7 of 23

[I think it you put it back in the oven it might dry out the stuff that did cook]

I'm sorry to say I agree and it might even burn before you get the center baked that is if your cake has already cooled. If it is just out of the oven put it back in with foil around the edges like the other ladies said. But if it is cooled you are probably going to have to start over.., however now you have enough cake to make a ton of cake balls. (looking for a bright side for you)

I'm so sorry. Good Luck!

auntginn Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:15pm
post #8 of 23

Oh so sorry to hear this, however whether it cooks of not really will depend on how long it has been out of the oven. Because when food is baking, it (at whatever rate; depending on the temp) has to reach that point and its the process of the heat that does this. therefore I would not expect it to finish baking.

Hope that made sense

tcturtleshell Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:24pm
post #9 of 23

I had this happen & it was because my oven was off big time. Get a thermometer. My oven was off by 35*. Got it adjusted & it works fine now. BTW, the cakes never baked, I put them back in for a long time & it never baked. I used the baked part for cakeballs icon_smile.gif

fondantgrl Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:29pm
post #10 of 23

I would losely cover it w/ foil. I think there might bee too much batter since it is a 3 inch tall pan... good luck

Luxe42 Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:41pm
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonlightschild

Quote:
Originally Posted by aztomcat

Yikes, I'd put it back in but place a cookie sheet underneath and cover the top edges with foil. So that the heat goes to the middle.

Flower nail or heating core all the time.

I always bake at lower temps and expect the timing to be longer.




nothing to do with the topic but i think your avatar is hilarious!!!




DITTO!

jobartwo Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:41pm
post #12 of 23

Thank you all for your great suggestions. No doubt, I need a new oven.

sgilmer Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:40pm
post #13 of 23

It probably has something to do wiht the 3 inch sides. I have a 6 x 3 round pan and I can never get it to cook right in the middle. I had my oven temps low and it was cooking around the sides and on top, but not in the middle. I had a flower nail in there too and if I let it cook any longer it would have burnt. I guess I should have used my bake even strips

halfbaked101 Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 5:43pm
post #14 of 23

i would turn heat down to 325 or less i cook my 16 inch cakes at around 300 when i use a really buttery cake or for most homemade cakes.

Jocmom Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 6:03pm
post #15 of 23

I agree with all of the above suggestions. I use a rose nail for my deeper pans.

I would get your oven checked out. I was baking a batch of cookies once and couldn't figure out why they were still raw after 15 minutes. I soon discovered that the bottom heating element in my oven had shorted out. (hey . . . I ran that oven right into the ground with all my baking)

Good luck.

step0nmi Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 6:48pm
post #16 of 23

I have had my oven's break on me too! It's such a pain!

Ya know what! I bought that 8X3 pan too and it didn't cook my cake well either! I think I am sticking with the 2" pans...I know how much to put in there, if i need to I can coller the pan, and it never fails!


Sorry you need to get your oven fixed! Did you temp. it??

CShields Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 7:44pm
post #17 of 23

I had the same problem as you with cakes not getting done in the middle. After investing in a good oven thermometer, a number of years ago, I found that my oven's readings were low. I manually upped the temp on the knob and that corrected the temperature problem. However, the cakes were still not getting done in a timely manner nor could I depend on a predetermined time of doneness (like the recipe books predicted). I invested in a couple of the cake heating cores, which were probably about $4.50 each. I found that using the cake heating cores not only solved the problem of the center of the cake doneness, but I also noticed that from then on my cakes were uniformly done, baked in less time, and were much more moist and tender because they baked quickly and evenly. To make a long story short, it was a whole lot cheaper to invest in an oven thermometer and a couple of cake heating cores than buy a new oven. After all, the women in the old days baked some pretty great cakes, which many of their recipes are being handed down to us today, and it is for sure that they were in the days before people could afford buying a new oven or having it delivered to them. Just a suggestion. thumbs_up.gif

GatuPR Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 7:55pm
post #18 of 23

LOYILAW posted in the Spanish CC forum that her husband opened the oven door too soon and her cake sank in the middle. She put the cake in a food processor and then mixed it in a new batch of batter and baked it. She posted pictures of the new cake and it looked really nice. I have not tried it, but it worked for her.

komai Posted 16 Apr 2016 , 8:07pm
post #19 of 23

you're lucky, mine didn't cook for 3 hours already but it rise like a bathbomb. somebody help me!! i think i did something wrong with the recipe.


p/s: it's a brownies. grin.png

remnant3333 Posted 16 Apr 2016 , 11:35pm
post #20 of 23

 Two inch pans work best for me.  I have heard a lot of people who have issues with the 3 inch pan and it is always the same story that the middle of cake does not cook properly. It sounds like the heat cores may solve your problem. Give it a try and let us know the outcome. Good luck!!

kakeladi Posted 17 Apr 2016 , 2:28am
post #21 of 23

This is a very old thread but the advice is still prudent :)  You oven must be off.  Also, 2" deep pans give the best  cake baking results.

aztomcat Posted 17 Apr 2016 , 3:54pm
post #22 of 23

Besides your oven temp. Make a habit of using baking cores or Rose nails to distribute  heat.    I also wrap the outsides in baking strips. 


 Good luck with getting a new oven

aztomcat Posted 17 Apr 2016 , 3:54pm
post #23 of 23

Besides your oven temp. Make a habit of using baking cores or Rose nails to distribute  heat.    I also wrap the outsides in baking strips. 


 Good luck with getting a new oven

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