Wedding Cake Support System

Decorating By NOONATRACEY Updated 31 Oct 2014 , 1:57pm by leah_s

NOONATRACEY Posted 7 Oct 2007 , 11:32pm
post #1 of 19

I am thinking about using a different support system for stacked wedding cakes. I am currently using a system where you sit each tier on a plastic plate and that locks into four plastic tubes. The four tubes (about 1" diameter) are inserted in the tier beneath it. The problem is, sometimes, I have a gap between the two tiers ad the plastic plates can add up, money wise. So I was thinking about just sitting the cake, which is on carboard, directly on the tubes. Does anyone use this technique and if so, what are your suggestions, pros-cons, advice. TIA

18 replies
deetmar Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 12:25am
post #2 of 19

I use whatever the bride asks for. If they want the plastic plates, charge for them or have them leave a deposit that is refunded when returned. I personally use the cardboard or foamcore stacked. It all depends on the design for me.

CherryBomb Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 12:39am
post #3 of 19

I just use cardboard and wooden dowels.

sweetcakes Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 1:39pm
post #4 of 19

the bakery i work at does this, plastic dowels trimmed to fit cake with the layer just on cardboard circles. its worked for them for the past 50 yrs.

indydebi Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 1:51pm
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by deetmar

I use whatever the bride asks for.




No bride I've ever dealt with knows anything about cake construction, so they never ask for anything specific in how the cake is engineered and constructed.

since I stay and cut/serve the wedding cake anyway, I use plates between my tiers. If I do a Drop-n-Run (delivery and set up only), then I use either just cardboards or the really cheap plastic plates that I don't get back (not worth the gas for either of us to return them.....it's just cheaper to buy new ones!).

odm_post Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 1:58pm
post #6 of 19

For those who used cardboards: won't they get soaked/all greasy from the icing?

TIA

indydebi Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 2:04pm
post #7 of 19

My icing crusts very well, so it's not a "wet" icing when I place the next tier on the cake. Because I wanted to see how it worked out, I used just cardboards on a cake I cut/serve. They were a little moist, but they didn't look like a doughnut that had been dipped in coffee or anything. Still nice and sturdy, supporting the cake fine.

If you're concerned, you can wrap the boards in wax or parchment paper.

mgdqueen Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 2:08pm
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by odm_post

For those who used cardboards: won't they get soaked/all greasy from the icing?

TIA




I cover with contact paper-a trick I learned from CC. I know some people use Glad press and seal as well.

odm_post Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 2:19pm
post #9 of 19

Parchment/wax paper makes sense.

What is contact paper? Sorry icon_redface.gif Will cling wrap do?

vdrsolo Posted 8 Oct 2007 , 2:23pm
post #10 of 19

Are you talking about SPS??

I use it exclusively. I do however make my cakes exactly 4" high. I also charge a small deposit equivalent to the price and shipping of the system. That way I can either get them back, or the bride has essentially paid an equipment fee.

I hate dowels, I hated cutting them, I love SPS because I know the cake is EXACTLY where I want it to be placed.

ctirella Posted 14 Aug 2014 , 9:36pm
post #11 of 19

AFor Those of you that use the SPS system I have a question, how do you attach the cake board on the plastic plate? Thank you

ellavanilla Posted 14 Aug 2014 , 9:49pm
post #12 of 19

I don't use anything but you can put a smear of BC on the plate. Don't forget to poke a little hole in the bottom of your cardboard with the cake plate BEFORE you put the cake on the cardboard. There is a little pin on the cake plate that helps to secure the two. 

 

jen

madewithloveYG Posted 30 Oct 2014 , 2:13pm
post #13 of 19

A

Original message sent by vdrsolo

Are you talking about SPS??

I use it exclusively. I do however make my cakes exactly 4" high. I also charge a small deposit equivalent to the price and shipping of the system. That way I can either get them back, or the bride has essentially paid an equipment fee.

I hate dowels, I hated cutting them, I love SPS because I know the cake is EXACTLY where I want it to be placed.

I have read about SPS and seen the video, however; have never used it. I have a dilemma and am hopeful that the SPS will be the solution. My daughter and I are in our first year of having a home based business. We had our first wedding consultation this week. The wedding will be very intimate and private, therefore, the cake will not be big. The couple decided on a 2 tiered round - 10" & 8" and 3 1/2 - 4" tall, buttercream frosting and gum paste roses cascading down the side.

You may be thinking: very simple task and I agree. :) However, the problem is the couple is getting married at the coast, which is approximately an hour away and the roads are bumpy & curvy! They want to take the cake with them completely assembled! :/ My biggest fear is the cake getting from point A to B in one piece and intact!

With your experience, will SPS keep the cake together completely on this drive?? Where do you purchase SPS? Do you have any tips to share?

Thank You in Advance for your help. It's very much appreciated.

Gina

morganchampagne Posted 30 Oct 2014 , 3:00pm
post #14 of 19

A

Original message sent by ctirella

For Those of you that use the SPS system I have a question, how do you attach the cake board on the plastic plate? Thank you

Double sided carpet tape! Not necessary but it helps with my peace of mind

leah_s Posted 30 Oct 2014 , 4:39pm
post #15 of 19

smear of buttercream

leah_s Posted 30 Oct 2014 , 4:39pm
post #16 of 19

you can also use a smear of royal or melted chocolate

ellavanilla Posted 30 Oct 2014 , 8:59pm
post #17 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by madewithloveYG 


I have read about SPS and seen the video, however; have never used it. I have a dilemma and am hopeful that the SPS will be the solution. My daughter and I are in our first year of having a home based business. We had our first wedding consultation this week. The wedding will be very intimate and private, therefore, the cake will not be big. The couple decided on a 2 tiered round - 10" & 8" and 3 1/2 - 4" tall, buttercream frosting and gum paste roses cascading down the side.

You may be thinking: very simple task and I agree. icon_smile.gif However, the problem is the couple is getting married at the coast, which is approximately an hour away and the roads are bumpy & curvy! They want to take the cake with them completely assembled! :/ My biggest fear is the cake getting from point A to B in one piece and intact!

With your experience, will SPS keep the cake together completely on this drive?? Where do you purchase SPS? Do you have any tips to share?

Thank You in Advance for your help. It's very much appreciated.

Gina

Almost any good assembly system will make the drive successfully, if it's done correctly, and the cake is kept at a cool temp. The SPS will work. I get mine from Oasis supply. 

 

Whatever support system you use, be sure that the support posts are LEVEL when stacking your tiers. I think this is the number one cause of delivery failure. Put the cake in a box that completely encloses the entire cake. Line the box with bubble wrap or styrofoam if you're worried about temperature. Put some non skid material between the box and the bottom of the cake if the box is a lot bigger than the base tier. 

 

put some non skid material on the floor of the trunk and be sure they know to put it on a flat surface. 

 

If they drive sanely, your cake should be just fine. 

 

jen

madewithloveYG Posted 31 Oct 2014 , 4:29am
post #18 of 19

A

Original message sent by ellavanilla

Almost any good assembly system will make the drive successfully, if it's done correctly, and the cake is kept at a cool temp. The SPS will work. I get mine from Oasis supply. 

Whatever support system you use, be sure that the support posts are LEVEL when stacking your tiers. I think this is the number one cause of delivery failure. Put the cake in a box that completely encloses the entire cake. Line the box with bubble wrap or styrofoam if you're worried about temperature. Put some non skid material between the box and the bottom of the cake if the box is a lot bigger than the base tier. 

put some non skid material on the floor of the trunk and be sure they know to put it on a flat surface. 

If they drive sanely, your cake should be just fine. 

jen

Thank You so much for the response Jen. I really appreciate it! :-)

leah_s Posted 31 Oct 2014 , 1:57pm
post #19 of 19

read my signature line.  :-)

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