How To Bake In A Bowl Questions.

Decorating By kathik Updated 24 Sep 2014 , 2:21am by MBalaska

kathik Posted 22 Oct 2006 , 2:21pm
post #1 of 20

I've seen mentioned baking cakes in bowls, but I still have a few questions that I hope someone here can answer.

1- How big a bowl can I bake in? I would like to use a 4qt stainless steel bowl. Is that possible?

2- How do I figure out how much cake batter I need? When baked I want it to go to the rim, and even dome in the middle.

3- Since I want it to dome, should I cook it at 350, using a heating core and bake even strips? Normally I see the suggestion to lower the temp to 325 so the cake will be level.

Thanks everyone!
Kathi

19 replies
kathik Posted 22 Oct 2006 , 11:55pm
post #2 of 20

I hope it's okay to bump this, the board seems much busier tonight than this morning!

czyadgrl Posted 23 Oct 2006 , 12:41am
post #3 of 20

I baked in a glass bowl about a week ago. I can't say that I loved the results - it browned too much on the top edges and didn't quite cook all the way.

I reduced temp to 300 and baked for what seemed like an eternity!
Used a 2.5 qt bowl, and filled it to maybe 2.5 inches from the top. Used most of one cake mix + enhanced formula recipe. I had enough left over for a perfect 1-layer 6" cake.

Good luck and post your tips when you're done!

karateka Posted 23 Oct 2006 , 12:45am
post #4 of 20

I can't say I'm an expert by any means, but here's a few thoughts:

Use a baking core, to help it get done in the middle. Don't use the bake even strips if you want it to dome.

Measure the capacity of your bowl and make enough batter to fill 2/3 to 3/4 of it.

Anybody agree/disagree?

kathik Posted 24 Oct 2006 , 1:42pm
post #5 of 20

Well, I thought I'd post my results.

I was very disappointed. I guess 4 qts is just to big to get good results. Like you, czyadgrl, I had to bake it forever. I used a can in the center for a core, but it still took so long for it to cook through that the rest of the cake tasted burnt. It didn't look burnt, but it tasted burnt.

My conclusion is that I will bake rounds, stack, and carve to get my desired shape. I hope this helps someone else!!

Kathi

KHalstead Posted 24 Oct 2006 , 1:50pm
post #6 of 20

I have baked in a 4 qt. stainless steel bowl before.....you just have to cook it at a lower temp. 300-325 and it does take like 1 hr. and 20 minutes or so....took a really long time I just kept checking it after an hour until it tested done with a skewer! It tasted wonderful......I used it to make a doll cake a few yrs. ago. I didn't even know about heating cores and bake even strips or anything back then so I didn't use anything........I did put foil over the top of it after about 45 min. so the top would brown too much and it worked fine.

kathik Posted 24 Oct 2006 , 1:56pm
post #7 of 20

Maybe I'll give it another try without the core and at a lower temp.

jen1977 Posted 24 Oct 2006 , 1:56pm
post #8 of 20

I use a glass pyrex bowl, and cover with foil about halfway thru. It does take forever to bake!

KHalstead Posted 24 Oct 2006 , 2:09pm
post #9 of 20

yeah, the glass do seem to work better I think because they're thicker....the stainless steel mixing bowls (which is what I used) are thin so you definitely gotta make sure the temp. is low or else the sides will burn. have you thought about baking a cake in a wider but shallow bowl just to give you the hump on top you're looking for?? Then do the bigger bowl with the bake even strips?? That way you can ensure the sides won't get burned.......I wonder how a cake would work if it was baked in a water bath.....that's supposed to keep cheesecakes from drying out ....wonder if it would work with regular cake or if it wouldn't ever cook throroughly?

KHalstead Posted 24 Oct 2006 , 2:12pm
post #10 of 20

okay I just read an article about baking cakes in a water bath......and evidentally it would work. Says that it keeps the cake from doming and also keeps the outside of the cake from cooking faster than the inside. hmmmm.......I'm gonna have to try it next time I bake a cake

kerririchards Posted 24 Oct 2006 , 2:17pm
post #11 of 20

I dont have an answer to the bowl question, but KHalstead, why on earth would you be so excited to move to ohio this time of year? Are you NUTS? But, I guess if you are from Jersey, you are well accustomd to the bitterly, bone-chilling COLD! I spent 3 of my 4 years of college there and BRRRRRRRR!

annebaligod Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 1:04am
post #12 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by KHalstead 

yeah, the glass do seem to work better I think because they're thicker....the stainless steel mixing bowls (which is what I used) are thin so you definitely gotta make sure the temp. is low or else the sides will burn. have you thought about baking a cake in a wider but shallow bowl just to give you the hump on top you're looking for?? Then do the bigger bowl with the bake even strips?? That way you can ensure the sides won't get burned.......I wonder how a cake would work if it was baked in a water bath.....that's supposed to keep cheesecakes from drying out ....wonder if it would work with regular cake or if it wouldn't ever cook throroughly?

hi!

has anyone tried using the even baking strips or the water bath for the glass bowl? i would like to try it but i am scared that the bowl will crack. i am trying to make a doll cake and will use the dome/bowl cake for the top of the skirt can someone please help. thanks!

 

-anne

-K8memphis Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 2:03am
post #13 of 20

well if you bake in an 8" bowl for example and then start the doll skirt with a 8" or 9" cake or both -- place the bowl cake on top of that -- you could bake a thinner cake in the bowl -- see what i mean -- baking super thick cake is not so easy -- i mean that's why there's holes in tube pans and bundt pans right?

 

just a thought for you --

annebaligod Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 3:35am
post #14 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by -K8memphis 
 

well if you bake in an 8" bowl for example and then start the doll skirt with a 8" or 9" cake or both -- place the bowl cake on top of that -- you could bake a thinner cake in the bowl -- see what i mean -- baking super thick cake is not so easy -- i mean that's why there's holes in tube pans and bundt pans right?

 

just a thought for you --

Actually this is what i plan to do. (i forgot to state that i am using an 8" bowl sorry 'bout that) what i am really worried about is baking the 8" bowl cake because the middle always tend to cook slower. i was just wondering about using a even bake strip or a water bath did anyone else get to try it? what were your results? Thanks!

MBalaska Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 8:16am
post #15 of 20

haven't tried this, but it sure sounded reasonable when I read it.  A gal posted that she made an improvised 'rose nail' out of a strip of aluminum foil.  She folded it to make a thin wick, laid a bit of it on the bottom of the bowl allowing it to stand up above the batter into the air.  She wrote that it worked well for her deep bowl cake.

annebaligod Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 9:56am
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lynsval 

I know folks always talk about the heating cores for large cakes, but I don't like the way the heating core leaves a big hole in the cakes that I have to repair so I use aluminum strips that I fold myself in my larger cakes. I can make as many as I need and it doesn't cost me anything. For a 14 inch cake I would probably use at least 5. Just spray them with cooking spray before using and they slide out easily after you turn your cake over. Put them in the pan before pouring in your batter. The bottom flaps keep them from flipping over.

I know you specifically asked about the 3D pans, but I think you could adapt these strips to those pans. I just keep remembering the old baked potato rods my mother used to use to bake potatoes evenly!!

I haven't tried to reuse them but I don't see why you couldn't. Hope this helps! I also bake at 325 which seems to make a difference as well.

Valerie
LL
 
is this what you're talking about? should i make it as tall as a standard flower nail? or taller because the glass bowl is deeper? has anybody tried this with a glass bowl cake?

PS. i also posted a question in the thread that i got this pic from if there is a reply i shall post it here for further reference.

MBalaska Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 7:27pm
post #17 of 20

Cool!  I don't see why it wouldn't work, especially as you could make it as tall as you needed for the deep bowl. ( I have lots of rose nails for my 2" cake pans) but you never know I may make something different someday, so I'm saving this photo.  Thanks annebaligod.

annebaligod Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 12:18pm
post #18 of 20

your welcome. I'll try to post the results when i try using this in a bowl cake. :lol:

annebaligod Posted 24 Sep 2014 , 1:23am
post #19 of 20

Hi everyone,

 

so i tried the aluminum foil thing and it worked although i wanted the cake's top to be flat but i can just cut it out. It baked perfectly well and even. Although i might have over baked mine a bit hence the cracked top but its fine. Hope this can be helpful.

 

Thanks,

anne

 

MBalaska Posted 24 Sep 2014 , 2:21am
post #20 of 20

@annebaligod It's great that you posted a follow up and with a photo.  Thanks for the info!!;-D

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