Royal Icing On Fondant

Decorating By didi5 Updated 15 Feb 2015 , 7:44pm by Linda2010

didi5 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 2:03am
post #1 of 16

I'm making a wedding cake this weekend that is covered in fondant and would have royal icing swirly details on it. I need to have it refrigerated as much as possible because I use IMBC. I was planning on covering the cake with fondant, then pipe on the royal icing details then refrigerate the cake. Now I'm afraid that when I take out the cake out of the fridge that the condensation will melt away the royal icing. Any words of wisdom will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

15 replies
jenny518 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 2:44am
post #2 of 16

I am no expert on this, but I believe that your royal icing will soften up too much in the fridge. I wouldn't chance it.

Suzy40 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 3:01am
post #3 of 16

Hi

I have owned a business for 15 years and I would not put royal icing in the fridge , at all , it will definitely change it and when the cake is coming back to room temperature I am sure it will run etc

what is IMBC , why cant you keep it out of the fridge

didi5 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 4:44am
post #4 of 16

IMBC is Italian Meringue Buttercream. It's made of eggwhites, all butter and sugar. I mean I could leave it outside for up to 8 hours but I wouldn't take a chance for it overnight. I would rather wait until the reception for it to keep out of the fridge for a longer period of time.

Yikes! What did I get myself into?! I guess I'll use gumpaste or fondant to make the details. It would take longer than piping it. arghh!

Gefion Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 7:50am
post #5 of 16

I use royal icing in ecessive when making lambeth designs and my cakes are always in the fridge.
It does not go soft at all in the fridge. Let it dry first - it dries very very hard. I'm more worried about keeping it outside the fridge if it's humid.

Alligande Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 10:40am
post #6 of 16

all my cakes are refridgerated because of fillings and IMBC and I use royal icing details, for lettering etc, I have not had any type of problem, I also live in humid region and that also seems to work. I am talking from the time of delivery to cutting I would guess 4-5 hours

didi5 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 1:07pm
post #7 of 16

thanks for your replies. I think I'm going to practice on some extra cake that I have. I would really like to use RI because it would be so much faster than gumpaste. We'll see what happens.

TC123 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 1:47pm
post #8 of 16

Hmmm... I see some mixed reactions here... Very interesting.

In my experience, whenever I put royal icing in the frig it breaks down on me. It gets soft (mushy, the longer it stays in) and the colors run.

I wonder if it has to do with the royal icing recipe. The one I use most of the time has meringue powder in it.

Good luck! icon_smile.gif

Gefion Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 5:11pm
post #9 of 16

I better clarify - my royal icing recipe seems to be different from the ones used in the States icon_biggrin.gif I use fresh eggwhite with powdered sugar and a bit of acid, usually lemon juice. I just stir it with a big spoon. You can use pasterurized whites if you don't have organic salmonella free eggs available.

1 white
1 ½ cup powdered sugar (apprx... add little at a time, it can vary)
1 tsp lemon juice

Leave the eggs out for 24 hours, it will do chemical stuff to it, something with albumen I belive. Makes it better for piping.

This royal does dry very very hard though. Not good for glaze.

jeking Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 5:20pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gefion

I better clarify - my royal icing recipe seems to be different from the ones used in the States icon_biggrin.gif I use fresh eggwhite with powdered sugar and a bit of acid, usually lemon juice. I just stir it with a big spoon. You can use pasterurized whites if you don't have organic salmonella free eggs available.

1 white
1 ½ cup powdered sugar (apprx... add little at a time, it can vary)
1 tsp lemon juice

Leave the eggs out for 24 hours, it will do chemical stuff to it, something with albumen I belive. Makes it better for piping.

This royal does dry very very hard though. Not good for glaze.





Not intending to hijack the post, but are you saying that you don't use a mixer to make the RI??

sewlora Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 5:26pm
post #11 of 16

Is the royal icing breaking down in the fridge because it is refrigerated, or because it is in contact with moisture (ie: buttercream)?

didi5 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 5:26pm
post #12 of 16

Thanks Gefion for sharing your recipe. I will try it tonight using pasteurized eggwhites. HOpe it works for me!

barbydoll8 Posted 8 Aug 2007 , 5:28pm
post #13 of 16

I use Wilton's royal icing recipe and put cakes in the fridge all the time. I live in FL so if it's humid, it's here and I have never had royal go mushy or run in any form. I do let the icing harden rock hard before I put the cake away though.

My instructor who has 20 years of owning bakeries does this too. She doesn't have a problem.

Let us know how your practice cakes come out. I'd love to know if I'm just fortunate.

Suzy40 Posted 9 Aug 2007 , 11:28am
post #14 of 16

Ok I decided to give it another go and put some royal icing onto fondant icing and stuck it in the fridge , and yep , it went to hell in a handbasket when it was coming back to room temperature

and its not humid and a lovely day , hmmmmmmm

maybe its to do with the difference in products , but my royal icing was rock hard and now isnt and has a different look to it
sort of see through

hmmmmm

strange isnt it
Suzy

snowshoe1 Posted 9 Aug 2007 , 3:34pm
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzy40

Ok I decided to give it another go and put some royal icing onto fondant icing and stuck it in the fridge , and yep , it went to hell in a handbasket when it was coming back to room temperature

and its not humid and a lovely day , hmmmmmmm

maybe its to do with the difference in products , but my royal icing was rock hard and now isnt and has a different look to it
sort of see through

hmmmmm

strange isnt it
Suzy




Interesting because I followed this post yesterday and did a small test last night. My results were the same as yours (all goopy after an hour). Also I colored some the RI and it bled. Would love to know what the trick is or why people get different results.

Linda2010 Posted 15 Feb 2015 , 7:44pm
post #16 of 16

Stop, please!!!

 

All the decorations based in sugar are suceptible to melt with the humidity caused by the condensation that is created when there are sudden changes of temperature from cold to warm (outside of the refrigerator)   There are places that are dry or places that are humid, therefore you can´t generalize a rule.  Few degrees in the temperature can make a big diference.

 

So please, do not do it.  

 

Do you want to do it in a safe way?  place your cake in a plastic bag, make sure there is no air coming in or out.  Refrigerate it and when you need to take it our of the refrigerator, do not take it out of the bag untill you feel that the fondant does not feel cold anymore.  Figure at least a couple of hours.  

 

There will be no condensation that will melt your decorations

 

I live in a very humid place, and I have done it a number of times without any problem.

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