honeyscakes Posted 13 Jun 2006 , 10:36pm
post #1 of

hi there,
i always use from scratch recipe for any cake that I make,but sometimes...my cake gets dry,why is that?i use either the wilton yellow cake recipe or the dede wilson recipe.
help?recipes ?please!!!
honeycakes.

32 replies
JoAnnB Posted 13 Jun 2006 , 10:56pm
post #2 of

be sure your are not overbaking the cake, and try wrapping the still-warm cake in plastic wrap and freezing. The warmth will generate some condensation that can moisten the cake.

It that fails, you can try another recipe, or use a simple syrup.

Rodneyck Posted 13 Jun 2006 , 11:22pm
post #3 of

Wrapping your cakes will make them moist, but it also changes the texture and makes them more spongy. This may be fine for some cakes, but when you want a light, fluffy, airy, cake, then you won't get this.

I bake all my cakes at 325 degrees, and pull them out when there IS cake crumbs on the toothpick, but not wet batter.

Also, most of it depends on the recipe. You need to find one that you really like and stick with it.

winter Posted 13 Jun 2006 , 11:43pm
post #4 of

Try using a timer and take your cake out as soon as its done. You may be over baking. Good Luck icon_smile.gif

leta Posted 13 Jun 2006 , 11:58pm
post #5 of

Best yellow cake recipe I have tried so far is from Toba Garrett's book: The Well Decorated Cake

"Moist Yellow cake" She says the best results are with "Soft as Silk" brand cake flour.

Her recipes are some of the moister ones I have tried. One key ingredient, it seems is buttermilk. I just use the powdered variety. Mix the buttercream powder with the powdered ingredients and add the water when it says to add the liquid. In a pinch you can use regular milk with a tablespoon of lemon juice or vinegar per cup of milk let it curdle a bit.

Really evaluate the amount of fat that is in the recipe. It makes a difference.

That's been my experience thus far, but I'm still open to improvement.

leta Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 12:01am
post #6 of

Woops, double post. Itchy trigger finger.

fearlessbaker Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 12:13am
post #7 of

Honeyscakes, Same problem here. Except for Alice Medrich, I think my cardinal rule will be to pass up recipes that don't have sour cream or butter milk in them and to stay away from those that include sugar syrup. To me , that raises a red flag that the cake itself is going to be dry. Others may not feel this way. One reason for buying Dede's book was because she states that she tried to get the cake mix texture and moistness down. Just not so. I have tried a few cakes from Whimsical Bakehouse with good luck. And Rodney is high on Cook's. I have their baking book and have just ordered their layer cake book. Has anyone tried anything from King Arthur?

jmt1714 Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 2:20am
post #8 of

and use whole milk and real sour cream, etc. fat is a key part of moistness

fearlessbaker Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 2:27am
post #9 of

JMT, Thanx. I am on a quest for White Chocolate Cake recipes. Some only have whole milk without the sour cream. Others, have oil. I am not keen on the oil But recipes with only the milk wouldn't be as moist, right?

karateka Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 2:29am

Do you have a copy of the Cake Bible? I love her cakes. They have never failed me, and she has a white chocolate one in there, too. Check it out!

fearlessbaker Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 2:45am

Yes, I do have it and it's falling apart. Is yours? You mean the white,whisper cake? I want to put the white chocolate cigarellos around it. Can the cake support that with a slather of BC under them. I am a big fan of her Mousseline BC because it doesn't taste like a mouthfull of butter. Have you been to her blog? I would be interested in knowing a few of your other favorite books if it's not too much trouble or time. Thanx

jmt1714 Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 2:49am

what about the oil bothers you?

moist and mouthfeel are key things; moisture is the first thing that hits you but fat is what gives it luciousness - and to your mouth and body, fat is fat is fat. doesn't matter whether oil or butter or whatever. Taste that is conveyed will differ (think of the taste of butter), but a neutral veggie oil will provide fat to carry the other flavors you put in the cake.

karateka Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 2:55am

fearlessbaker-

I confess that I mostly use her recipes. I've only just started trialing others, like Dede Wilson and Collette Peters. Rose's recipes are so reliable that I've never had a reason to try anyone elses. I love her mousseline buttercream, too. I can't figure out why everyone doesn't!! And yes, I meant the white chocolate whisper cake. I think it would work with your cigarillos, you'll have to let us know how it turns out.

As for her blog, I wasn't aware she had one. But now I know, and I'll probably pop in!

fearlessbaker Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 2:57am

JMT, I never thought about why!!! Just my own perception of the fat. It's like someone ordering a huge banana split and a DIET coke to save calories. You are right and so now I will look at it in a different light!

fearlessbaker Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 3:03am

Karateka, I want to use it to make a tiered wedding cake. So, I have to figure all that out. If I think it's too frustrating then I am going to make the one where she put the swans on top with the blueberries.

What does the Asian writing say in your Avatar??

Cheesefairy Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 3:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by fearlessbaker

Has anyone tried anything from King Arthur?



I've used the yellow cake recipe from the King Arthur cookbook. I like it, the yellow cake is a little dense, kind of like a light pound cake. I'm going to try some other yellow cake recipes though to see how they compare.

cakesondemand Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 4:01am
Quote:
Originally Posted by karateka

Do you have a copy of the Cake Bible? I love her cakes. They have never failed me, and she has a white chocolate one in there, too. Check it out!




Ijust made the whisper white choc 2 weeks ago that was my first scratch cake and it was wonderful. I did wrap it while it was still hot and it wasn't to dry. Someone told me a good way to moisten a cake is to spray some sugar water on it I haven't tried that yet.

honeyscakes Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 4:02am

anyone...do you mind sharing a good moist white cake recipe?
thanks
honeycakes.

alimonkey Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 4:25am

I've tried the elegant white cake from the King Arthur flour cookbook. It was OK, but I preferred a doctored mix at that point. Here's a link to one I posted a while back. It's my new favorite.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-24352-pastry.html+queen

jmt1714 Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 10:50am

I have heard of dousing a cake with simple syrup, but not just sugar water. interesting.

Rodneyck Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 12:54pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmt1714

I have heard of dousing a cake with simple syrup, but not just sugar water. interesting.




Actually, simple syrup is sugar water, one part water to one part sugar boiled for 1 minute, then cooled before flavorings, if any, are added.

angelas2babies Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 12:57pm

I really like "A Better White Cake" recipe from the recipe section here. It's very good!!!

Angie

Naty Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 5:01pm

Hi, Just wanted to share my opinion. The best yellow cake I have made is the "Yellow Cake Layers" from Gourmet.com (I posted it before here on CC). It is fluffy and light like a cake mix.

I do make a "denser" butter cake (not as dense as a pound cake though), in which I add a simple syrup to it. I brush the syrup liberally over the top then wrap it good in seran wrap the let it sit overnight till the next day when I decorate it. I also bake at 325. My cakes never come out dry.

Regards,
Naty

Naty Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 5:02pm

Hi, Just wanted to share my opinion. The best yellow cake I have made is the "Yellow Cake Layers" from Gourmet.com (I posted it before here on CC). It is fluffy and light like a cake mix.

I do make a "denser" butter cake (not as dense as a pound cake though), in which I add a simple syrup to it. I brush the syrup liberally over the top then wrap it good in seran wrap the let it sit overnight till the next day when I decorate it. I also bake at 325. My cakes never come out dry.

Regards,
Naty

angelas2babies Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 5:12pm

Naty, would you mind posting it again, or telling me where to look for it, because it is not the gourmet site. They have a "yellow cake", but I'm not sure if that is the right one.

THANK YOU!!!
Angie

fearlessbaker Posted 14 Jun 2006 , 5:59pm

Thanks Naty

Naty Posted 16 Jun 2006 , 12:37am
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelas2babies

Naty, would you mind posting it again, or telling me where to look for it, because it is not the gourmet site. They have a "yellow cake", but I'm not sure if that is the right one.

THANK YOU!!!
Angie




Hi Angie, here's the recipe.

Great American Cakes
by Barbara Kafka
Gourmet December 1987

Yellow Cake Layers
This is probably America's favorite layer for any kind of cake;
it is what the cake-mix people try to imitate and never get right.

Makes two 8-inch layers

2 1/4 cups sifted cake flour
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
1 1/2 sticks (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, softened
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 large eggs at room temperature
3/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Into a bowl sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. In a large bowl with an electric mixer cream the butter, add sugar gradually, beating, and beat the mixture until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Stir in the flour mixture and the milk alternately in batches, beginning and ending with dry ingredients, add the vanilla, and beat the batter until it is smooth. Divide the batter between 2 lightly greased and floured 8-by-1 1/2-inch round cake pans, smoothing the top, rap each pan on a hard surface twice to expel any air bubbles, and bake the layers in the middle of a preheated 350-degree F. oven for 25 to 35 minutes, or until a tester inserted in center comes out clean and the layers pull away slightly from the sides of the pans. Let the layers cool in the pans on a rack for 8 minutes, run a thin knife around the edge of each pan, and invert the layers onto the racks. Let the layers cool completely.

Let me know how it turns out.

Regards,
Naty

beachcakes Posted 16 Jun 2006 , 12:48am

Mmm that's my favorite yellow cake too! Last time I made it, i put some mini chocolate chips in the batter...

Naty Posted 17 Jun 2006 , 1:09pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachcakes

Mmm that's my favorite yellow cake too! Last time I made it, i put some mini chocolate chips in the batter...




Oh!! Tell me more...how did it come out? I have not tried adding anything else to the recipe. Did the chocolate chips sink? Have you made it entirely chocolate?
I found a recipe for a similar cake but with chocolate, but haven't tried it yet. I just love this yellow cake...it is fluffy and light...just right.
If you like, I can post the recipe for the chocolate one and if you get to make it, would you mind telling me how it turns out?
I am banned from baking for awhile (I get too crazy and irritable and my hubby told me to stop baking if I get like that...LOL so I will lay-low for awhile).

Thanks,
Naty

Rodneyck Posted 17 Jun 2006 , 3:06pm

Two tips for adding chocolate chips to a recipe are;

1. use mini chips, less weight so they tend not to sink to the bottom.

2. For either sized chips, dust in a bit of the flour from your recipe to coat. It helps in preventing the sinkage as well.

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