Cakes Drooping In The Middle! Help

Decorating By jjmoore Updated 14 Apr 2008 , 8:12pm by mjs4492

jjmoore Posted 14 Sep 2007 , 8:59pm
post #1 of 8

ok i know i have read about this on the board before but i can't find it now when i need it so i'm asking agian. My 10 inch round cake is falling in the center, i'm using wilton pans and the moistened wrap around the edges to keep them from getting brown but i can't get the middles to get done enough to not FALL. Any and all tips are appreciated. I"m very new to this and is the problem only going to happen to me with round cakes or all big cakes?

7 replies
Cake_Princess Posted 14 Sep 2007 , 9:04pm
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjmoore

ok i know i have read about this on the board before but i can't find it now when i need it so i'm asking agian. My 10 inch round cake is falling in the center, i'm using wilton pans and the moistened wrap around the edges to keep them from getting brown but i can't get the middles to get done enough to not FALL. Any and all tips are appreciated. I"m very new to this and is the problem only going to happen to me with round cakes or all big cakes?





Copy and paste the URL listed below you should find the answer there.

http://www.baking911.com/cakes/problems.htm

Brujalita Posted 14 Sep 2007 , 9:05pm
post #3 of 8

The problem could be that the batter was over mixed - it will fall in the middle. What you may also try to do in baking bigger than 8" is after you're prepped your pan, invert your flower nail (first make sure there isn't any floral clay stuck to to the top) in the center of the pan so that the flat side of the nail is on the bottom of the pan and then pour your batter over it, making sure the nail stays centered. Once the cake is baked and the layer is removed from the pan, you'll only have a small hole where the flower nail "stuck" into the cake. I would continue using the bake-easy strips to help the batter cook evenly all the way around. HTH

JoAnnB Posted 14 Sep 2007 , 9:05pm
post #4 of 8

You can use an inverted flower nail as a heating to help bake the centers of the cake even with the exterior. I use one in a 10" pan.

ceshell Posted 14 Sep 2007 , 9:15pm
post #5 of 8

In addition to the flower nail, make sure your oven isn't too hot. This happened to me numerous times even with the nail, and turning down the temp by 25 degrees made a vast improvement.

btw Cake_Princess, thanks for that link! I've been to that website a lot but never noticed that page. Awesome info!

KoryAK Posted 14 Sep 2007 , 10:45pm
post #6 of 8

An oven that is too hot will cause the center to dome up high, as it is still rising as more and more of the edge sets; this is called the X fault. The M fault is when the oven is too low, and it sounds like what you have going on here. Those lovely air bubbles just keep expanding and end up popping before the crumb has a chance to set around them and it ends up falling in the middle. Raise the temp a bit and/or get an oven thermometer to make sure what you are dialing is what you are getting.

ceshell Posted 14 Sep 2007 , 11:14pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

An oven that is too hot will cause the center to dome up high, as it is still rising as more and more of the edge sets; this is called the X fault. The M fault is when the oven is too low, and it sounds like what you have going on here. Those lovely air bubbles just keep expanding and end up popping before the crumb has a chance to set around them and it ends up falling in the middle. Raise the temp a bit and/or get an oven thermometer to make sure what you are dialing is what you are getting.




Good point; in my case when the oven was too hot the cakes indeed domed but fell upon cooling (and werent' cooked through in the middle). The OP never mentioned doming.

Thanks for the clarification thumbs_up.gif

mjs4492 Posted 14 Apr 2008 , 8:12pm
post #8 of 8

Interesting topic and replies!

I use only 3" deep pans. Sometimes the cakes are not cooking in the very middle? For example, the "Durable Cake" recipe here had been suggested to me to try. Contains sour cream and pudding used with eggs and a box mix.
Out of 3 cakes made, 1 was cooked all the way through. Now I'm a bit scared to try other cake recipes without making a trial one.

I also use the flower nail and bake at 350 (my oven has a button to convert it to convection) so it shows its baking at 325.

So, drooping in the middle - oven too low/batter mixed too long; doming - oven too hot.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%