AgentCakeBaker Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 4:56pm
post #1 of

Do many of you make cheesecakes in addition to decorated cakes and cookies? I was thinking of testing some cheesecake recipes from this book that I have, can't remember the name off hand. Anyway I figure this will be a great way to boost my customer base. People are really into cheesecakes these days and I've seen what some companies charge for them. Hint, Hint...The Cheesecake Factory. I figure that if I start offering cheesecakes then maybe I'll get more customers. I usually only get about 3-4 orders a month. Call me greedy but I want at least 3-5 a week. icon_cry.gificon_twisted.gif

Anyway, I'm always looking for ways to gain extra clients. Would you buy a delicious cheesecake? If so, what would you pay for it?

49 replies
tthardy78 Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 7:48pm
post #2 of

I make cheesecakes as well as cakes. I charge $19 for a 9" cheesecake.

prettycake Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 7:53pm
post #3 of

I make Cheesecake Pops (on a stick) for special occasions. Then dip them in chocolate and decorate each one differently. Tie a small ribbon at the end of each stick. Like these..
It's very easy. icon_smile.gif
LL

missnnaction Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:03pm
post #4 of

prettycake... I saw this on foodnetwork.. How do you get the balls so round and hard enough to stay on the stick. Do you use a mold...i was wondering if the round lollipop mold for hard candy could be used.

cowgirl58 Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:06pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by prettycake

I make Cheesecake Pops (on a stick) for special occasions. Then dip them in chocolate and decorate each one differently. Tie a small ribbon at the end of each stick. Like these..
It's very easy. icon_smile.gif




How do you make the cheesecakes round and to stay on the stick??

Phoov Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:06pm
post #6 of

I'd pay 25 easily~ and the most delicious wedding cake I've ever eaten was Cheesecakes surrounded by wonderful topping choices. It was as elegant as any wedding cake I've seen, and to die for tastewise!

Haven't researched making these yet.

Momof4luvscakes Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:09pm
post #7 of

I make cheesecakes also. I charge $20.00 for a 9" plain or with strawberries. My specialty one go for more. If you need some recipes, pm me and I can send you some.

magentaa23 Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:18pm
post #8 of

i have done wedding cakes with cheesecake and raspberry preserve filling.. its wonderful

prettycake Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:49pm
post #9 of

I usually use the unbaked Cheesecake(the kind you do not bake, but chill only). Make it the usual way. Chill it until it is set in a pan or bowl, it really does not matter . Then when it is firm and set, use a Melon Baller OR a cookie scoop.. quickly with your hands, shape it into a perfect ball. Put the stick (candy stick-white), carefully roll it around on graham cracker crust that is loose. Put on cookie sheet line w/ parchment standing up, stick pointing up.
Then freeze until very cold and firm..then dip in chocolate. The chocolate will be like a "shell", so even if cheese cake get soft inside, it will not leak.
Then you can decorate each one the way you like it. I'm sure baked Cheese cake will do. But I would not put crust under it if your gonna make them into Cheese cake pops.
icon_smile.gif

RisqueBusiness Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:56pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by prettycake

I usually use the unbaked Cheesecake. Make it the usual way. Chill it until it is set in a pan or bowl, it really does not matter . Then when it is firm and set, use a Melon Baller OR a cookie scoop.. quickly with your hands, shape it into a perfect ball. Put the stick (candy stick-white), carefully roll it around on graham cracker crust that is loose. Put on cookie sheet line w/ parchment standing up, stick pointing up.
Then freeze until very cold and firm..then dip in chocolate. The chocolate will be like a "shell", so even if cheese cake get soft inside, it will not leak.
Then you can decorate each one the way you like it. I'm sure baked Cheese cake will do. But I would not put crust under it if your gonna make them into Cheese cake pops.
icon_smile.gif




you don't bake them at all? can any cheese cake recipe do or do you have a ' special' one?

Thanks!

Phoov Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 8:57pm

Magenta! Are any of your cheesecakes posted in your photos????

prettycake Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 9:01pm

You shape them into balls after they are baked. But for the unbaked (chill only) recipe, you shape them once they have set. yes, any recipe will do. As long as it is firm enough to shape into balls, which is just like cutting them into wedges.. They have to be firm enough also to cut. icon_smile.gif

magentaa23 Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 9:02pm

i use the cheesecake as a filling in cakes... one without a crust of course... i use 2 layer cakes and the middle layer is cheesecake, about the same height as the cakes... its firm enough that you do not need a gasket of buttercream to keeo it from oozing out of the cake... the wedding cake on my second page in my photos with all the bows was cheesecake filled

KatieTaylor77 Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 9:06pm

I made an incredible pumpkin cheesecake last year for Thanksgiving . . . it was gone in less than 5 minutes! My family raves about it because it was lighter than a traditional pumpkin pie but so delicious . . . PM me if you want the recipe. . . I think I got it out of one of my Better Homes cook books . . .

zina Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 9:32pm

Hi all. I've only gotten one order for a cheesecake so far and unfortunately I had to turn the customer down because I have never made a cheesecake before. Fortunately for me there is a lady here in Virginia that has retired from making cheesecakes and cheesecake truffles and she is offering classes on how to make them. I took the cheesecake truffle class last year and now I am looking forward to making the cheesecakes. She will also be offering a class on cheesecakes for wedding cakes and I am looking forward to taking that class as well. It may be a little while before I can take the class but once I do I will be happy to share.

Happy baking.
Z icon_biggrin.gif

missnnaction Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 9:41pm

zina...Cheesecake truffles... How would you go about making these...

SweetConfectionsChef Posted 13 Sep 2006 , 10:00pm

I sell cheesecakes in my bakery. $31.99 for a thick (about 3") 10" cheesecake. I have 18 different flavors but the actual cheesecake part is always the same recipe. I sell about 10 a month except during the Christmas season when I sell more of everything.

AgentCakeBaker Posted 16 Sep 2006 , 11:40pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetConfectionsChef

I sell cheesecakes in my bakery. $31.99 for a thick (about 3") 10" cheesecake. I have 18 different flavors but the actual cheesecake part is always the same recipe. I sell about 10 a month except during the Christmas season when I sell more of everything.




Wow...10 cheesecakes a month. That's very good. Ok, now I'm definitely ready to experiment with cheesecakes.

MrsMissey Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 12:59am
Quote:
Originally Posted by zina

Hi all. I've only gotten one order for a cheesecake so far and unfortunately I had to turn the customer down because I have never made a cheesecake before. Fortunately for me there is a lady here in Virginia that has retired from making cheesecakes and cheesecake truffles and she is offering classes on how to make them. I took the cheesecake truffle class last year and now I am looking forward to making the cheesecakes. She will also be offering a class on cheesecakes for wedding cakes and I am looking forward to taking that class as well. It may be a little while before I can take the class but once I do I will be happy to share.

Happy baking.
Z icon_biggrin.gif




..this sounds very interesting! Can you give me any more info on this? I am not too far from Fred'brg!

I sell quite a few cheesecakes to our local restaurants but not too many of my individual customers order them.

Chef_Stef Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 1:05am

I've only done one wedding cheesecake with a different flavor in each tier, and I charge $3.50 a serving for those. She immediately ordered an 8" round for the following weekend; I charged her $25.00 for that.

I have a bride coming tomorrow to taste my raspberry swirl cheesecake as part of a wedding combo, so maybe that will be something I'll do more of in the future...

I use the basic non-waterbath method cheesecake recipe in the Joy of Cooking because the waterbath method in Rose Levy Berenbaum's book leaves it wonderful but a bit too custard-y, which to some might seem underdone, so I go with a drier finished cake.

getfrosted Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 1:22am

I offer cheesecakes as well ... 14 flavours and I charge $40 for a 9" that is about 3" thick. I offer 4" as well for $15. Lots of orders, especially for Thanksgiving and Christmas. Sometimes I make a couple extras in down time of my most popular flavours and freeze them - cheating - maybe. But they freeze wonderfully!

I can't believe that some of you are charging so little! They are expensive to make! Most of my recipes use 32 oz. of cream cheese, sour cream and all the flavourings ....

They are very easy and I love doing them because it takes 1/2 hour for a basic one and I love having profit from jobs I do. The ones with fruit, dipped strawberries and liquor in them cost more.

heavenlys Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 1:38am

we sell cheesecake @ Heavenly's and ours start @ $20.00 for a 9" plain and go up form there depending on the flavors. We offer around 30 flavors but definately have more popular ones. We average about 40 cheesecakes a month and sometimes more when we do a wedding or a special event.
Here is a pic of a fundraiser our town called the taste of the greenbelt and every year area restuarants bring samples of their food and the Lion's Club sells tickets. It's a great way to advertise because your only cost is your product and people get hands on experience with your product
LL

knoxcop1 Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 1:43am

Cheesecakes are the biggest part of my business. For a 9 inch, I charge $35. For the 6 inch, I charge $17.

Around the holidays, the bookings go up. I usually do about 4 or more a week.

I do any flavor they can come up with, and have a sour cream topping that's kind of a mystery!

--Knox--

AgentCakeBaker Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 1:47am

Ok, now I'm really going to get into this soon. I wish I would have stocked up on Philadelphia Cream Cheese at Kroger this week. It was on sale for $.99 each. Darn.

SweetConfectionsChef Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 2:08am

You can get 48oz block of cream cheese from Sam's Club for less than $6 and it's much easier to work with! You don't have to open all those little packages! I got my recipe from Southern Living years ago and modified it to my liking. For me, it took a while to get it to stop cracking...I kept trying all the water baths and opening the oven door after it was finished...all of these crazy things mean nothing because you have to start with a GOOD recipe! Good luck to your new adventure!

bonton Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 2:10am

magentaa23

I'm curious about how you use cheesecake as a filling for a cake. I take it you bake a regular cheesecake minus the crust. do you then break it up or make the cheesecake a size to fit in between the layers? How do you get the cheesecake out the pan, flipped onto the cake? If you don't mind, will you share the technique. Thanks
[/quote]

heychele Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 2:30am

I found this recipe for cheesecake bonbons although I think I would use my own cheesecake recipe. Just personal preference.




Cheesecake Bon Bons
Source: Kraft Foods

1 (11.1 ounce) package JELL-O No Bake Real Cheesecake
1 cup cold milk
30 lollipop sticks
1 (7 ounce) container BAKER'S Real Dark Semi-Sweet
Dipping Chocolate
Decorations, such as assorted sprinkles, colored sugars,
chopped PLANTERS Nuts (optional)

Beat cheesecake filling mix and milk with electric mixer on low speed just until moistened. Beat on medium speed 3 minutes. (Filling will be thick.) Stir in 1 cup of the crust mix. Place remaining crust mix in resealable plastic bag; reserve for later use.

Pour filling mixture into large bowl; cover. Refrigerate 1 hour.

Roll filling mixture into 30 balls with moistened hands, using about 1 tablespoon of the filling mixture for each ball. Place in single layer on wax paper-covered baking sheet. Insert lollipop stick into center of each ball. Freeze 2 hours.

Melt dipping chocolate as directed on package. Dip frozen pops into chocolate, turning to coat completely and scraping off excess chocolate on side of container. Immediately dip balls into reserved crust mix and/or desired decorations. Freeze an additional 2 hours or until chocolate is set.

More candy recipes...



off of the recipe gold mine site

cakesbyjess Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 2:44am

I use Rose Levy Berenbaum's wedding cake cheesecake recipe in the Cake Bible, and I ice the cheesecakes with her white chocolate cream cheese icing. The cheesecake is crustless and it bakes in a water bath. The great thing about this recipe is that you can bake it in any size/shape pan. So, I do round, square, and sheet cheesecakes. My customers love them. The ingredients are expensive, so I charge a lot more for my cheesecakes than my regular cakes. I actually think that cheesecakes are easier and they are definitely more profitable than regular cakes. icon_smile.gif

AgentCakeBaker Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 3:48pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesbyjess

I use Rose Levy Berenbaum's wedding cake cheesecake recipe in the Cake Bible, and I ice the cheesecakes with her white chocolate cream cheese icing. The cheesecake is crustless and it bakes in a water bath. The great thing about this recipe is that you can bake it in any size/shape pan. So, I do round, square, and sheet cheesecakes. My customers love them. The ingredients are expensive, so I charge a lot more for my cheesecakes than my regular cakes. I actually think that cheesecakes are easier and they are definitely more profitable than regular cakes. icon_smile.gif




What is a water bath? I'm new to cheesecakes so I'm not quite familiar with all the techniques around cheesecakes.

heavenlys, those cheesecakes look delicious. I want to taste a slice. icon_lol.gif

Chef_Stef Posted 17 Sep 2006 , 3:52pm

Water bath just means you wrap tin foil (VERY well) around the springform pan to prevent water seeping in, and then you bake the cheesecake in the springform set in a large roasting pan with about an inch or more of hot water in the roaster. It makes a very creamy cheesecake.

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