Foamcore Cake Boards

Decorating By WebDiva Updated 1 Jul 2013 , 2:14am by Jeff_Arnett

WebDiva Posted 8 Jun 2006 , 8:58pm
post #1 of 25

For those of you who use foamcore for you cake boards...is there an easy way to cut them nicely? I bought some and used an x-acto knife and found it difficulty to cut and got very rough edges.

I would prefer not to have to cut them at all (anyone know of a source for this?), but if I have to cut them myself, what is the easiest method?

Thanks.

24 replies
KHalstead Posted 8 Jun 2006 , 9:00pm
post #2 of 25

I use an exacto knife........when I'm cutting squares or rectangles I just slice through the first layer of paper and bend it and it breaks off perfectly......you just have to score it and then it will break off cleanly...it's hard to try to cut all the way through the thickness.

missyek Posted 8 Jun 2006 , 9:02pm
post #3 of 25

I use a utility knife and it has to have a very sharp blade. I know my blade is getting dull when I don't get smooth cuts. You can also score the top of it first, then go all the way through. You just want to try and avoid the stabbing motion.

WebDiva Posted 8 Jun 2006 , 9:18pm
post #4 of 25

Thank you for your responses...yes, I did try and score it using my X-acto knife (which was brand new) and it just did not work out too well. I was just using a regular x-acto knife...similar to this one (but not exactly):

Image

Maybe I should be using something different?

KarenOR Posted 8 Jun 2006 , 10:45pm
post #5 of 25

I just did three last night. I used a utility knife, but I used to cut foam core for architecture projects all the time. You really need to have a SHARP blade. IF you don't, it's going to pull and rip and shred the foam. It could have been the angle you were cutting wasn't quite right for the blade you are using.
After that you can either press really hard, but I suggest using a self healing mat or really thick cardboard underneath it. Or, you can score it and then cut again. You should cut against a metal edge straight edge or ruler for the best results.

sugarspice Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 1:38am
post #6 of 25

I use an Xacto knife and have problems if the blade is dull. Otherwise I use a steady pulling montion-score it, then go deeper and it turns out ok. I also cover the boards in white freezer paper for a smooth finish. It can look ragged at times and if it is covered-it doesn't matter! icon_cool.gif

Misska21 Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 3:00am
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarspice

I also cover the boards in white freezer paper for a smooth finish. It can look ragged at times and if it is covered-it doesn't matter! icon_cool.gif




Maybe I am stupid, but what is white freezer paper?

missyek Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 3:25am
post #8 of 25

You can find Reynold's Freezer Paper at the grocery store in the paper products ailse--near the tin foil. Freezer paper is the stuff that you wrap your meats in that you want to put in a deep freeze, but it is a cheap alternative to fanci foils and it works great for wrapping cake boards!

Misska21 Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 3:46am
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by missyek

You can find Reynold's Freezer Paper at the grocery store in the paper products ailse--near the tin foil. Freezer paper is the stuff that you wrap your meats in that you want to put in a deep freeze, but it is a cheap alternative to fanci foils and it works great for wrapping cake boards!




Oh, ok...I see. Thanks! Love your avatar by the way...Go Legolas! icon_biggrin.gif

SLK Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 3:50am
post #10 of 25

I cut mine with an exacto also, but I'm looking for a tool I saw on tv once.

Don't know what it's called but it's a blade that is attached to a ruller like thing that you can cut circles with.

I think it might be used for scrapbooking or something. Any ever heard of this?

BlakesCakes Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 4:15am
post #11 of 25

I bought a "hot knife" for cutting foamcore. It's called the Creative Hot Marks Tool Kit--here's a link at Joann.com that shows it (on sale!)--

http://joann.com/catalog.jhtml?CATID=95443&PRODID=137225&source=search

It's essentially a heated x-acto knife--with other little parts that you may or may not want or use. I got it in the craft section at WalMart and I've seen them at Joann and Michaels. It does a phenomenal job and goes through the entire board like cutting butter. I couldn't cut the foamcore--especially in odd shapes--without it. Best non-cake cake item I've ever purchased.
thumbs_up.gif
Rae

Loucinda Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 1:13pm
post #12 of 25

How thick of a foamcore board do you use? I bought one at Michaels last week, used it yesterday, and when I lifted the cake to put it in the box, it cracked. icon_mad.gif (I have always used plywood - this was my first time using the foamcore)

dolcesunshine20 Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 1:18pm
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcrew

How thick of a foamcore board do you use? I bought one at Michaels last week, used it yesterday, and when I lifted the cake to put it in the box, it cracked. icon_mad.gif (I have always used plywood - this was my first time using the foamcore)




I use the sheets of foamcore from Michael's too, and to be on the safe side I always layer them by at least two or three depending on the size of my cake.

KHalstead Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 1:23pm
post #14 of 25

sometimes I double the foam core........one sheet it usually perfect for a half sheet cake I score the center and fold the board in half and then cover the edge with ribbon! Nice and sturdy......of course I still hold the cake from the bottom....not by the sides of the board. But I haven't ever had any issues with it not supporting the weight and I usually make double layers on the half sheet cakes.

KHalstead Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 1:23pm
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

I bought a "hot knife" for cutting foamcore. It's called the Creative Hot Marks Tool Kit--here's a link at Joann.com that shows it (on sale!)--

http://joann.com/catalog.jhtml?CATID=95443&PRODID=137225&source=search

It's essentially a heated x-acto knife--with other little parts that you may or may not want or use. I got it in the craft section at WalMart and I've seen them at Joann and Michaels. It does a phenomenal job and goes through the entire board like cutting butter. I couldn't cut the foamcore--especially in odd shapes--without it. Best non-cake cake item I've ever purchased.
thumbs_up.gif
Rae




how much does it cost????????????

surfergina Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 1:28pm
post #16 of 25

How thick of the foamcore do you use, to prevent from cracking or splitting in half? Do you keep it or let your customer have it? I'm just wondering since I'm opening my own shop this Fall.

Loucinda Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 2:39pm
post #17 of 25

Well, there is my problem....I didn't double the board, I just used the one layer. It was a 1/4 sheet cake, got one crack in it. (the customer did not mind, it was very small) I will know to double the board from now on. Thanks ladies!

missyek Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 3:01pm
post #18 of 25

I just buy the 1/2" thick instead of doubling up on the 3/16" thick. The thing will not bend at all!

Loucinda Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 3:08pm
post #19 of 25

I will check on the thicknesses of the boards there now - never looked to see if they had anything thicker than the 3/8ths. icon_confused.gif

WebDiva Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 4:12pm
post #20 of 25

I think I also bought the 1/2" thickness.

I think I'm going to try the hot knife that Rae suggested...I'm thinking that will make it much easier...I really had a hard time cutting that board...the edges looked like a mess when I was done!

Thanks for your help.

Reecie Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 4:16pm
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcrew

How thick of a foamcore board do you use? I bought one at Michaels last week, used it yesterday, and when I lifted the cake to put it in the box, it cracked. icon_mad.gif (I have always used plywood - this was my first time using the foamcore)




I think the ones from Michaels are only 1/4 inch thick. I use the ones from Hobby Lobby. They sell them 1/2 inch and they are really sturdy.

PinkPanther Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 4:45pm
post #22 of 25

I would also like to know if you guys keep the boards or let your customers have them. I'm considering switching to foam core instead of the regular cake boards. icon_smile.gif

P.S. Misska21 I love your avatar! icon_cry.gif

WebDiva Posted 9 Jun 2006 , 6:39pm
post #23 of 25

I personally let them keep them. If you are concerned about cost, I'd say factor it into your prices.

okstout4 Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 6:50pm
post #24 of 25

AI know this is an old post, but I just read other forums where they said they used a drywall circle cutter to cut the foamboards. :)

Jeff_Arnett Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 2:14am
post #25 of 25

I use the 1/4 inch foam core for all my cake boards that will be used in a stacked tiered cake. 

 

I cut them perfectly in any size up to 16 inches using a Lion-EV-R-Round circle cutter that I bought from www.misterart.com.   The cutter won't cut all the way through on one side, but it's easy.  The cutter itself has a central pin with an adjustable arm with the blade.  Once you set the arm at the cirle width I want, I lay my foamcore on a piece of masonite and push the central pin of the cutter through the foamcore and slightly into the masonite, turn the cutter one full turn, then flip the board over, insent the central pin into the tiny hole it made when pushed through from the other side, the make a complete cut on that side...the whole process might take 30 seconds to cut a perfect round board.  Only real drawback for anyone would be the fact that the circle size scale in is cenitmeters ratther than inches...but all you have to do is multiply your diameter in inches by 2.54 to convert to centimeters. 

 

I ice my cakes with my upside down method, then before flipping, I measure their diameter and cut a circle exactly that size.  Makes for a perfect stacking system.  Once I cut the board out, I use a Foam Werks 1/2 inch drill to cut a 1/2 inch hole in the center of my boards.  I use the impaling method to stack a cake, when I start with a center base with a 1/2 dowel glued into it.  I just then center the hole in the base of the board over the top of the dowel and lower the cake down into position....cakes are always perfectly centered with this method without any measuring required!

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