Cake Lifter - Anyone Tried One Of These?

Decorating By montanakate Updated 16 Apr 2016 , 12:29am by Helen Fletcher

montanakate Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 5:14am
post #1 of 25

I was just surfing a website that had a 10" stainless steel cake lifter advertised for $18.00. It looked like an oversized round spatula that you could use to pick up cakes. I was just wondering if anyone has tried one of these and is it helpful? I always am very nervous when I'm trying to lift my cakes using my long icing spatulas. It always feels like they are going to bend under the weight of the larger cakes not to mention tip over off of them. Do you think this would be a useful tool, it's really not that much but I tell you I've got more of those "really not too much" purchases that I don't even use.
Thanks for any feedback.
kate

24 replies
Rodneyck Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 5:35am
post #2 of 25

I just bought one of these. I had no idea they even had such a thing until I saw one on Williams-Sonoma's website. I ordered it and love it. This one has a beveled edge so it slides easily into the layers with ease or under the whole cake. I was tired of using my oversized spatula and trying to support the rest of the cake that was hanging over the sides with my hands, lol.

bush1 Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 5:53am
post #3 of 25

I have an oversized square one that is about 10 inches wide (I think). It also has a pretty long handle. Works great for lifting cakes and you don't have to worry about them splitting. I would definitely recommend it.

playingwithsugar Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 6:01am
post #4 of 25

I went to the restaurant supply store and bought a metal pizza peel. It cost about half the price you are talking about and works even better, because the handle is longer. My 3-foot handled pizza peel cost me about 9 dollars, with sales tax. I love it!

Theresa icon_smile.gif

DelightsByE Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 2:10pm
post #5 of 25

tmriga you are my hero(ine)! princess.gif

I am getting ready to try and torte a 16" square, and I was at a loss as to what I could use to slide in between without cracking or tearing into a million pieces. Was contemplating using a cardboard.

I am delivering my toddler to grandma's this afternoon and there is a restaurant supply store enroute.

Problem solved!!!!

If there was an emoticon for a smooch, you'd be getting it!

priya Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 2:57pm
post #6 of 25

Where / How do you find a restaurant supply store?

gilson6 Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 3:47pm
post #7 of 25

I have the one from Williams Sonoma. I love it. It is a life saver when I'm slicing my cake for filling and for when I'm lifting a cake from the rack after it has cooled.

DelightsByE Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 4:28pm
post #8 of 25

priya -

if you have one in your area, it should be listed in your yellow pages under "Restaurant Equipment & Supplies" or something similar. OR - you could ask at your favorite local restaurant where they get their supplies.

Rodneyck Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 4:41pm
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by gilson6

I have the one from Williams Sonoma. I love it. It is a life saver when I'm slicing my cake for filling and for when I'm lifting a cake from the rack after it has cooled.




Exactly! I also like the short style handle so I can put my cake with the lifter into the fridge or freezer for a few minutes, if I need to firm up the icing or whatever, like haveing a handle on a cake. icon_lol.gif

Bumps Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 4:46pm
post #10 of 25

I have two that are large round that I use all the time. I think it is great for lifting cakes. I can't even remember where I got mind.

daltonam Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 4:51pm
post #11 of 25

thanks for reminding me that i have a huge spatula thing made for pizzas (bought for taking pizzas out of oven) icon_biggrin.gif i can know put that with the cake supplies

knoxcop1 Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 4:52pm
post #12 of 25

What an awesome idea...and here I've been schlepping around with my big 'ole turner and some cardboard...dang. icon_redface.gif

--Knox--

priya Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 5:34pm
post #13 of 25

Thanks you very much DelightsByE (since I don't know ur name)

I shall try and see how it goes.

playingwithsugar Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 9:18pm
post #14 of 25

Glad I could help! If you do not have a restaurant supply store nearby, ask your local pizzeria if they would order one for you. If you have no pizzeria near you, you can get one by searching "metal pizza peel" in your favorite search engine, or get one from Amazon. Here's a link:


http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0001MRSBG/?tag=cakecentral-20


Theresa icon_smile.gif

montanakate Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 11:03pm
post #15 of 25

Wow, thanks for the responses. I will check out our local restaurant supplier as well to see if they have a better deal. You guys are great!
Kate

playingwithsugar Posted 2 Jun 2006 , 11:13pm
post #16 of 25

One more thing - get a pizza peel with a longer handle - about 3 feet. That way, if the cake is heavy, you can brace the handle in your underarm and maneuver it with both hands.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

rlm5150 Posted 3 Jun 2006 , 1:21am
post #17 of 25

Thanks for that advice ladies. I've now got one on my watch list on Ebay.

oneprimalscream Posted 3 Jun 2006 , 1:30am
post #18 of 25

For those who care, I saw a rather LARGE spatula at the local Dollar Tree here, and when I saw it, my first thought was, "That would be really good for lifting cakes."

Would be good for smaller cakes, up to 8"-10".

ps3884 Posted 3 Jun 2006 , 1:33am
post #19 of 25

I have the Pampered Chef Lift & Serve. I love it!! It's actually two pieces, each half is 6 3/4 x 12 inches. I usually only need to use one piece to lift the layers.

jackie64 Posted 3 Jun 2006 , 2:19am
post #20 of 25

I just received 2 plastic ,heavy plastic ones I ordered them from sweetc . They will be perfect when I want to torte a 1/2 sheet cake with my mother helping me Im not afraid of the cake breaking anymore . I gave around $7.99 a piece for them and I havent used them yet but I know I love them already. icon_smile.gif

mrwarnke Posted 3 Jun 2006 , 2:31am
post #21 of 25

ps3884 - have you ever used the one from Pampered Chef to place tiers on top of one another? It is so hard for me to center the tiers and I thought this might help since you could maybe position it from the center and then place it on the cake below? Just curious.

ps3884 Posted 3 Jun 2006 , 11:35am
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrwarnke

ps3884 - have you ever used the one from Pampered Chef to place tiers on top of one another? It is so hard for me to center the tiers and I thought this might help since you could maybe position it from the center and then place it on the cake below? Just curious.




Wow, where's my mind. icon_confused.gif I hadn't even thought to try to use it to place the tier. I've only used it to lift layers. I'm going to make a small practice cake this weekend, so I will have to try using it to center the tier.

mrwarnke Posted 3 Jun 2006 , 12:32pm
post #23 of 25

let me know how it works out!

Helen Fletcher Posted 16 Apr 2016 , 12:25am
post #24 of 25

I had an upscale wholesale bakery but we also did a lot of wedding cakes.  I have read the comments about cake lifters.  Having had no experience working in a bakery when I started mine, I ended up figuring things out as I went along.

Why is everyone using one cake lifter and hoping the cake doesn't fall off.   See http://pastrieslikeapro.com/2014/05/sour-cream-cheesecake/#.VxGFOcf6cXc for how we managed to transfer our cakes.  I'm sure many of the solutions above work, but use two!

Hope this helps.  

Helen Fletcher Posted 16 Apr 2016 , 12:29am
post #25 of 25

Sorry, I should have mentioned you need to go to the bottom of the blog to see how we lifted our cakes.  

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