Taller Cakes

Decorating By caketease Updated 29 Jul 2008 , 1:13am by bobhope

caketease Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 2:51am
post #1 of 25

Hello everybody,

I am struggling with the height of my cakes. To me they just look like some cakes that were baked at home (before filling and frosting). My cakes never rise to the edge of the cake pans and they never rise over the edge. What can I do to have taller cakes? I don't like to fill my cakes because when they are cut they look like pancakes with filling. BTW, I use box cake mix and I follow the instruction to the "T". Should I try a different temperature? Should I add something to the cakes to help them rise? My cakes are, in my opinion, are nice, on the outside (when filled and iced), but I think that they would be even nicer if I could have taller cakes. HELP ME PLEASE!!! icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gif

Thank you all in advance.

24 replies
8Tracie8 Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 2:58am
post #2 of 25

Have you tried Wilton's bake even strips? I have tried them on my 8" rounds.... would split a cake mix between 2 pans and come out with a 3 1/2" tall cake. I've also heard that you can use a flower nail in the center of your pan.

indydebi Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 3:08am
post #3 of 25

how many mixes or how much batter are you using in what pan sizes?

caketease Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 3:09am
post #4 of 25

No, I haven't tried the strips. I thought that they were only for helping the cakes cook evenly. I didn't know that they would help the height of the cakes. I will try the strips. I have used the flower nail and it did help the cake cook evenly. At this point, i am willing to do anything that will help. icon_redface.gif

Thank you.

caketease Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 3:12am
post #5 of 25

I use 1 mix and split between 2 8" ronud pans but I am not getting the same result as 8Tracie8. Should I add an additional egg?

indydebi Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 3:25am
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by caketease

No, I haven't tried the strips. I thought that they were only for helping the cakes cook evenly. I didn't know that they would help the height of the cakes. Thank you.




The science behind the baking: The reason the baking strips help reduce doming is because they cause the cake to bake more evenly.

Metal is a conductor of heat. THe batter next to the metal will heat up and bake faster than the batter in the middle of the pan. Once the cake on the outer perimeter is baked, then the cake is set and not flexible. Because the cake has baked faster on the outer perimeter, the cake has not had a chance to rise to it's full potential, thus resulting in outer edges that are one to one-and-a-half inches tall.

In the meantime, the batter in the center is still baking and expanding, but since the sides of the cake have already set, then the cake has nowhere to go but up, thus creating the doming effect. The center of the cake is potentially 3 inches high or more.

The baking strips, when wet in cold water, help keep the metal pan a little cooler. Therefore the outer edge of the cake is not baking a lot faster than the center of the cake. The batter temperature on the outer edges is roughly the same as the batter temp in the middle of the cake. So the cake is baking at an even rate .... the sides are not baking and setting faster than the center of the cake ....the cake is rising at an even rate .... Thus even baking AND a nice side effect is reduced doming.

smbegg Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 3:31am
post #7 of 25

If you want tall cakes, you have to over fill the pans. indydeby just posted a thread on this and showed a picture of what her cakes look like. I fill mine a little under 3/4 of the way. They rise above the pan, but don't spill over.

Add bake even strips, and you'll be in business.

Stephanie

adobewife Posted 8 Jun 2007 , 3:32am
post #8 of 25

You need more cake mix. To fill an 8" cake pan you need 3 1/2 cups batter for one 2" layer. So for a 2 layer cake which is what most cakes are, you will need 2 mixes. 1 mix makes about 5 cups. You can fill an 8" pan up to 2/3rd full. I hope this helps. For an 8" I don't use a flower nail(only 10" or up), but baking strips are the best.

caketease Posted 10 Jun 2007 , 2:33am
post #9 of 25

Thanks everybody. I tried the baking strips and they worked beautifully. icon_lol.gif

maimai16 Posted 18 Apr 2008 , 2:37pm
post #10 of 25

others say that i can use a wet kitchen towel as an alternative for baking strips. i'm about to try it tomorrow and im just wondering do i need to adjust the baking time and/or temperature?help!

plbennett_8 Posted 18 Apr 2008 , 2:48pm
post #11 of 25

Also, the WASC and Cake Mix Extender here in the recipe section work Really well icon_biggrin.gif

kelsiedelizzle Posted 29 May 2008 , 7:56pm
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by smbegg

If you want tall cakes, you have to over fill the pans. indydeby just posted a thread on this and showed a picture of what her cakes look like. I fill mine a little under 3/4 of the way. They rise above the pan, but don't spill over.

Add bake even strips, and you'll be in business.

Stephanie




Do you have a link?

2txmedics Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 4:14am
post #13 of 25

I use Duncan Hines, my instructor said they rise better than betty crocker or any other brand...and I also use the baking strips, that helps also, and I also cook at a lower setting at first like she told us.

hope this helps!!! Good Luck.

leah_s Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 10:41am
post #14 of 25

It reaslly just sounds like you're not using enough batter.

2txmedics Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 12:49pm
post #15 of 25

Ok, I use baking strips, my question is this...I seem to be losing the metal pins that come with them. Ive looked in stores, including Michaels and Hobby Lobby for them and cant find them.

Ive tried hardware departments also in stores like Walmart...any suggestions???

THANKS!!!

missmeg Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 1:31pm
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2txmedics

Ok, I use baking strips, my question is this...I seem to be losing the metal pins that come with them. Ive looked in stores, including Michaels and Hobby Lobby for them and cant find them.

Ive tried hardware departments also in stores like Walmart...any suggestions???

THANKS!!!



Office supply binder clips - the black ones. They work beautifully, and you don't stick your fingers in the pin ends. I use the large and X-large sizes.

leah_s Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 1:31pm
post #17 of 25

They are called T pins. Sewing stores, and craft stores have them. I'm sure WalMart has them.

plbennett_8 Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 1:34pm
post #18 of 25

Those are simply bent "T" pins... You should be able to find them in the sewing section. I have heard of people also using binder clips.

HTH,
Pat

2txmedics Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 2:05pm
post #19 of 25

thanks a bunch....I thought I woudlnt be able to use my strips again...

born2bake Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:13pm
post #20 of 25

I just bought my 3rd set of baking strips . . . . . LOVE them, never bake a cake without them. However, the first thing I do when I buy a new set of baking strips is throw away the pins that comes with them and use black binder clips you can get at an office supply store. I usually use 3-4 around the pan and it holds the strips in place much better than the pins.

B2B

jennifer7777 Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 7:09pm
post #21 of 25

Great idea to use the binder clips...I don't really like the T pins. Maybe now I might use my strips more. But really, I've found that using more batter and baking at 325 really yields me excellent results. My cakes rise high and level.
If I use mix I'll use 1 box for a 6" round. Other than that, I automatically use 1 mix or more PER PAN.
Here's my general breakdown:
6" round: 1 mix for 2 pans
8-9" round: 2 mixes (which comes out to 1 mix per pan)
10" round: 3 mixes (divide into pans evenly, which is 1 1/2 mix per pan)
7x11 sheet: 1 mix
9x13 sheet: 2 mixes
11x15: 3 mixes
12x18: 4 mixes

To me it seems like there used to be more batter to these boxes!
When I make a scratch cake, if the cake already yields enough for 3 layers, I'll just make 2 full layers. Otherwise, I double the recipe to be able to have more batter and use the leftovers for cupcakes.

clarasmommy Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 7:16pm
post #22 of 25

I'm new... I've never heard of baking strips. What are they, and how do you use em?

kristina67 Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 12:39am
post #23 of 25

The binder clips are a good idea. I just use metal paper clips and they work just fine. I was desperate one day and tried them. Walaa. Just another idea.

bobhope Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 1:05am
post #24 of 25

yup!baking strips is the way to go..i have had this problem before until i came across indydebi's thread(i would have to say thanks again indydebi thumbs_up.gif ) discussing the science of baking & even baking strips. i tried it & they work wonderfully. just like what smbegg said, i fill my pan almost 3/4 of the way, the cake comes out even & taller/higher than the pan w/o spilling.. thumbs_up.gif ..try it you'll love it thumbs_up.gif

bobbie

bobhope Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 1:13am
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarasmommy

I'm new... I've never heard of baking strips. What are they, and how do you use em?




Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi


The science behind the baking: The reason the baking strips help reduce doming is because they cause the cake to bake more evenly.

Metal is a conductor of heat. THe batter next to the metal will heat up and bake faster than the batter in the middle of the pan. Once the cake on the outer perimeter is baked, then the cake is set and not flexible. Because the cake has baked faster on the outer perimeter, the cake has not had a chance to rise to it's full potential, thus resulting in outer edges that are one to one-and-a-half inches tall.

In the meantime, the batter in the center is still baking and expanding, but since the sides of the cake have already set, then the cake has nowhere to go but up, thus creating the doming effect. The center of the cake is potentially 3 inches high or more.

The baking strips, when wet in cold water, help keep the metal pan a little cooler. Therefore the outer edge of the cake is not baking a lot faster than the center of the cake. The batter temperature on the outer edges is roughly the same as the batter temp in the middle of the cake. So the cake is baking at an even rate .... the sides are not baking and setting faster than the center of the cake ....the cake is rising at an even rate .... Thus even baking AND a nice side effect is reduced doming.




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