Adjustable Pastry Board - Worth The Money?

Decorating By born2bake Updated 26 Sep 2013 , 12:38am by Royalicing101

born2bake Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 7:56pm
post #1 of 12

I fell upon this while looking for cookie cutters and my eyes popped out of my head. I was actually looking to work with a wood craftsman to design and make this for me. Now that I know it can be purchased, I'd really like to get your thoughts on it. Has anyone ever used this? Is it worth the money. For a beginner like me getting frustrated on 'mastering' the thickness on cake dough and fondant, this looks like it could be a dream come true.

http://www.armchair.com/store/gourmet/baking/doughboard1.html

Your thoughts, please.

B2B

11 replies
CakeDiva73 Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 8:05pm
post #2 of 12

Wow - that looks very cool.......I have a bit of trouble getting even thickness on cookies so this would be a dream come true. But $60 is alot. I know I could built a non-adjusting one for my cookies (which are all about 1/2" anyway) for way cheaper but it sure would be nice to have an adjustable on to handle all kinds of pastry thickness.

If I could afford it, I would give it a whirl! icon_razz.gif But since I can't, off to Home Depot I go ~ lol icon_lol.gif

jmt1714 Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 8:13pm
post #3 of 12

http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=143030

or you could get rolling pin rings for 7 bucks and do the same thing.

springlakecake Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 8:14pm
post #4 of 12

looks cool. But I know some people just use flat wooden sticks (I am having trouble coming up with the name right now...) on the sides of the dough and then the rolling pin on top of that. Does that make sense?? A lot cheaper that way probably.

q2wheels Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 8:23pm
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by merissa

looks cool. But I know some people just use flat wooden sticks (I am having trouble coming up with the name right now...) on the sides of the dough and then the rolling pin on top of that. Does that make sense?? A lot cheaper that way probably.


That's exactly what I do! I have glued two 2" x 1/8 balsa wood slats together and cut them 12 inches long. I use them as guides when I roll my cookie dough out (which is between 2 pieces of parchment or wax paper). Perfect cookies every time.

Toni Ann

playingwithsugar Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 8:24pm
post #6 of 12

I have seen this before, on another website.

The issue I have with this board is the limitation of size. You would not be able to roll out sticky buns or larger sheets of puff pastry.

Also, it looks as though the rolling surface is made from several pieces, as opposed to a solid piece of wood. That risks splintering. Also, if it is not made of maple, forget it. Eventually, constant washing will cause it to split.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

Jenn2179 Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 8:38pm
post #7 of 12

I have this. I got it quite a while ago. I also have the rolling pin rings. Now that I have the rolling pin rings I never use this anymore.

born2bake Posted 1 Oct 2007 , 1:07am
post #8 of 12

Great thoughts on this and replies. Gives me a lot to think about (the rolling pin rings, splinting wood, $$). Actually I do have the rolling pin rings but they don't fit on my rolling pin - a very old rolling pin (30+ years) that Mom passed on to me - it's a sentimental thing. But for the cost difference, an updated rolling pin so I could use my rings would be more cost effective. I could use my old rolling pin as a kitchen wall piece.

So . . . . any suggestions on rolling pins? Type of wood that is best? What size should I purchase?

Again, thank you all!

B2B

leah_s Posted 1 Oct 2007 , 2:32am
post #9 of 12

I have the thick rubber band things for my rolling pin and they work fine. Also in pastry school we rolled between two metal bars which were generally referred to as "candy bars" because they would contain poured sugar from running all over the table top. Same idea as the wooden sticks that others referred to.

ValMommytoDanny Posted 1 Oct 2007 , 4:15am
post #10 of 12

That looks neat, but I would hate to be confined to a small area...

I use wooden dowels or the rings to measure thickness. Love it because I control the area - I move the dowels or use the rings.

Cool product though... icon_smile.gif Thanks for sharing.

playingwithsugar Posted 1 Oct 2007 , 9:16am
post #11 of 12

A rolling pin with a long barrel and independent handles is best. By independent handles, I mean handles that have ball bearings in them, and will stay stationary while the pin turns.

If you do a lot of rolling, consider one with a silicone coating or one which a silicone sleeve will fit over.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

Royalicing101 Posted 26 Sep 2013 , 12:38am
post #12 of 12

AI dontb like the rings but use wood to measure thickness having my husband make me something like the board ;-)

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