Tips For Smoothing Non-Crusting Buttercream Frosting?

Decorating By Ambrosia Updated 14 Jun 2014 , 12:30pm by goof9j

Ambrosia Posted 1 Aug 2005 , 9:03pm
post #1 of 28

Hi all! I was wondering if anyone had any tips for this type of frosting. I tend to use it because it tastes so much better than the crusting crisco buttercreams (to me, anyways). I find it a bit harder to get a completely smooth finish. Is this something that comes with practice? This week's cake DOES look better than last weeks, as far as the icing goes. icon_smile.gif

or maybe someone could give me a crusting buttercream recipe that doesn't taste like powdered sugar flavored crisco (preferably one that could also be made stiff enough for flowers)? icon_eek.gif

27 replies
dodibug Posted 2 Aug 2005 , 3:01am
post #2 of 28

I put a layer of icing on, smooth it the best I can then stick the cake in the freezer for 15-20 minutes, take it out and smooth again and repeat until the cake looks the way you want. I learned this from another message board poster who is truly talented. And it works-at least it did for me! icon_smile.gif

vitade Posted 2 Aug 2005 , 11:49am
post #3 of 28

I would say also to make sure you really lay on the icing. Make sure you put more than enough incing on with your spatula in the center of the cake and then slowly smooth it out to the sides. Always clear off your spatula when you lift it from the cake. Then just keep smoothing until you get smooth.

Have you ever tried the icer tip? It works really fast! Once you apply your frosting you just smooth over the edges and your done! thumbs_up.gif

Rose

msumissa Posted 2 Aug 2005 , 12:01pm
post #4 of 28

A hot knife really works well for me. After I get it as smooth as possible I stick my off set spatula in boiling water and then once it set for a couple of seconds in the water I take it out, shake off the excess water and smooth. It comes out beautifully!

dodibug Posted 2 Aug 2005 , 2:06pm
post #5 of 28

Oooohh-I love my icing tip. The best couple of dollars I've ever spent. I used to use the hot water on my spatula and it worked ok for me but I always seem to make such a mess! Maybe I'm just a mess?!? lol

MrsMissey Posted 2 Aug 2005 , 3:24pm
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dodibug

Oooohh-I love my icing tip. The best couple of dollars I've ever spent. I used to use the hot water on my spatula and it worked ok for me but I always seem to make such a mess! Maybe I'm just a mess?!? lol




...I couldn't agree more! I would be lost without my icer tip! icon_lol.gif As far as the water thing......I don't use that either. Just don't find it necessary!

katiebug Posted 3 Aug 2005 , 1:39pm
post #7 of 28

I agree for a non crusting Bc hot water works the best. It does take a little practice but I can get a nice smooth side and a nice crisp top edge just by using the hot water method.

aunt-judy Posted 25 Aug 2005 , 8:38pm
post #8 of 28

yep -- clean hot palette knife, and just a few droplettes (even smaller than a droplet) of water on the icing surface: the fat in the icing repels the water, allowing your knife to glide really smoothly. always keep a damp towel handy to wipe your knife off with between passes (after removing the excess icing onto the side of the bowl). thumbs_up.gif

Tazalexis Posted 29 Aug 2005 , 12:17am
post #9 of 28

Hey guys, have you ever tried using ice cold water??? I used to do the hot water then some one told me to try cold water with ice cubes in it. It worked better that the hot water. I realized that the hot water sort of makes the icing sticky and a little harder to spread. The cold water stiffens it as if it's crusting butter cream and at the same time it's not too stiff where it can't spread.
PS. On the crusting butter cream. To get it to taste good. Add some almond flavor along with the vanilla extract and the butter flavor.

aunt-judy Posted 29 Aug 2005 , 2:03pm
post #10 of 28

Tazalexis: that ice-water trick sounds like a winner! and actually, i like to use vanilla, almond, lemon, and orange combo in both my sugar cookies and buttercream for an amazing flavour (reminiscent of froot loops cereal, but with a refined note from the almond flavour).

SugarCreations Posted 3 Sep 2005 , 3:25pm
post #11 of 28

Hi
If you go to your local hardware store and purchase a paint edger these work great. I got mine for $.99. Also you can use a non print papertowel to smooth your icing you will want to use the non printed side of a Viva papertowel. Viva towels do not have a pattern. The icing will take the patterns of printed paper towels.Bounty towels have a diamond pattern that can be transferred to the icing.

cakemommy Posted 3 Sep 2005 , 3:43pm
post #12 of 28

The icer tip works really well. Just have enough icing in the bag and squeeze away. Use your long angled spatula to smooth along with a turn table and VIOLA! This is all I use!!!


Amy

cakemommy Posted 3 Sep 2005 , 3:47pm
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by aunt-judy

yep -- clean hot palette knife, and just a few droplettes (even smaller than a droplet) of water on the icing surface: the fat in the icing repels the water, allowing your knife to glide really smoothly. always keep a damp towel handy to wipe your knife off with between passes (after removing the excess icing onto the side of the bowl). thumbs_up.gif





I've also used a spray bottle on mist to wet my cakes to get a smooth finish! I just hold the bottle a ways from the cake and one little mist......


Amy

tirby Posted 13 Sep 2005 , 1:40am
post #14 of 28

I mist my cakes too. I've always used hot water. Might try ice next time!
Oh the puddy knife thing. You know the wide ones work great for the sides.

DiH Posted 20 Sep 2005 , 1:53pm
post #15 of 28

For more discussion of the same topic, clicky here: http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-7683.html


Di

chaptlps Posted 27 Oct 2005 , 2:19am
post #16 of 28

icon_cool.gif I decorate cakes at a large store where speed is of the essence. I try to frost cakes frozen with bc, keeps the crumbs down, but if it's thawed, i use the cake icer tip. The way i use the tip is probably different than most folks use it. I pipe the sides and then around the top edges and then put a spoon full of frosting in the middle, smooth it from the center to the sides and then the sides with a knife first then I groom it with a scraper. If there are bubble holes, I then go back over it with a hot wet knife, being careful to have the knife clean after every swipe. This has proven to be quite fast and efficient with little waste frosting.

bakersofcakes Posted 27 Oct 2005 , 2:38am
post #17 of 28

Isn't the icing tip the big (huge) tip with one flat side & the other a ribbed design? If so, when I use that huge tip, I end up with way too much icing on the cake & it's very uneven. What am I doing wrong?

vitade Posted 27 Oct 2005 , 9:15am
post #18 of 28

Just like any other tip, you have to have a steady motion and even pressure. If you move it at a steady pace, it should work just fine. It's better to "work off" the extra frosting than to keep adding frosting.

bakersofcakes Posted 27 Oct 2005 , 2:48pm
post #19 of 28

Thanks, Vitade, I'll give it another try.

vitade Posted 28 Oct 2005 , 9:57am
post #20 of 28

Your welcome and I'm sure if you keep trying, YOUR GONNA LOVE IT!

kalikw Posted 29 Oct 2005 , 4:57am
post #21 of 28

I also use a bench scraper, it has a straight edge and as I smoothin the icing I turn the turntable fast and you get a nice smooth finish.

bakersofcakes Posted 30 Oct 2005 , 12:44am
post #22 of 28

Is a bench scraper the same as a mud knife (for joint compound)? icon_confused.gif Thanks

PerryStCakes Posted 31 Oct 2005 , 9:33pm
post #23 of 28

This is my specialty - I have it down to an art! Now if you asked about fondant on a square cake - there I can't help (darn corners!). But this- this i can do.

I didn't read all the posts (sheepish!) but if its a merigue based buttercream, (italian, swiss, I can give recipe if you want), then crumb coat it - then refridgerate (10 mins). Then coat for real - get it pretty straight, but don't fret.
Then refridgerate another 10-15 min (uncovered is fine unless you have some strong garlic scent in there).
Take it out and now...
Get your metal spatula (whichever is appropriate for your cake) and a mug/glass of very hot water.
Soak spatula in there, wipe it a little with paper towel (don't want to drip hot water all over your cake now) and start to go over the cake.
It is MAGIC. Keep re-dipping into mug as needed.
It works b/c the heat on the spatula melts the butter a bit and it just smooths right out. You can even get it to a shine! But watch not to "overdo" it - you can start to bring out the yellow in the butter (I don't know at what point, but don't worry - you can just re-ice, re-refridgerate, and re-work).

Hope this helps!

XOXOXO
-Perry

sweet4tooth Posted 6 Nov 2005 , 7:01pm
post #24 of 28

Hi PerryStCakes, I would like to have a copy of your Swiss or Italian Merigu bc icing. Can I use it to decorate and make flowers with this icing? Can it also be out at room tempreture? Please help me in answering my e-mail. My e-mail address is [email protected]
Thank you so much.

PerryStCakes Posted 7 Nov 2005 , 3:17pm
post #25 of 28

Sweet4tooth - no prob - I'll send it over ASAP!

kmcguire Posted 11 Nov 2005 , 12:15pm
post #26 of 28

try:

5c. confectioners sugar
3/4 c. crisco
1/2 c. water
1/3 c. non dairy coffee creamer
1 tsp. vanilla
1 tsp. butter flavor
1/2 tsp salt

Mix on low until all incorporated then beat on high for about 5 minutes. Crusts very little, but enough to smooth .....tastes great.

blittle6 Posted 11 Nov 2005 , 12:23pm
post #27 of 28

Hi,

Are there any tips on getting the corners where the tops meet the sides so nice and perfect. I always have trouble with that!

Thanks!
Berta

goof9j Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 12:30pm
post #28 of 28

AI have found the paper towel method does not work on non crusting icing:grin:

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