Fondant Over Cold Cake?

Decorating By danar217 Updated 11 Dec 2008 , 9:52pm by ShopGrl1128

danar217 Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 2:14am
post #1 of 18

I am doing my first fondant wedding cake. I plan on baking in advance and freezing. Do I need to let the cakes come to room temp. before covering with marshmallow fondant?? It's going to be all white so I'm not worried about colors bleeding or anything like that. Can I cover them with the fondant while frozen or at least cold?

17 replies
lisasweeta Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 2:22am
post #2 of 18

I always cover my cakes when they are cold. I get sharper edges on my fondant that way. icon_biggrin.gif

summernoelle Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 2:23am
post #3 of 18

Yes! Do it when cold! The cakes are stiffer, and easier to smooth the fondant onto. Just be prepared for a little condensation-don't touch it until it has completely dried.

OhMyGanache Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 2:24am
post #4 of 18

I prefer to put fondant on frozen cake... so much easier.

sbcakes Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 2:26am
post #5 of 18

I wouldn't cover a cake while it is frozen. I did that once and the fondant started to melt. What happens, as the cake defrosts, the fondant "sweats" or condenses. I would suggest allowing it to thaw before you lay the fondant on.

sweet_as_tisse Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 2:39am
post #6 of 18

i say yes, cover them while at least half frozen, its the only way i do it.

i only ever work with my cakes when they are either frozen or very cold, you have a firm surface to work on, if you ice with BC when the cake is really cold it firms it up quickly if you need to smooth it out more just use a hot knife. the smoother your cake is before putting on fondant the easier it is to get no lumps and bumps, the coldness of the cake and BC firms up the fondant allowing you to get nice edges etc.

just my experience anyway!!

cheers

kylie

miriel Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 3:01am
post #7 of 18

I chill BC covered cakes before applying the fondant. With a firmer cake (slightly chilled, not frozen), it makes the job easier.

cupcake Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 3:19am
post #8 of 18

Yes it is easier to put on while the cake is cold, the only problem I have had is after the covered cake has completely thawed that condensation sometimes creates air pockets that look like large bubbles, the fondant has to be pricked with a pin to release the air, this has happened on B/C cakes as well.

cupcake Posted 30 Jul 2007 , 3:20am
post #9 of 18

Yes it is easier to put on while the cake is cold, the only problem I have had is after the covered cake has completely thawed that condensation sometimes creates air pockets that look like large bubbles, the fondant has to be pricked with a pin to release the air, this has happened on B/C cakes as well.

CakeMakar Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 1:34am
post #10 of 18

Wow, never knew this, thanks for asking. This may help my smoothness.

I've been hinting like a madman that I want Sugarshack's fondant DVD for Christmas.

sugarshack Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 4:49am
post #11 of 18

for me, covering frozen, or too cold cakes causes a mess of trouble.

i flash freeze for 5-7 minutes only, then cover. that gives me a hard enough icing to get sharp edges and smooth sides, but it does not cause so much condensation as to cause any problems.

HTH!

say_it_with_cake Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 5:27am
post #12 of 18

If you live in a high humidity area then definitely avoid covering it frozen! The one and only time I tried this, the mmf almost completely disintegrated!! The whole lot literally turned to liquid and fairly well ran off the cake - there was nothing else I could do but scrape it off and start again icon_sad.gif

I now do as sugarshack suggests and chill for a few minutes icon_wink.gif

Frankyola Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 7:56pm
post #13 of 18

I am sooo scare icon_cry.gificon_cry.gif I have to make my first Topsy Turvy and I don't know if cover it when my cake is frozen or just cold I am using Micheles Foster fondant I don't know what to do, icon_redface.gificon_redface.gif this cake is for my nice and I would like to give it to her as a present. I am sorry I just want to vent. icon_cry.gif

muddpuppy Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 8:06pm
post #14 of 18

I love these topics.. just like the fondant in the fridge discussion.. lol... I like to chill my crumb coated cakes for about ten minutes, then bc, then chill for a few minutes, like 5, then fondant... Never completely chilled...and then directly into a cake box to try to fight any condensation...

muddpuppy Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 8:07pm
post #15 of 18

I love these topics.. just like the fondant in the fridge discussion.. lol... I like to chill my crumb coated cakes for about ten minutes, then bc, then chill for a few minutes, like 5, then fondant... Never completely chilled...and then directly into a cake box to try to fight any condensation...

muddpuppy Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 8:08pm
post #16 of 18

I love these topics.. just like the fondant in the fridge discussion.. lol... I like to chill my crumb coated cakes for about ten minutes, then bc, then chill for a few minutes, like 5, then fondant... Never completely chilled...and then directly into a cake box to try to fight any condensation...

muddpuppy Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 8:09pm
post #17 of 18

oops... double post.. sorry icon_smile.gif

ShopGrl1128 Posted 11 Dec 2008 , 9:52pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarshack

for me, covering frozen, or too cold cakes causes a mess of trouble.

i flash freeze for 5-7 minutes only, then cover. that gives me a hard enough icing to get sharp edges and smooth sides, but it does not cause so much condensation as to cause any problems.

HTH!




This exactly what I do with all my cakes...I got your three DVDs icon_wink.gif

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