Need Reliable Imbc Recipe.

Baking By BakingGirl Updated 19 Oct 2007 , 11:28am by JanetPlanet

BakingGirl Posted 14 Oct 2007 , 1:14pm
post #1 of 7

I am an avid fan of IMBC, I love the taste and the silky texture. My only complaint is that I am having a hard time getting the BC to come out the same way each time. Sometimes it is very stiff and great for piping and sometimes it is very soft. It is not just a room temperature issue either, it is definitively the BC itself that is temperamental. I want to be able to make a batch and know I will be able to pipe with it if I want.

I currently use the Mousseline BC recipe from the Cake Bible. I have also tried the Whimsical Bakehouse IMBC recipe which I found even more unreliable. If you use IMBC and achive consistent results, please let me in on the secret or the recipe you use.

6 replies
ShirleyW Posted 14 Oct 2007 , 2:27pm
post #2 of 7

I think the texture depends on the amount of time you beat it and also the temperature of the butter when added. Try having a slight chill on the butter, not rock hard, but not room temp. either, just so there is a bit of give if you squeeze the stick. Here is the recipe I use which is adapted from the original Martha Stewart recipe, I don't seem to have a problem with consistency with it but I have cut the amount of butter to 12 oz. and like it much better.

http://cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2426-Italian-Meringue-Buttercream--Shirleys-Method.html

JanetPlanet Posted 14 Oct 2007 , 2:46pm
post #3 of 7

Wow this was timely! I was just about to try Shirley's method this morning! I've never made IMBC before, but this sure sounds like a proven recipe. Shirley ~ if you are still out there, I was also wondering ~

How far in advance (minutes/hours) can I made the IMBC? Can it wait as the cake bakes and cools?

Should I start with the eggs at room temp?

Can I substitute lemon extract for the orange?

Thank you!!!

BakingGirl Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 12:47am
post #4 of 7

Thank you Shirley for your insight and your recipe. Sorry it has taken me so long to reply but I was caught out by the CC outage.

Can I please ask you to clarify a couple of things if you don't mind.

I, like you, make IMBC with butter which is slightly colder than room temp. I usually take my butter out when I start making the sugar syrup, and slice it into tablespoon chunks. By the time my meringue has cooled the butter is starting to soften but it is not mushy. So I think my butter is OK.

So when you say you have adapted the Martha Stewart recipe and cut the amount butter, how did it affect the outcome and why do you like it better that way compared to the original recipe.

Also you mention the time beating can affect outcome, do you mean beating the meringue or after the butter has been added. I usually beat until all the butter has been added and the BC stops looking curdled and have become silky. The meringue sometimes is beaten for quite some time as it always takes much longer to cool than what is stated in recipes. I live in a hot climate but run the A/C.

What I am trying to get to the bottom of is which factor makes for a stiff IMBC. Is it more egg, more sugar or more butter, do you know? I once accidently added more sugar than what the recipe stated and I loved the outcome, but the next time I made it that way it was too soft again - so I am not sure if the extra sugar really made a difference.

I will definitively try your recipe next time I make a cake.

sugarlove Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 1:10am
post #5 of 7

If you want a stiffer IMBC for piping things such as roses...all you have to do if chill the buttercream a bit until it get to the consistency you want. If you allow it to get too cold you'll have to re whip it but try not to whip the final buttercream (after the curdle stage) too long as the whipping will warm it and it will become softer but still stable.

ShirleyW Posted 17 Oct 2007 , 1:48am
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingGirl

Thank you Shirley for your insight and your recipe. Sorry it has taken me so long to reply but I was caught out by the CC outage.

Can I please ask you to clarify a couple of things if you don't mind.

I, like you, make IMBC with butter which is slightly colder than room temp. I usually take my butter out when I start making the sugar syrup, and slice it into tablespoon chunks. By the time my meringue has cooled the butter is starting to soften but it is not mushy. So I think my butter is OK.

So when you say you have adapted the Martha Stewart recipe and cut the amount butter, how did it affect the outcome and why do you like it better that way compared to the original recipe.

Also you mention the time beating can affect outcome, do you mean beating the meringue or after the butter has been added. I usually beat until all the butter has been added and the BC stops looking curdled and have become silky. The meringue sometimes is beaten for quite some time as it always takes much longer to cool than what is stated in recipes. I live in a hot climate but run the A/C.

What I am trying to get to the bottom of is which factor makes for a stiff IMBC. Is it more egg, more sugar or more butter, do you know? I once accidently added more sugar than what the recipe stated and I loved the outcome, but the next time I made it that way it was too soft again - so I am not sure if the extra sugar really made a difference.

I will definitively try your recipe next time I make a cake.




Let's see if I understand each question. On the butter, I cut mine into slices or pieces before I start the syrup. I leave it in the fridge until the sugar syrup begins to cook and the egg whites are almost at stiff peaks.
So, the butter is still quite cold when added, but not rock hard, and not soft room temperature.

By how long you beat. I beat the syrup into the stiff egg white with the whisk attachment and on a fairly low speed so it doesn't splash, once I have emptied all the syrup into the whites I turn the speed to high and beat until the outside of the mixer bowl feels cool to the palms of my hands.

I switch to the paddle attachment and turn the mixer on a medium low speed, add the butter a few pieces at a time until it is all incorporated, then I wrap the top of my bowl and the mixer housing with plastic wrap to catch the spatters, or you can just cover the top of the mixer and down the sides of the bowl with a cloth dish towel. I like using the plastic wrap because I can see what the icing is doing without having to lift the towel away. I turn the speed to high and beat until the outside of the bowl feels cool to my hands, the icing comes together and begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. I then add the flavoring and beat till the icing is shiny and fluffy. You can actually hear a change in the sound of the paddle attachment when the icing is ready, it makes kind of a slapping noise.

Yes on the lemon extract, just a few drops along with the vanilla. You can use any flavoring you like really. I prefer that little bit of orange extract along with the vanilla, it cuts the sweetness a bit and I love the flavor, not really citrus orange but just a pleasant, fresh taste.

When I say my recipe is adapted from Martha's, all I did was cut the butter down from 4 sticks to 3, and added the half capful of orange extract along with the vanilla. The 4 sticks of butter made it too buttery tasting to me. Reducing it to 3 sticks still makes a very nice texture to the icing and it smooths beautifully on the cake. I ice my cakes with freshly made buttercream. If I have leftover I freeze it, thaw in the fridge the night before, bring it to room temperature and use that icing to make my dam and crumb coat.

What makes the IMBC thicker or thinner? My own opinion is the amount of time it is beaten after adding the butter, but along with that you have to make sure the syrup is cooked to the correct temperature, the egg whites are stiff but not dry, you don't pour the cooked syrup in too fast or too slowly either, just a steady pouring, and the butter temperature is just right, not too soft, not too hard. I think if you beat till it combines, it looks shiny and fluffy but also holds it shape, it is done. You can turn the mixer off, lift the beater up and run a knife blade through the icing, it should not run back together. If you overbeat it though I think it kind of dries it out and tends to have air bubbles. For me it is also the change in the sound of the paddle beater, I know when I hear that slapping noise it means pay attention and turn the mixer off.

JanetPlanet Posted 19 Oct 2007 , 11:28am
post #7 of 7

Shirley ~ thank you again for sharing your cake know-how! My IMBC turned out FABULOUS!!! The best word to describe it is SILK ~ how smooth it is to work with, how it feels and tastes...

Mine turned out bright snowy white, but I used European butter that was just barely cream-colored. My taste-testers LOVED it, but a couple thought the butter flavor was a little too strong, so maybe next time I'll try Land O' Lakes.

That's great to know I can freeze the leftovers, too!

THANK YOU!!!

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