ceshell Posted 22 Aug 2007 , 11:11pm
post #1 of

Was it because I used waxed instead of parchment, or because I, um, greased the pan underneath the wax paper?? The waxed PAPER stuck to the stinkin' pan! icon_redface.gif

Anyway at least the other pan didn't stick.

Cake balls, anyone?
LL

67 replies
blmiller84 Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 12:03am
post #2 of

I always use wax paper to line my pans. I usually spray the pan (with PAM) before setting the paper in the pan and I've never had any problems. So... I'm not sure what to tell you!

wgoat5 Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 1:32am
post #3 of

ohhhh YUMMMY oops I can't really tell you why it stuck...but somebody always needs cake balls!!!

lisascakes Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 2:40am
post #4 of

I always line my pans with waxed paper and I only grease the sides. How long did you let the cake cool. Maybe it was left to long before turning it on to the board?

freddyfl Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 2:51am
post #5 of

ummm waxed paper has wax on it. wouldnt it melt and leave a waxy film on your food and pans? I only use parchment......I don't think you are supposed to bake with actual waxed paper, due to its waxiness....... icon_confused.gif

cykrivera Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 2:53am
post #6 of

Not sure why it stuck. When I line my pans with waxed paper (I usually only do it my for super moist cakes like pineappl coconut cake or strawberry cake), I grease the pan before I line it and then after I grease it again and flour it. When I take it out I let it cool for a while, probably 10-15 min. I peel it off with no problem. Good luck and sorry for your loss! icon_cry.gif

redbird Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 2:54am
post #7 of

I've used cheap waxed paper before and had my own mess but other waxed paper worked fine (and I almost always grease beneath the wax paper). Maybe that's the problem? Mine came from Dollar General.

GI Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 3:37am
post #8 of

I baked w/wax paper: spray Pam on bottom,sides of pan, put in the waxed paper on sides & bottom, poured cake batter in, and baked. Came out fine. Cake was really, really moist, too. No waxy peel & I use the cheap Walmart-brand wax paper.

Sorry for your cake. It looks like you over-beat your batter to me. (Sometimes I do that & the cake just falls apart for no reason.)

Exploding Cake Balls.

shebellas Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 3:39am
post #9 of

I ALWAYS spray my pan with Bakers Joy then place wax paper in it and knock wood, I've never had any problems...peals right off...my wilton and culinary instructor both told us to do this...I can only wonder if it was possibly an issue with the temp? Maybe too hot?

gscout73 Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 3:47am

?? I've never used any paper... I went from grease+flour to Bakers Joy and have never looked back. I've even gone searching in the middle of the night for a 24 hour store the one time I let myself run out. icon_cry.gif Now, I keep no less than 2 cans in the kitchen. If I get down to one, the very next time I am at the store I buy 2 more. lol. One local Publix wasn't even going to carry it anymore and I talked the manager into continuing stocking it. icon_wink.gif

It just seems like more work to use both spray and paper?!?!?

donnajf Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 3:54am

Once a pan is greased and wax paper is used to line the pan - u must also grease( & flour ) it before u pour your batter... u can get away with un-greased parchment @ that point thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

JENNSCAKES90909 Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 3:55am

I spray all of my pans my larger square ones I actually line with a paper towel. Doesnt stick and comes off of the cake with ease. Little difficult to remove if you freeze with it on though. With my rounds 10"and smaller I just take a cupcake liner flatten it out and place it in the center. Both of these Ideas came about when I ran out of baking liners to cut them from they worked so well in a pinch that its all I use now.

ceshell Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:00am

Actually you all make a point, before CC I never even used parchment, only wax. So I think the real answer is, I just tapedshut.gif something up LOL. For those of you who use nothing but baker's release or Baker's Joy: God bless your brave souls, I just don't have the guts for that.

Thanks about the tip about overbeating the batter, as it turns out I thought the cake didn't taste that great either, was kind of dense and rubbery, so that prob. entered into the pic. That, maybe leaving it to cool too long, I think that cake was just destined for the trash can.

I rebaked with parchment and was more careful with the mixing too, and they released just fine, though they still way over-crusted (I'm having problems with the WBH recipe, but that's a whole 'nother thread). The THIRD cake I baked today was a different recipe and came out great.

I think the oven in the home we're renting is taunting me, daring me to keep baking cakes. I actually have to sit in front of it and watch the oven thermometer to make sure the oven temp remains consistent. Can you see why I hate to rebake? icon_wink.gif

jibbies Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:00am

gscout73 I'm with you thumbs_up.gif
I've never lined my pans with wax or parchment paper in the 26 years I've been a cake decorator, it just seems like extra work and why do that to ourselves, even when I was a Wilton instructor I told my classes that Wilton recommended it but I personally did not do it.
All you decorators just try the bakers joy or the shortening/flour method and skip that paper step icon_smile.gif

ceshell Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:11am
Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

I've never lined my pans with wax or parchment paper in the 26 years I've been a cake decorator, it just seems like extra work




I totally agree but it's not nearly as much work as rebaking your cake!

LOL!

No seriously I love to hear from those of you who do this, it totally inspires me. One day I'll try...

jibbies Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:25am

ceshell
I almost hate to say this but I have only had to rebake a cake one time and that was because I fell asleep before the timer went off and I slept for about 2 hours and it was a brick, it didn't have anything to do with no paper in the pan, I'm just not sure what happens that a cake has to be rebaked, can you explain? and no, I'm not boasting.

Cakepro Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:38am
Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

gscout73 I'm with you thumbs_up.gif
I've never lined my pans with wax or parchment paper in the 26 years I've been a cake decorator, it just seems like extra work and why do that to ourselves, even when I was a Wilton instructor I told my classes that Wilton recommended it but I personally did not do it.
All you decorators just try the bakers joy or the shortening/flour method and skip that paper step icon_smile.gif




Amen, sister! Heck, I just use spray Pam and be done with it. Except for cheesecakes - and for those I use buttered parchment because I use regular cake pans in a water bath. I hate springform pans!

Using waxed paper for baking just seems so...bizarre. Waxed paper is not made for baking - parchment is!

Weird. icon_confused.gif

ceshell Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:45am
Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

'm just not sure what happens that a cake has to be rebaked, can you explain? and no, I'm not boasting.




Do you mean, why would you ever have to rebake? In this case it's just because I needed a full sized cake, and this layer bit the dust. Also the other layer cooked up really strange, the top and edges were hard. If I cut them off the cake would have been too small, so I just started over.

The rebaked cake seemed ok but one of the layers collapsed in a few spots after cooling. I did test it, it was thoroughly cooked, but it collapsed as though it had soft spots. Corners were hard

I think I just can't get the hang of this recipe, folding in the egg whites does not seem to be going well for me. As I mentioned, my oven issues are not helping.

The third cake was a round cake, would have had to make that one regardless of the unsuccessful first two - the cake I'm trying to bake is a 9" square under a 6" round.

For what it's worth I've never had this much trouble with a cake either!

ceshell Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:53am
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddyfl

ummm waxed paper has wax on it. wouldnt it melt and leave a waxy film on your food and pans? I only use parchment......I don't think you are supposed to bake with actual waxed paper, due to its waxiness....... Confused




Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Using waxed paper for baking just seems so...bizarre. Waxed paper is not made for baking - parchment is!

Weird. icon_confused.gif




You guys are so funny, it never occurred to me that people did not know that waxed paper is also meant for baking! I've used it for years. Although you are most correct in that parchment is better.

Here's a quote from Wikipedia:
"Oven: While wax paper is flammable, it can and is used safely in numerous baking applications. In baking quick breads or cakes, a pan can be lined with wax paper in such a way that the batter completely covers the surface of the wax paper lining. This prevents the bread or cake from sticking to the pan in the lined area, aiding in removal of the baked product."

And something I just read on baking911: "Waxed paper is essentially tissue paper that's been coated with paraffin on both sides, making it supposedly greaseproof and moisture proof. It eventually lets liquids soak through, tears easily, and the wax eventually starts to melt, unless it's completely covered and protected from the heat. For example, waxed paper isn't good for baking cookies because the exposed portions would smoke and char, but it's fine at the bottom of a batter-filled cake or brownie pan."

Ironbaker Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:53am

I sometimes use wax paper also and it's perfectly fine as a replacement for parchment. I don't have to spray/grease before or after I lay it down, usually just the sides.

http://www.answers.com/topic/wax-paper

jibbies Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:59am

ceshell
I'm really sorry you've had so much trouble with your oven, you mentioned that this is a rental house maybe you could get your landlord to replace the element in the oven, sounds like it may have hot/cold spots on it.
I've never had much success with scratch cakes, so I just stick to box mix and add a tablespoon of corn syrup per box and I cut down the water to one cup per box. Hope things work out better for you.

Sarsi Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 5:09am

I ALWAYS use wax paper to line my pans..First I grease with butter then flour, and then lay the wax paper down. After baking, I let them cool for about 10 min. It always peels of just wonderful! And most of the time, All I have to do is just turn the pan upside down and tap it a little bit and out they pop! icon_biggrin.gif

cakemommy Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 5:18am

I always line my pans with wax paper. I use the spray/flour combo and then put wax paper down and then pour the batter right in. I like using wax paper because it helps keep the top of my cake moist until I am ready to ice. Every little bit of help helps!! icon_rolleyes.gif

Parchment will do the same thing right? I actually just bought my first roll ever of parchment paper the other day for making scones and also thought maybe I can use them in my pans as well.


Amy

mjulian Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 5:26am

I am with everyone else I have used waxed paper and PAM and everything was fine. Sorry no help here!

mmo88 Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 5:51am

I don't use any paper at all. I coat my pans with the recipe I got from CC (flour, oil, shortening) and have never had any problems.

Hollyanna70 Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 8:18am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceshell

Quote:
Originally Posted by jibbies

'm just not sure what happens that a cake has to be rebaked, can you explain? and no, I'm not boasting.



Do you mean, why would you ever have to rebake? In this case it's just because I needed a full sized cake, and this layer bit the dust. Also the other layer cooked up really strange, the top and edges were hard. If I cut them off the cake would have been too small, so I just started over.

The rebaked cake seemed ok but one of the layers collapsed in a few spots after cooling. I did test it, it was thoroughly cooked, but it collapsed as though it had soft spots. Corners were hard

I think I just can't get the hang of this recipe, folding in the egg whites does not seem to be going well for me. As I mentioned, my oven issues are not helping.

The third cake was a round cake, would have had to make that one regardless of the unsuccessful first two - the cake I'm trying to bake is a 9" square under a 6" round.

For what it's worth I've never had this much trouble with a cake either!




I was having similar problems, since moving into this house. Some cakes would stick, some wouldn't, some would bake up too high, some wouldn't. It was never ending. I had never ever had a problem with cakes sticking, when I baked in my old house. I had always used pam + flour, or baker's joy. I've baked about 10 cakes in the last 3 days and not one of them has stuck. However! The first day my first cake turned out horribly.. I figured out why. My oven gets WAY too hot!

I went out and bought a thermometer specifically for ovens. I turned the oven on 300 degrees, and when it hit that mark, the thermometer read 351 (I checked it several times to see if it was steady or fluctuates, it was always 51 degrees hotter than it was supposed to be, no matter what temperature I set it on). So, every time after that first cake, I have baked my cakes at 275. Not one cake has stuck. They've all come out perfectly, and I've only used baker's joy in the pan.

Seriously, check your temperature. You might have to have someone come out and fix it for you, but for now, you can just bake at a lower temperature, and see if that helps.

Also, I have a baking stone on the bottom shelf, to regulate the heat, but I have had that there since I moved in 4 years ago. I knew there was an issue with the oven, and have always baked at a slightly lower temperature, but I had NO idea it was that bad. This is the first time I've had to bake a large cake in it, though. The little cakes weren't too bad. I guess because they cook faster, so they didn't have time to burn. All this time I thought it was my pans I had just bought. haha

I wish you the best of luck. If you're renting, the landlord should fix your oven for you, but until then, just lower the temperature by about 50 degrees, and see if that helps. icon_wink.gif


Hope this helps,

Holly

ceshell Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:12pm

Thanks Holly! I really like your baking stone idea, I think I have one and may try it for the next cake. I do indeed have an oven thermometer and the oven is definitely not consistent in the way it heats. Sometimes it stops at the correct temperature, sometimes it just keeps going. The first cake I destroyed 2 months ago, I ran out and got the thermometer and discovered it was running 75 degrees too hot! icon_eek.gif But when I turned the temp down by 75 degrees, sometimes the oven just stayed at the "adjusted" temp (like 275). Clearly its internal thermostat is confused.

I do need to get the thing fixed. It's a 1960's antique Wedgewood stove, so no wonder I'm having issues. I thought I could overcome it by watching it as my cakes baked but clearly this is not working!

Hey, I like this idea - maybe it's not ME after all!! Who knows maybe I'll even try the wax paper again icon_wink.gif

aswartzw Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:24pm

When I baked cakes with my great-grandma (years ago) she would also grease the bottom of the pan, put the pre-cut piece of waxed paper in the pan, rubbed it thoroughly on the bottom pan and then flipped the waxed paper over. This way both sides of the waxed paper is coated in grease. Not once in all her years of baking did she ever have problems with this.

darandon Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:27pm

I"ve never lined any of my pans with wax paper or parchment. I only use the homemade cake release and I've never had any problems. I too think it is an extra step to line them.

BoothsBest Posted 23 Aug 2007 , 4:52pm

I have never used waxed paper or parchment. I only lightly spray with generic Pam. I have baked 100s of cakes and have only had one stick. It was an Italian cream, very moist. It wasn't that bad and I was able to repair it.

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