Kristy Posted 28 May 2005 , 6:00pm
post #1 of

my 2nd cake has been destroyed. i greased and floured that dang pan so good and i let it sit and flipped it and half of the cake came out all broken! I dont know what else to do. I've now wasted 4 sticks of butter, a dozen eggs, and 4 cake mixes. This cake is a gift, so i'm not getting paid for it either! icon_cry.gificon_cry.gif

36 replies
magentaa23 Posted 28 May 2005 , 6:02pm
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ok iv destroyed plenty of cakes and i even piece cake together to make up a whole sheet.... u can bluff it with ur icing.... and noone will even know icon_smile.gif... just try to get ur cake frozen and ur icing on the thinnerside.... and ice as normal.. chances are noone will notice.. or care icon_smile.gif

magentaa23 Posted 28 May 2005 , 6:06pm
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oo and the nerxt cake u bake.. try to use a spray on coating... i just use spray canola and my cakes pop right out.. too much work to flour and grease icon_razz.gif

Kam Posted 28 May 2005 , 6:19pm
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kristy, I feel for you. I have ruined cakes before too! I have cakes that fall apart but i just piece them together and frost them. The cakes are moist enough to stick together and when it is cut no one ever knows anyways! try getting parchment paper for the bottom of you cake pans. I use parchment and would never go back to just spraying the pan. I hope things turn out for you.

peg818 Posted 28 May 2005 , 6:27pm
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i know alot of people say this is a no-no, but i line the bottom of my pans with waxed paper. And the cake just pops right out of the pan and all i have to do is peal the paper off.

charlieinMO Posted 28 May 2005 , 6:34pm
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Oh, I am so sorry that happened to you. I know it is very frustrating!! Hope your day gets better. I too use the parchment paper. I grease the pan, then put the paper down and then grease the paper. May be over kill but don't fix it if it ain't broke right?!!? Good luck and I hope things turn around for you!!

Charlotte

veejaytx Posted 29 May 2005 , 3:00am
post #7 of

I don't use the paper pan liners, I make my own "release" coating with equal parts Crisco, veg. oil and flour, depending on how much you will be using, (mix up with your mixer but don't whip it), it goes a long way, keeps well without refrigeration, and is inexpensive to make...works well, my cakes don't stick! Janice

crp7 Posted 29 May 2005 , 3:19am
post #8 of

Kristy,

I know it is frustrating. I have that happen, too.

I just wanted to add that the cakes that fell apart do not have to be wasted. You can also make cake bites. They have been discussed on this site before. Here is a recipe provided by Cookieman. You can substitute milk or coffeemate for the amaretto or add whatever ingedients appeal to you.

I went through and found the other thread, below is a quote from Cookieman:

I added the amaretto to the crumbled pieces of leftover chocolate cake I had on hand. I just winged the recipe from what I remembered of other recipes I have tried. In a bowl, I crumbled up about a cup-and-a-half of cake, mixed in a couple of tablespoons of confectioners' sugar, a healthy shot of amaretto, and some chopped almonds. I then mixed the whole thing with my very clean hands until it held together. The trick is to not let the mixture get overly moist, but not have it be dry and crumbly either. I then took a tablespoon cookie scoop and made balls out of the mixture. I let them dry out for a while on a parchement-lined cookie sheet (I let them dry for only about an hour, but idealy it should longer; even overnight) and then proceeded to dip them in melted chocolate candy melts. ( I made my own dipping fork by removing the two middle tines from a four-tined plastic spoon.) Then, back to the parchment-lined cookie sheet and into the freezer for 5 minutes to harden the chocolate shell. There you have it: chocolate-covered amaretto balls!


Cindy

ntertayneme Posted 29 May 2005 , 3:20am
post #9 of

I also use the Crisco, flour, oil mixture... I have mine in a squirt bottle I bought from Walmar ... I squirt some down into my pan then I take a pastry brush and spread it all around .. all of my cakes have just popped right out with this ... and I just did 2 four tier wedding cakes using this ..everyone came out just fine icon_smile.gif

kakabekabunny Posted 29 May 2005 , 3:37am

Oh, Kristy, I know how frustrating it can be when things go wrong with our cakes. I'm sure with all the advice you're getting, it will turn out great! I do the same as peg818. I've used wax paper for years & have never had a cake stick to the pan. (I use Pam spray under the wax paper). I don't know why they say not to use it....it works for me & is cheap! Good luck with your cake.

Lisa Posted 29 May 2005 , 3:38am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristy

my 2nd cake has been destroyed. i greased and floured that dang pan so good and i let it sit and flipped it and half of the cake came out all broken! I dont know what else to do. I've now wasted 4 sticks of butter, a dozen eggs, and 4 cake mixes. This cake is a gift, so i'm not getting paid for it either! icon_cry.gificon_cry.gif




So sorry! I've heard that it's the flour that keeps the cake from sticking and not the grease so you're only supposed to grease lightly...enough to get the flour to stick. Too much grease can actually cause the cake to stick. Not sure if this is true but it's the advice I follow and it works for me. Anyone know if there is any truth to this?

Mjmil7 Posted 29 May 2005 , 3:54am

I'm another one that uses wax paper. I spray the bottom and sides of the pan, place the wax paper down and then I flour the sides of my pan. This has always worked for me too and wax paper is not as expensive as the parchment paper. Hopefully, you'll have better luck on your next cake. So sorry about your cake. Janice

Kristy Posted 30 May 2005 , 2:09pm

thanks everyone for the great tips! Needless to say, i made lots of cake balls, which were also a hit! The cake turned out ok, i was too embarrassed to take pictures of it though, but the silver lining was that i found a new yummy treat!

~Kristy

stephanie214 Posted 8 Jun 2005 , 12:05am

Hi Kristy,

Cake Release by Wilton is the best, haven't had a cake to stick since I started using it. thumbs_up.gif

peacockplace Posted 8 Jun 2005 , 12:12am

Lisa, pretty sure that's not true. I slather on the crisco... super thick. That's all I use and they don't stick. It makes them taste extra yummy.... but doesn't do great things for the waistline!

Lisa Posted 8 Jun 2005 , 12:32am

That settles it then...grease away!

traci Posted 8 Jun 2005 , 1:14am

I also use the Wilton Cake release and find that my cakes come out perfect everytime! However, I do feel for you...I had many broken cakes before I started using it! If it is not that bad and since it is a freebie...I would probably try to fix it with icing! icon_wink.gif
traci

Kristy Posted 8 Jun 2005 , 4:47pm

Thanks for all the great suggestions. I made another 16" cake for a party last weekend and i sprayed it and floured the sides, then i put wax paper down and sprayed more(I wasn't taking any chances)! The cake came out BEAUTIFULLY. I was so happy I called my mom to tell her LOL.

Pictures will be coming soon of the cake.....i'm a little computer-defunct.

I appreciate all of your help!!!

~Kristy

mjones17 Posted 8 Jun 2005 , 5:13pm

This is prob. a dumb question but how do you get the wax paper not to be bumpy? If it is bumpy wont it bake the cake like that?

Kristy Posted 8 Jun 2005 , 7:13pm

Since the pan was so big, i had to use 2 strips of wax paper. I just sprayed the bottom of the pan, then put the wax paper down and smoothed it out, and i even sprayed the overlapping part of the paper together and pressed it all down. Then i sprayed the paper before pouring the batter. It really stayed flat by itself, but i just pressed it down in the pan to make sure.

rena Posted 12 Jun 2005 , 2:43pm

I use Baker's Joy on my cake pans. Not one of my cakes has stuck with this product. Better luck on your next cake.
Rena

ntertayneme Posted 12 Jun 2005 , 2:58pm

I see where a lot of you say you "spray" your pans... I USE to do this, but I don't any longer.. .I got crusty edges and would have to cut them off the cakes everytime .. A lady that use to own a bakery told me that it was the cooking spray causing this and to use shortening and flour to coat my pans... which I do now all the time .. I make my own, I mean, why pay a fortune for Wilton's ($3.69 a bottle) when you can make it at a fraction of the cost... right?? lol .. I've had no cakes stick with my own coating I made and use on pans for my cakes ... I will never use cooking spray again .. I just do not like the crusty edges it makes ... just my choice though icon_smile.gif

SquirrellyCakes Posted 19 Jun 2005 , 5:21am
Quote:
Originally Posted by peg818

i know alot of people say this is a no-no, but i line the bottom of my pans with waxed paper. And the cake just pops right out of the pan and all i have to do is peal the paper off.



Haha, you know Peg, the only time I have ever had a cake stick to a pan has been with cake mix cakes, which is likely a good part of the reason why I don't like them. Anyway, now, whenever I have to make a cake mix cake, I always grease and flour my pan as always and then trace out the bottom of the cake on waxed paper, cut the paper inside the trace line and line the darn cake pan. I have never had another broken cake mix cake.
I don't understand why people are so against using waxed paper for this purpose. Honestly, for many years this was all we had and all we used. Now folks use parchment paper because it is coated with silicone and is said to not have any moisture issues the way that waxed paper can under certain conditions. Also parchment can be used to bake cookies on, while waxed paper cannot or it will burn. However it can be used to line the bottom of a cake pan, it is cheaper to use and it works very well.
One of the main reasons for cake splitting when coming out of the pan is either they were not cooked enough or were not cooled enough in the pan.
I still use good old Crisco shortening and flour to prepare my pans and it still works well for me.
I never take a cake out of the pan before 10 or 15 minutes have passed, for the really larger cakes, I let them cool in the pan for 20 minutes. For 3D pans, 25 or even 30 minutes. They don't stick because of the increased cooling time either. They would stick if left longer or left to cool completely.
Anyway, just my opinion, which happens to agree with yours, haha!
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

SquirrellyCakes Posted 19 Jun 2005 , 5:30am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntertayneme

I see where a lot of you say you "spray" your pans... I USE to do this, but I don't any longer.. .I got crusty edges and would have to cut them off the cakes everytime .. A lady that use to own a bakery told me that it was the cooking spray causing this and to use shortening and flour to coat my pans... which I do now all the time .. I make my own, I mean, why pay a fortune for Wilton's ($3.69 a bottle) when you can make it at a fraction of the cost... right?? lol .. I've had no cakes stick with my own coating I made and use on pans for my cakes ... I will never use cooking spray again .. I just do not like the crusty edges it makes ... just my choice though icon_smile.gif



This is true with Pam, the regular Pam, I have not tried the product they make for cake pans, though.
It is because of what this spray consists of. Other things that will cause issues are greasing a pan with butter or margarine. This is because the burning temperature of these items is much lower than that of shortening. Also, butter and margarine re-absorb back into the cake and can cause sticking issues.
I once made the mistake of using Pam on loaf tins, when I was making various loaves for a dessert tray. The edges got crunchy and hard and I would never use it again.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

SquirrellyCakes Posted 19 Jun 2005 , 5:35am
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisa

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristy

my 2nd cake has been destroyed. i greased and floured that dang pan so good and i let it sit and flipped it and half of the cake came out all broken! I dont know what else to do. I've now wasted 4 sticks of butter, a dozen eggs, and 4 cake mixes. This cake is a gift, so i'm not getting paid for it either! icon_cry.gificon_cry.gif



So sorry! I've heard that it's the flour that keeps the cake from sticking and not the grease so you're only supposed to grease lightly...enough to get the flour to stick. Too much grease can actually cause the cake to stick. Not sure if this is true but it's the advice I follow and it works for me. Anyone know if there is any truth to this?



Well actually, it can if the flour doesn't get well absorbed into the Crisco. What happens is it is so thick that it actually becomes almost an ingredient and can absorb back into the cake. But you would really have to put it on awfully thick for this to be an issue. Too little can cause the cake to stick too.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

SquirrellyCakes Posted 19 Jun 2005 , 5:44am

I know a lot of bakers, new ones in particular, use Baker's Joy or Wilton's Cake Release or those types of products. That is fine, if they don't mind spending the money and it makes them feel more secure and they are happy with the outcome, hey, whatever works for you.
Just my opinion, but honestly, I would rather spend my money on cake toys for the amount of money I would go through with these sprays. I also prefer just to use good old Crisco and flour rather than mixing up my own cake release version, but then, you know, you get set in your ways, haha!
One thing, for a really detailed character pan or an awkward large pan, using a pastry brush to get that Crisco in all the nooks and crannies, works a lot faster. Sometimes I then go over the greased pan with a plastic baggie on my hand to remove any excess before putting the flour into the pan.
Another thing, I think for a large pan like the subject matter, I would go with parchment because it is much larger and you wouldn't have to patch it. Also, because it is coated with silicone, I cannot see the need to grease it for this purpose either. You also do not need to grease waxed paper. Only the pan greased and floured, I wouldn't bother greasing the parchment, it is already non-stick because of the silicone treatment and your waxed paper is waxed so it won't stick either. There are certain cakes that you have to grease the parchment paper for, but this would be very specific cakes and will be advised in the directions.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

jscakes Posted 19 Jun 2005 , 2:01pm

LOL! Squirrelly Cakes ...when you mentioned the baggie on your hand it gave me a chuckle!! Mom would tell us girls to use our hands to grease a pan... we never really liked the feel of that, back then it was "lard"! I used the baggie method for years after I moved out until I broke down and bought a pastry brush!!!
icon_smile.gif Just had to tell you how your comment sparked some memories!

SquirrellyCakes Posted 20 Jun 2005 , 4:10am

Heehee, a baggie was a step up from waxed paper, haha! Funny thing is I use the pastry brush but on some pans with tons of identations, I use the old baggie after the pastry brush.
Haha, lard, well I still use lard for pies. Pretty soon I won't be able to as Canada is in the process of banning all trans fats.
Haha, yes, things like that do trigger memories, don't they?
I too have never liked the feeling of grease on my hands. I don't really like making piecrust for the same reason, all that stuff stuck to your hands.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

debsuewoo Posted 20 Jun 2005 , 2:53pm

I've used all three methods (greasing and flouring, lining the bottom, and cake release), but I have found cake release to work the best for me. Also, I don't turn my cake out unless I have the cooling rack placed on top of the pan first. My problem comes when I torte the cake and go to move the top layer and it falls apart in my hands. I bought one of those flexible cutting boards and am going to try to slip it between the layers before I lift the layer.

Debbi

SquirrellyCakes Posted 20 Jun 2005 , 5:59pm

This is a common problem and likely why a lot of folks either freeze the cake before torting or torte, slide a board in and freeze. It is more of an issue when a cake is larger than 9 inches.
Many folks have success with sliding a same sized board in after the cake is torted, and sliding it back off the board when they are replacing it. I must admit that for the larger sheet pans, I freeze this torted top layer until I am ready to replace it and it is easier to handle frozen.
Also, torting a cake the next day once it has had more of a chance to set an firm up, helps.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

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