Kiddiekakes Posted 11 Jul 2005 , 1:21pm
post #1 of

I have used both for flooding in cookies but I am wondering what the difference is...I like the smooth matte finish that Royal leaves and it dries really quickly.I had some colorflow powder the other day as I had no meringue powder left so I made colorflow icing but it was really loose and took forever to dry and I really didn't see a big difference....Des anyone know the difference in the two??

17 replies
Bubbles Posted 11 Jul 2005 , 1:34pm
post #2 of

Color Flo takes a few days to completly dry. I use it to put different charaters on cakes. It has more of a shiny finish to it, and it dries like a hard piece of candy. I have at least one photo of a cake out there with a color flo design. It has an alligator on it. I don't know if that completly answered your question or not.

MariaLovesCakes Posted 11 Jul 2005 , 1:55pm
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddiekakes

I have used both for flooding in cookies but I am wondering what the difference is...I like the smooth matte finish that Royal leaves and it dries really quickly.I had some colorflow powder the other day as I had no meringue powder left so I made colorflow icing but it was really loose and took forever to dry and I really didn't see a big difference....Des anyone know the difference in the two??




Well, to tell you the truth, I don't even bother using colorflow anymore.

Its cheaper to do Royal icing and if you thin it, you can do the same fillings as you do with Color Flow.

I have done a lot of my characters with Royal icing. It dries faster too.

I don't even do the buttercream transfer. I do everything in Royal Icing and get same details....

You can see in my photos the stand up characters and also Scooby Doo Cake where I used Royal Icing...

Kiddiekakes Posted 11 Jul 2005 , 2:00pm
post #4 of

Hi Maria,

I use royal all the time too.... was wondering what others did.I don't do BCT but I use royal to make the transfers and I like it better!!

MariaLovesCakes Posted 11 Jul 2005 , 2:23pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddiekakes

Hi Maria,

I use royal all the time too.... was wondering what others did.I don't do BCT but I use royal to make the transfers and I like it better!!




Yep, me too. I think BCT are a bit more work than I want to get myself into. Since Royal Icing works for me, why bother with that, right?

tcturtleshell Posted 11 Jul 2005 , 9:44pm
post #6 of

I agree w/ you two. I like doing BCT but it takes less time to do color flow or royal. Plus if you mess up on BCT you have to start all over again... I hate doing that! There are a lot of steps to take! It's easier to trace out all your transfers & fill them in w/ royal or color flow. I like both of them. I don't have a favorite.

KiddieKakes & Maria, your cakes are so pretty!! Ya'll both do a wonderful job!!!

MariaLovesCakes Posted 11 Jul 2005 , 11:08pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcturtleshell

I agree w/ you two. I like doing BCT but it takes less time to do color flow or royal. Plus if you mess up on BCT you have to start all over again... I hate doing that! There are a lot of steps to take! It's easier to trace out all your transfers & fill them in w/ royal or color flow. I like both of them. I don't have a favorite.

KiddieKakes & Maria, your cakes are so pretty!! Ya'll both do a wonderful job!!!




Thank you, tcturtleshell! icon_smile.gif

tcturtleshell Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 2:06am
post #8 of

You're very welcome Maria!

Kiddiekakes Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 2:15am
post #9 of

Thanks Turtle!! icon_smile.gif

Newbie Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 3:16am

But what is the difference?

Cake_Princess Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 4:53am

I recall looking at my aunt's old cake decorating books from England. They basically use royal icing to do the floodwork. I suspect the difference is, Wilton found a way to make more money an came up with this Color FLow thing. I would nor be surprised if it's nothing more than the ready mixed royal icing.


Princess

MariaLovesCakes Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 12:28pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cake_Princess

I recall looking at my aunt's old cake decorating books from England. They basically use royal icing to do the floodwork. I suspect the difference is, Wilton found a way to make more money an came up with this Color FLow thing. I would nor be surprised if it's nothing more than the ready mixed royal icing.


Princess




Yep, Cake Princess! Color Flow is expensive! I buy products like Meringue Powder from CK Products at my local Wholesale store... Its cheaper and I can buy them by the bag...

Wilton products can get expensive... If I buy anything from them, I try to have coupons, otherwise, it can wait!!! icon_lol.gif

MariaLovesCakes Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 12:29pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie

But what is the difference?




I am gong to ask Wilton on their forum and I will let you know. But, personally, I don't think there is any difference. icon_cool.gif

Kiddiekakes Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 1:45pm

Maria....Good luck getting Wilton to answer you!!!Ha!Ha!

MariaLovesCakes Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 2:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddiekakes

Maria....Good luck getting Wilton to answer you!!!Ha!Ha!




oh, really? Wow, so you've tried asking them before?? icon_lol.gif

tcturtleshell Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 2:35pm

Your welcome KiddieKakes!!

Kiddiekakes Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 3:46pm

Yeah sometimes when you have an inquiry about a product that is sort of a "Why" they tend to hum and Haw

aunt-judy Posted 12 Jul 2005 , 5:17pm

i've never used color flow from a mix; only every used royal icing (of varying consistencies) for the outline and fill-in of flooding decorations on cookies, etc.

ha! icon_eek.gif i just googled "wilton color flow ingredients" and the fantes.com website lists the ingredients as "dried egg whites, sodium lauryl sulfate", so basically you're paying a whole lot for meringue powder and a foaming agent that you also find in shampoo and facial cleanser, and which many people avoid because of its irritant qualities...read more from the tom's of maine site:
What is it?
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) is a foaming agent naturally derived from coconut oil. SLS has a long history of safe use in a variety of consumer personal care products.
What does it do?
We use SLS in our toothpaste and shampoo because of its superior foaming and lathering properties. In our toothpaste, SLS enables proper dispersion of the ingredients, as well as easy rinsing. In our shampoo, SLS provides a pleasant lather and thorough rinsing abilities


...hmmm, i wonder what its purpose in color flow is? icon_confused.gif
p.s. i couldn't find an ingredient list on the wilton site for any of their products...which i find alarming, given the number of food allergies prevalent in children.

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