Food Vacuum Packaging System

Decorating By kay52178 Updated 2 Aug 2011 , 11:55am by luddroth

kay52178 Posted 18 Sep 2007 , 7:12pm
post #1 of 10

I'd like to invest in a food vacuuming system or food saver. Does anyone recommend the brand they use? What are its benefits, downfalls?? Is it easy to use?

Also, is the material it uses to cover the food clear so you can see the food?

Thanks!
Kristie

9 replies
Melvira Posted 18 Sep 2007 , 7:18pm
post #2 of 10

FOODSAVER!!! Hands down! I have tried others, but this is the best I've seen.

* The bags are clear, you can easily see through them.
* They are very thick, high quality, so they keep out freezer burn.
* It's ridiculously easy to use.
* It's not that expensive in my opinion.
* The bags can be washed and reused to save money, though they get just a tiny bit smaller each time until they become too small to use. (You cut off the very top to open them, so they shrink like a half inch per use or so.)
* The newer versions offer canisters and other 'add-on's' with their model that make it possible to do so many things.

You cannot go wrong with a FOODSAVER. I love mine! HTH

Almost forgot, the only downfall... You must be careful if what you are vacuum sealing is 'juicy' because the liquid can get sucked out. This is true for every brand I've ever seen though, so it's not a problem with the FOODSAVER brand.

nicrysmom Posted 18 Sep 2007 , 7:24pm
post #3 of 10

I have had both a Black and Decker food saver and a FOOD SAVER food saver and I wholeheartedly back the FOOD SAVER!!!! My B&D was hard to find bags for and often didnt seal the first time around. After 2 years we switched to the FS and I LOVE IT!!! We bought some canisters and lunch/side dish containers and I LOVE THOSE TOO!!! I put my lettuce in one of the canisters and it keeps for over a week sometimes up to 2 weeks. I have kept strawberries in a canister FOREVER!!!

I CANT GET ENOUGH OF IT!!! I go around looking for this to vacuum seal!!!

OK off my soapbox - seriously, I really do like mine and we got it on sale for a steal!!

HTH

3tiers Posted 18 Sep 2007 , 7:27pm
post #4 of 10

I would caution you about using the FOODSAVER or any other vacuum system. We had just purchased one, and sealed some cinnamon rolls to put in the freezer just to see how they would come out. Well, the next week, the health inspector was here and asked about them. I told him we were not selling them, they were just an experiment. He said "I wouldn't eat them, either." He said the only thing he would use a vacuum sealer for is something like raw meat which you intend to cook after you take it out. The lack of oxygen in the bags creates the perfect environment for the bacteria that causes botulism (sp?). I had no idea! So, needless to say, we only use the FOODSAVER to seal bags, not to vacuum seal them. I have since discovered a heat sealer from the ULINE catalog that I love even more. It is ready as soon as you plug it in, works much faster, and is smaller. You can purchase the poly bags from there in an endless array of sizes as well. We use our everyday! I even purcahsed one for my house. Hope this helps!

Melvira Posted 18 Sep 2007 , 7:32pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3tiers

I would caution you about using the FOODSAVER or any other vacuum system. We had just purchased one, and sealed some cinnamon rolls to put in the freezer just to see how they would come out. Well, the next week, the health inspector was here and asked about them. I told him we were not selling them, they were just an experiment. He said "I wouldn't eat them, either." He said the only thing he would use a vacuum sealer for is something like raw meat which you intend to cook after you take it out. The lack of oxygen in the bags creates the perfect environment for the bacteria that causes botulism (sp?). I had no idea!




Are you serious?? How is it legal for them to sell them then? They show in the commercials that they are using them for uncooked food as well as leftovers, etc. Can the bacteria survive the freezing process?

Ladivacrj Posted 18 Sep 2007 , 7:45pm
post #6 of 10

I did a quick check online for some info. There is a bacteria that can grow without air but only under certain circumstances.

The more sites I glanced at the more this issue can go both ways.

And it doesn't appear to be the freezing process.

They noted mostly the thawing process. In which case, no matter whether you have vacuum sealed something or not, the thawing process is always a cause to be cautious and done properly.

melvin01 Posted 18 Sep 2007 , 7:57pm
post #7 of 10

I don't get that. I would like to think that a health inspector knows what he is talking about, but how can botulism or any other virus survive without air or in a frozen environment?

Something seems off to me on that. Would be interested if someone got some solid evidence on that one since I use my vacuum sealer to do cake toppers for weddings.

I just did a bit of research on the internet and, of course, it didn't say much about it other than being careful with canning or sealing foods. Mainly be as clean as possible with your hands and work surface and keep any cuts on your skin from contacting the food...and cook frozen foods to kill any bacteria, but that only works with vegetables and meats, meat being the main thing that contains most food-borne diseases, which, if you've seen a slaughterhouse or any processing plant (or the lax regulations on USDA approved meat--sorry, I'm ranting), I'm surprised that there isn't more of an epidemic of poisonings.

This is a first I've heard about this, but interesting to find more info on it. It appears that botulism is very rare (only like 100 people out of 295 million in the US a year get it), so it's a very tiny amount.

chanielisalevy Posted 2 Aug 2011 , 11:37am
post #8 of 10

I have the foodsaver and I bought the mini one, handheld about $15- LOVE IT! I use it for fondant only. I shmear the fondant with crisco, slip it into a bag, seal the bag (like a ziplock) hold the machine over the little circle on the side of the bag, and watch all the air get sucked out! The bag is then opened like a ziplock, washed, and resued. LOVE, LOVE, LOVE it! Best $15 I ever spent.

Bluehue Posted 2 Aug 2011 , 11:46am
post #9 of 10

I bought myself one about 2 years ago -
Use it for seafood and meat and for storing/freezing my fondant, as i buy that in 7kgs lots.

I packed all my *tools of the trade* in a bag then sealed it when going interstate - nothing wriggled out of that bag thumbs_up.gif

Bluehue

luddroth Posted 2 Aug 2011 , 11:55am
post #10 of 10

Food Saver is great! Fondant, chocolate, and pastry or any dough stays fresh sooooo much longer. Great tool.

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