sherik Posted 30 Sep 2007 , 2:14am
post #1 of

Is anyone able to tell me how to cast a clear Isomalt dome using a Pyrex bowl?
My questions are:

1. Do I oil the bowl before pouring?

2. How do I keep it from puddling in the bottom of the bowl?
How do I keep it an even coating inside the entire bowl?

3. Or, do I pour the honey consistancy Isomalt over the outside of the bowl
to create a dome?

I really need some advice on this.

Thanks to any and all who are willing to help.

18 replies
Steady2Hands Posted 1 Oct 2007 , 10:31pm
post #2 of

I'm not sure what an Isomalt dome is but I made a dome this past Spring for my lighthouse cake. I used the small Wilton sports ball pan. I put plastic wrap on the outside of the pan. Then I rolled out fondant and put it on it. It took several days to dry.

Silly me just re-read your post and I see where you want the dome to be clear. In that case, I'm not sure what to do. icon_redface.gif

sherik Posted 2 Oct 2007 , 12:18am
post #3 of

Thank you Steady2Hands, you were the only person to respond.
I guess this isn't possible, from what I have seen in all the forums, if anyone has knowledge of a technique they are always happy to share & help.
I must picture something no one here has tried.
If I succeed by trial & error I will post a picture and instructions thumbs_up.gif

Steady2Hands Posted 2 Oct 2007 , 5:49am
post #4 of

You're welcome. After I realized that I misunderstood what you were asking I almost didn't send my comments. But I remembered that several people had read your post and didn't comment so I went ahead and sent mine to get yours bumped back to the top. Surely someone knows what to do. It just hasn't been read by anyone who does yet. Hopefully the right person will see it. I agree with you ~ if someone knows what to do they'll be happy to help thumbs_up.gif .

I did a little research on Isomalt. It was interesting. You helped me learn something new icon_biggrin.gif .

cakeflake Posted 2 Oct 2007 , 6:25am
post #5 of

Im not sure if this is the same thing but I've seen both Emerril and Martha Stewart do sugar cages or domes. They melted the sugar mixture and then drizzled it around the inside of a greased bowl in swirling motions. The bowl was either metal or glass, I don't remember which but I know it wasn't plastic/flexible. It may have been chilled as well. They let the sugar sit and harden for a while and then just loosened it by gently turning/twisting the whole cage to loosen it from the sides of the bowl. Then it slipped right out. If this is what you're looking for, it makes a golden, glass looking bowl and is quite pretty. Maybe you could do a search on foodnetwork or Martha's webpage to get the exact instructions/recipe, Hope this helps- good luck!

Godiva711 Posted 2 Oct 2007 , 8:26pm
post #6 of

I think I read somewhere that Isomalt doesn't caramelize...?

Lalana Posted 2 Oct 2007 , 8:39pm
post #7 of

I took the Wilton sugar art class and she demonstrated the technique but I haven't personally done it. Here's what she did with us. Turn the stainless steel bowl upside down and drizzle the isomalt in whatever pattern you want. The instructor was able to pick up the isomalt bowl very soon after she drizzled it, but she poured it very thin. You don't need to grease it, I think that would actually interfere with the setting of the isomalt. It naturally doesn't stick. Hope that's what you were needing!

GenGen Posted 2 Oct 2007 , 8:46pm
post #8 of

this is very interesting to follow. i wish i could have helped answer but i'm delighted to learn icon_smile.gif

so see sherik- your helping others as well as yourself by posting icon_smile.gif

sherik Posted 2 Oct 2007 , 11:57pm
post #9 of

WOW! Thank you all for replying. I need a solid dome and it sounds like I can turn the bowl over and pour the Isomalt over it to achieve a clear dome.
I will post a pic after I get up the nerve to attempt this. Isomalt is about $5.10 per pound (including shipping) so I'm a little nervous icon_rolleyes.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 4:35am

I have some experience with Isomalt & sugar work. I've done the drizzled cages on lightly greased metal domes & spoon backs. It's a great effect. Also, Isomalt does "burn" or "caramelize" if overheated.
Also, if you don't grease the metal dome, the Isomalt will stick to it and have to be soaked off in water, wasting it altogether.

In order to get a solid dome I think the best way is to blow a large ball and then cut off the unnecessary portion.

If blowing a large ball isn't an option, you may be able to pour Isomalt inside of a greased metal bowl. It would have to be very fluid when you pour it. You'd need to swirl it around rather quickly, and of course, it would be very hot. This would probably get you a thin, lightweight product.

If the process doesn't work, your Isomalt isn't wasted because it can be re-melted and used over and over.

HTH.
Rae

bkeith Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 3:29pm

For a solid dome, my first thought was to pour a bit of Isomalt and swirl the bowl to cover evenly. But then I thought that might be a real pain and could potentially lead to some burns as you slosh hot Isomalt everywhere.

I think I'd fill the bowl with cooked Isomalt and let it sit a few minutes so the Isomalt touching the bowl will start to set, then pour out the rest back into the pan. May take a couple layers, and you'll have a bit of clean up to do where you pour it out. But I think that'd work.

And definitely grease the inside of the bowl before filling it. I'd also suggest a metal bowl rather than a glass one. Glass holds onto heat, and it would take longer for the shell to set up.

Sounds like a cool project. Let us know what you do and how it works!

tonedna Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 3:38pm

What is Isomalt?... Hoping someone can explain.. I hope you post photos!..

sherik Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 5:28pm

Thank you BlakesCakes & bkeith. It is reassuring to know I was on the right track. I will use a stainless steel bowl.

Definitions of Isomalt on the Web:

* is a disaccharide polyol, approximately 45-65 percent as sweet as sucrose. Can be used in candies, gums, ice cream, jams and jellies, fillings and frostings, beverages and baked products. As a sweetener/bulking agent, it has no off-flavors and works well in combination with other sweeteners. FDA allows the use of a caloric value of 2.0 calories per gram.

tonedna Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 5:33pm

[quote="sherik"]Thank you BlakesCakes & bkeith. It is reassuring to know I was on the right track. I will use a stainless steel bowl.

Definitions of Isomalt on the Web:

* is a disaccharide polyol, approximately 45-65 percent as sweet as sucrose. Can be used in candies, gums, ice cream, jams and jellies, fillings and frostings, beverages and baked products. As a sweetener/bulking agent, it has no off-flavors and works well in combination with other sweeteners. FDA allows the use of a caloric value of 2.0 calories per gram.[/quote



THANKS...

BCJean Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 5:54pm

I hope this works for you. It is an interesting project. I don't know how thin it needs to be but, I know I have a set of stainless steel mixing bowls and I would think you could put two sizes together and pour the syrup between them and get a bowl that would be about 1/2 thick.

MFitz Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 6:20pm

I'm just starting to work with isomalt

In a home kitchen- how do you heat your isomalt and how do you keep it heated as you work?

The dome sounds like an interesting project! Good luck!

sherik Posted 3 Oct 2007 , 11:54pm

Since I don't have a heat lamp, warming box or anything other than a great thermometer, I will be heating my pre-prepped (see below) Isomalt in the microwave then pouring.


I prepared 2 lbs. of isomalt and than let it harden. I broke up the slab and put it in zip-lock bags in an airtight container with silica gel. When I need it I just pop it in the microwave and its already balanced with the water. The more you microwave isomalt the harder it will get to use. You cook out the water every time it gets liquid at all. After a few times heated in the microwave you may need to re-hydrate it. Weigh the isomalt, melt it, and add 5-10% water to it again.
I was told that when you add water to liquid or very hot isomalt do it VERY SLOWLY. Otherwise it can get under the isomalt and cause steam and explode liquid sugar all over. It sputters and spits a lot when you add the water, mixing is not necessary. Pour after sizzling stops.

Ibake Posted 4 Oct 2007 , 2:13am

After you melt your isamalt put the pan in a bowl of water to stop the cooking and let the pan rest 5 minutes on a towel. This will help settle out the air bubbles.

I would recomend pouring the isamalt over an inverted bowl on a cake rack. After it sets it will release. You can clean up the edges of your dome with a blow touch.

Hope this helps - best of luck!

sherik Posted 5 Oct 2007 , 12:09am

Welcome to CC Ibake!

Thank you, will the Isomalt release by itself, or do I need to spray the bowl with canola spray?

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