Wanna know a secret?????

Decorating By daisyblue Updated 1 Oct 2015 , 12:02pm by CakeCrystals

BearLuvsCakes Posted 6 Nov 2006 , 4:36pm
post #61 of 645

My one tip would be make sure that you have a couple of each same size pan. It makes baking multiple cakes way faster. I have two of each size. At least I won't have to spend all day baking one at a time!

doleta Posted 6 Nov 2006 , 7:10pm
post #62 of 645

I use Kahlua or Vanilla Rum for cake balls.
Shhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!! Don't tell my Sunday School class! icon_lol.gif

m0use Posted 6 Nov 2006 , 9:02pm
post #63 of 645

I learned a new tip this weekend at the WI ICES DOS, to prevent the icing from squeezing out of the back of the bag: fill your bag, roll/fold top down on bag, then wrap it up all tight on the end with a thick rubber band.
It works like a charm, all the decorators that had their colors pre-mixed had their bags set up this way.

Diesel Posted 6 Nov 2006 , 9:13pm
post #64 of 645

Ohmygoodies --

I actually just made a strawberry cake from a box mix using the Durable Cake recipe found in the recipes section. The reviews from the birthday party was that it was very yummy and I have another friend requesting it.

No great tips from me yet as I just started decorating in June but I truly appreciate all the ones I have gotten from this site!! [/quote]

frosting111 Posted 6 Nov 2006 , 9:17pm
post #65 of 645

I always fill my icing bags,push all the icing down real good, twist the end of the bag tight, and use bread twisters to keep the icing from back up...I also store my left over icings in the disposable bags, kneed well and use again on another projects.

Who ever posted on here about putting stick butter in a glass of warm water THANKS cause I forgot to set my butter out this morning to make Chocolate Syrup icing and did that to make up time and it worked like a charm!!!

BTW..That Chocolate Syrup icing is to die for...OMGOODNESS GRACIOUS its good! ya'll !!

boonenati Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 12:39am
post #66 of 645

This is a great tip i got at a workshop. The lady used it with royal icing but it can be used with buttercream also. She grabbed a big freezer bag, and pulled one of the bottom corners through the coupler in a piping bag. Then she cut the tip, and folded it over the coupler so that the freezer bag would be tightened when the tip and the screw was put in place. She then put the icing in the freezer bag, and tied it up, and then pulled the piping bag over it. No icing escaped, and when it was done, the whole icing bag was still clean, the freezer bag can be thrown out, and you can move on to another colour without having to wash your bag.
I hope it makes sense, kinda hard to explain without seeing it ; )
Nati

yellowdog Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 1:12am
post #67 of 645

Here's one for the DUH catagory, I recently finished my first 11 x 15 sheet cake and I didn't double cake board it and I wrinkled the icing putting it into the box. So always double board or foam core board your larger cakes. I'm a newbie, so live and learn.

dldbrou Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 3:17am
post #68 of 645

I never double board my cakes, instead I buy a 4X8 sheet of blue or pink 1" ridged styrofoam board. I can then cut any size or shape I need. The cost for each sheet is about $8. I find that it is not only sturdy but very lite to pick up. Of course I cover the styrofoam.

Zmama Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 3:38am
post #69 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by dldbrou

I never double board my cakes, instead I buy a 4X8 sheet of blue or pink 1" ridged styrofoam board. I can then cut any size or shape I need. The cost for each sheet is about $8. I find that it is not only sturdy but very lite to pick up. Of course I cover the styrofoam.


Where do you find this?


I'm asking FI to make several plywood cake boards for my Christmas presents!

dldbrou Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 3:41am
post #70 of 645

I usually get them at Lowes or Home Depot. It's near the plywood section. The blue or pink usually have a plastic coating so that they don't crumble like white strofoam.

kaecakes Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 3:46am
post #71 of 645

I personally don't like disposable decorating bags but when I use them I place them in a featherweight bag, that leaves the featherweight bag clean, but also gives you the grip of the featherweight. This is also handy if the disposable blows a hole.

The other tip I have is if you need a lot of colored icing ( pastel ) you can add the color to your water . You usually add the same amount of water to each batch. This works very well for ivory icing for a whole wedding cake.

kelleym Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 4:08am
post #72 of 645

I always measure crisco and sour cream by weight, not volume. I have a digital food scale that I use *all* the time for all sorts of things. 1 cup of Crisco = 6.8 oz. Just tare the scale with your tub of crisco sitting on it, so it reads 0.00, and scoop until you're at -6.8. 1 cup of sour cream = 8 oz, same method. Saves me washing a lot of measuring cups!

ckkerber Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 4:39am
post #73 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zmama

Quote:
Originally Posted by dldbrou

I never double board my cakes, instead I buy a 4X8 sheet of blue or pink 1" ridged styrofoam board. I can then cut any size or shape I need. The cost for each sheet is about $8. I find that it is not only sturdy but very lite to pick up. Of course I cover the styrofoam.

Where do you find this?


I'm asking FI to make several plywood cake boards for my Christmas presents!




Thanks, Zmama . . . you just added something to my hubby's TO-DO list! I'm sure he'll thank you. icon_lol.gif

crafty01 Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 5:37am
post #74 of 645

Have lots of couplers it helps in the long run and extra tips too

KylesMom Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 11:31am
post #75 of 645

These are tips that I've picked up from this site that haven't been mention on this thread yet.

Violet cancels yellow--I use butter in my buttercream. The violet cancels the yellow color out.

Microwave your tips--Place your tips into a microwave safe bowl, cover the tips completely with water, add 1 or 2 drops of dishsoap and microwave to 2 minutes.

Zmama Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 1:23pm
post #76 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckkerber

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zmama

Quote:
Originally Posted by dldbrou

I never double board my cakes, instead I buy a 4X8 sheet of blue or pink 1" ridged styrofoam board. I can then cut any size or shape I need. The cost for each sheet is about $8. I find that it is not only sturdy but very lite to pick up. Of course I cover the styrofoam.

Where do you find this?


I'm asking FI to make several plywood cake boards for my Christmas presents!



Thanks, Zmama . . . you just added something to my hubby's TO-DO list! I'm sure he'll thank you. icon_lol.gif





I would go with 1/2" thick. I wouldn't trust 1/4" for the larger cakes, and he can cut several pieces out of 1 sheet of wood. Unless he wants to buy 1/4 for small rounds, have him just buzz out a couple of each size you need on one sheet of 1/2. I assume you will still be using your regular dowelling system?

acookieobsession Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 3:44pm
post #77 of 645

Kylesmom...I have a question...how do you microwave tis? I must be missing something because I thought metal wasn't to go in a microwave...Thanks for all the great tips they are gret.

Thanks,

julia

NEWTODECORATING Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 3:53pm
post #78 of 645

The microwave tips to clean them is one of the greatest things I have learned on CC! Make sure to cover the tips with water and leave room in your container for bubbles. In my mind I think of it as a ultrasonic jewelry cleaner. The water covering the tips is what contains the reaction. The tips get very hot in a matter of seconds. Only microwave for 30 seconds or so, then dump off the water and rinse. The added bonus is you can wipe out your microwave very easy too! I promise you this works and you don't have to stand by with a fire extinguisher!!

ckkerber Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 4:03pm
post #79 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zmama

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckkerber

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zmama

Quote:
Originally Posted by dldbrou

I never double board my cakes, instead I buy a 4X8 sheet of blue or pink 1" ridged styrofoam board. I can then cut any size or shape I need. The cost for each sheet is about $8. I find that it is not only sturdy but very lite to pick up. Of course I cover the styrofoam.

Where do you find this?


I'm asking FI to make several plywood cake boards for my Christmas presents!



Thanks, Zmama . . . you just added something to my hubby's TO-DO list! I'm sure he'll thank you. icon_lol.gif




I would go with 1/2" thick. I wouldn't trust 1/4" for the larger cakes, and he can cut several pieces out of 1 sheet of wood. Unless he wants to buy 1/4 for small rounds, have him just buzz out a couple of each size you need on one sheet of 1/2. I assume you will still be using your regular dowelling system?




Thanks! Now I'm a bit confused, though. These boards are just for the bottom of your cake, right? So they don't impact doweling or anything you'd do on the cake . . . ??? I was assuming that you'd treat your cake the way you normally would and then just put this board underneath the whole thing for support in transport. is this right?

elvisb Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 4:17pm
post #80 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammaquinn

Wow...thanks so much! I have learned so much here...hope to put all these things to use soon! icon_smile.gif




Reynolds sells freezer paper. It is next to aluminum foil in the grocery store. Basically it's a heavy white paper that is slick on one side--more so than waxed paper. It is water proof and grease proof. I use it to cover my cake boards. Much neater looking than foil. You can also buy it from the meat dept at your supermarket, but I have found that Reynolds is cheaper. That was a surprise to me.

dldbrou Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 4:24pm
post #81 of 645

ck, RIGHT--The board or styrofoam go under your cake. If your cake is heavy and your board is to thin, then your cake will crack in transportation. The dowels are also a support for your cake used in the usual manner.

mammaquinn Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 5:14pm
post #82 of 645

Thanks ElvisB--Will go out today to get some!!

KylesMom Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 5:14pm
post #83 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by acookieobsession

Kylesmom...I have a question...how do you microwave tis? I must be missing something because I thought metal wasn't to go in a microwave...Thanks for all the great tips they are gret.

Thanks,

julia




As long as your metal tips are completely covered with water, you'll be fine.

redsoxgirl Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 5:27pm
post #84 of 645

the "styrofoam" board is called Foam Core. It is used to drymount pictures and make picture boards. It generally comes in white and black and has several thicknesses. Best be it to pick it up at Michael's where the cost is about $1.50 for 24" x 36" as opposed to $5 - 8 elsewhere.

kjgjam22 Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 10:38pm
post #85 of 645

all these tips are good tips...i dont like one of them because i think it is a waste of money and a good zip bag. with all the plastic we use in the world we can save on some zip bags...especially since we have disposable bags for icing. save the zip bags please. icon_smile.gif

Zmama Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 11:16pm
post #86 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjgjam22

all these tips are good tips...i dont like one of them because i think it is a waste of money and a good zip bag. with all the plastic we use in the world we can save on some zip bags...especially since we have disposable bags for icing. save the zip bags please. icon_smile.gif


If you dont want to use ziploc baggies, you can use saran wrap the same way. Either way is much cheaper than the disposable bags. I prefer saran wrap inside disposable bags myself, but use zips with the kids decorating, just works better for them.

AngelaDay Posted 7 Nov 2006 , 11:43pm
post #87 of 645

I'm still a newbie, and love this site. I tell everyone I know (cakies) about it. This is also a 'Duh one' which I've seen on tv a lot. Instead of dirtying up a bowl for mixing dry ingredients, I do this on parchment or wax paper. Then I can pick it up and add the dry ingredients into my mixer like a funnel. I have four kids and an big guy for a husband. I don't need any additional dirty dishes. LOL

formerbuckeye Posted 8 Nov 2006 , 12:01am
post #88 of 645

WOW! icon_surprised.gif

dldbrou Posted 8 Nov 2006 , 12:26am
post #89 of 645

The ridge styrofoam is not the same thing as foam core. It is only sold at hardware stores. It is used for insulation on walls. It is 1" thick. You can use the foam core but it is not the same thing and would not support a heavy cake.

nefgaby Posted 8 Nov 2006 , 1:08am
post #90 of 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelleym

I always measure crisco and sour cream by weight, not volume. I have a digital food scale that I use *all* the time for all sorts of things. 1 cup of Crisco = 6.8 oz. Just tare the scale with your tub of crisco sitting on it, so it reads 0.00, and scoop until you're at -6.8. 1 cup of sour cream = 8 oz, same method. Saves me washing a lot of measuring cups!




OK, hope I'm not alone here, but I believe this is one of the best tips!!! Thanks Kelleym! OK, now, not to sound "dumb" but I'm guessing the same 8 oz method used for sour cream can also be used for yogurt, puddings, etc?

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