MamaBerry Posted 22 Jun 2007 , 6:11am
post #1 of

Holy Moly! I just need to share this!

My white cakes have had the texture of a carrot cake icon_cry.gif until I discovered Softasilk by Pillsbury. Yipee! icon_biggrin.gif My white cake turned out as yummy as the Ron Ben-Israel cake I had when I attended his workshop! thumbs_up.gif

My clients are gonna love this! icon_eek.gificon_smile.gif

35 replies
Julisa Posted 22 Jun 2007 , 6:17am
post #2 of

Ok. what is Softasilk? Are you making your cakes from a mix or scratch?

MamaBerry Posted 22 Jun 2007 , 6:30am
post #3 of

I make everything from scratch. I've tried doctoring from organic box mixes but it wasn't the "right" kind of texture I was looking for. Softasilk is just cake flour but the correct kidn of cake flour.

I've looked and tried all types of "cake flour" only to find that it really didn't give me the texture it was supposed to that only cake flour gives.

In baking text books there's a whole chapter dedicated to the different types of flour and what makes them different and why you cannot use one for all things.

Julisa Posted 25 Jun 2007 , 3:37pm
post #4 of

Wow. I am impressed that you make everything from scratch. I have been having the hardest time finding a white cake reciepe from scratch. All the people I do cakes for love the duncan hines frech vanilla mix. But I have been having trouble with the mix here lately. It doesn't rise or doesn't cook completely in the center with out burning the edges...blah, blah, blah...
I have serched the world wide web and have yet to find a french vanilla recepie.

steplite Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 12:42am
post #5 of

I have always baked from scratch. I used to use Swans down cake flour until I tried Softassilk. It is a BIG diference in the taste and texture of cakes. It's a much softer crumb. Even If a recipe called for AP flour I still use softassilk and add two T per cup. I can't see Baking a cake without it. It is the best.

melysa Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 1:13am
post #6 of

i agree, it really makes the difference.

peacockplace Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 1:09pm
post #7 of

Where do you find it? Walmart doesn't carry it?

steplite Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 2:17pm
post #8 of

You can find it at the Super Walmarts. They also carry Watkin's Vanilla.

peacockplace Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 2:42pm
post #9 of

They don't carry it at my super walmart icon_cry.gif Maybe publix?

steplite Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 3:00pm

Softasssilk Cake flour is made By Pillsbury.The number on my box is 1-800-767-4466. For questions or comments. The e-mail is Pillsburybaking.com. Hope this Helps.

Julisa Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 3:37pm

Does anyone have any comments about Wondra Flour? Emril mentioned it was a very good flour. I have never tried it for baking. Was just wondering.

JanH Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 6:18pm

Wondra (a low protein pre-gelatinized flour) is most often used to thicken sauces and gravy because it dissolves quickly in hot or cold liquids.

Here's an overview of most flours, and how they differ by application (cake flour, AP flour, etc.):

http://www.ochef.com/21.htm

Above also includes British and non-American names for flour. icon_smile.gif

Choosing flour for baking:
(An article that has photos of most major brand flour products.)

http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/articles/choosing-flour-for-baking.aspx

HTH

steplite Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 7:40pm

For those of you who can't find Softassilk cake flour, White Lily AP flour which is also owned by pillsbury, is the next best thing. It makes a very soft crumb cake too.

Katskakes Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 7:58pm

has anyone used this for a chocolate cake?
how is it? i believe i have some at home, i either got it at the grocery store or at the local cake shop. i can't remember. I do know the local shop carries Swans.

playingwithsugar Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 8:01pm

Softasilk is on the top shelf of the Super Wal-Mart stores, right above regular flour. It is in a box, and is almost always found right next to the tubes of Wondra flour.

I have been using cake flour ever since I found a wholesale source for it. It definitely makes a difference, even in brownies. And pastry flour is now all I use for cookie baking.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

3littleangels Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 8:21pm

[Holy Moly! I just need to share this!

My white cakes have had the texture of a carrot cake until I discovered Softasilk by Pillsbury. Yipee! My white cake turned out as yummy as the Ron Ben-Israel cake I had when I attended his workshop!

My clients are gonna love this! ]

MamaBerry, can you (or anyone) tell me if the Swanson brand is as good as the Pillsbury brand?[/quote]

melysa Posted 26 Jun 2007 , 8:31pm

katskakes, YES! it is awesome in chocolate cake (find a good recipe with cake flour, butter, good cocoa, and BUTTERMILK and you will have an amazing cake!)

JanH Posted 27 Jun 2007 , 1:49am

I've used both with good results. icon_smile.gif

Julisa Posted 27 Jun 2007 , 6:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Wondra (a low protein pre-gelatinized flour) is most often used to thicken sauces and gravy because it dissolves quickly in hot or cold liquids.

Here's an overview of most flours, and how they differ by application (cake flour, AP flour, etc.):

http://www.ochef.com/21.htm

Above also includes British and non-American names for flour. icon_smile.gif

Choosing flour for baking:
(An article that has photos of most major brand flour products.)

http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/articles/choosing-flour-for-baking.aspx

HTH




Thanks Jan H. I really appreciate this. I don't have any "baking" books and I'm not sure which one to buy. So this helps me Tremediously... icon_lol.gif

2sweetcookies Posted 8 Jul 2007 , 4:01pm

I agree I will always use softasilk in all my cakes.

Has anyone tried the devils food or vanilla cake off the back of the box?

majormichel Posted 8 Jul 2007 , 5:28pm

I can only find swan cake flour, is that just as good as soft as silk cake flour

RRGibson Posted 8 Jul 2007 , 5:37pm

I'm also a scratch baker and I've always uses Swans. You guys are making me want to try this Softasilk now!

GatuPR Posted 9 Jul 2007 , 4:39pm

I have used Swans many times, so I decided to look around for Softasilk in several stores and found it at Super Target for $1.89/box.

steplite Posted 9 Jul 2007 , 7:58pm

I get it at Super Walmart for about the same price.(1.87) It's always been cheaper than Swandown. But It's so much better. I pick up my Watkins Vanilla there also. Once you use Softasilk, you won't want to use Swansdown again.

ShaunaCann Posted 9 Jul 2007 , 8:07pm

I have always just used regular flour so thank you for the heads up. I will add it to my growing list of flours and only use it in my cakes if it makes them that much better. I can't wait to try it.

rcs Posted 9 Jul 2007 , 8:24pm

Would it make much of a difference if you used it in place of regular flour in an extender recipe using a mix?

melysa Posted 9 Jul 2007 , 8:35pm

rcs, you can use one cup plus two tb to replace one cup of all purpose flour.

rcs Posted 9 Jul 2007 , 9:45pm

Thanks, I just bought some SoftasSilk flour and I think I'll give it a try with the extender recipe!!!

steplite Posted 10 Jul 2007 , 3:54am

I always use softasilk in my extender recipe. I never use regular flour.

apclassicwed Posted 16 Jul 2007 , 7:21pm

That's why I (heart) this board---I'm a Swans Down user, and was wondering why my cake crumb is still so coarse. I will try Softassilk with my next cake and hope for great results. Thanks !!

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