Food Safe Wire?

Decorating By KarenOR Updated 20 Oct 2014 , 9:53pm by pastrypet

KarenOR Posted 1 May 2006 , 4:18pm
post #1 of 29

I've seen some cakes that use chocolate transfer decorations and have them leaping off the cake in various ways. You know what I'm talking about?
Anyway, I was wondering if there are food safe wires? What do people use? Thanks.

28 replies
mjones17 Posted 1 May 2006 , 7:59pm
post #2 of 29

bump cause I want to know too...hopefully before Thursday....lol.

Schmoop Posted 1 May 2006 , 8:03pm
post #3 of 29

me too!

reenie Posted 1 May 2006 , 8:07pm
post #4 of 29

I use floral wire that I've washed in hot, soapy water.

NEWTODECORATING Posted 1 May 2006 , 8:31pm
post #5 of 29

My choc transfers I just stick in the icing and they stand on their own, but I THINK if you are placing them on wires you need to stick a straw into the cake first and put the wire in the straw so it never actually comes in contact with the food. Or most recently I have done them on barbecue skewers

leily Posted 1 May 2006 , 11:19pm
post #6 of 29

I use stainless steel wire. I got some from work, but in a pinch bought some at a craft store in the jewlery section. Wash/sanitize well and it is no different than the stainless table/equipment your food is prepared on =)

Leily

Crimsicle Posted 1 May 2006 , 11:52pm
post #7 of 29

Since you bake your cakes in aluminum pans, for the most part, and since copper, carbon steel, tin and stainless steel are also used with food, I'd venture a guess that wires made from any of these substances would be just fine. I wipe mine down with a swipe of everclear just before inserting in the cake.

leily Posted 2 May 2006 , 12:08am
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crimsicle

Since you bake your cakes in aluminum pans, for the most part, and since copper, carbon steel, tin and stainless steel are also used with food, I'd venture a guess that wires made from any of these substances would be just fine. I wipe mine down with a swipe of everclear just before inserting in the cake.




I could see using any of these But carbon steel. There are many different grades of carbon steel. What your knifes are made out of is completely different from some other carbon steel that is not even allowed in food plants that process food. This is just a personal preference though.

Leily

prettycake Posted 2 May 2006 , 12:20am
post #9 of 29

You know who uses wires a lot ? it is Duff, that cake guy in Charm Cakes or Charm City Cakes or something like that.... I used wire for my Butterflies last October, I knew they were safe, but I still wrapped the part that goes into the cake w/ very small pc. of plaztic wrap, just to be safe. No can tell, it's tha part that goes into the cake. icon_smile.gif

Crimsicle Posted 2 May 2006 , 1:33am
post #10 of 29

At the end of the day, each person has got to do what makes them comfortable.

Delynn Posted 2 May 2006 , 1:52am
post #11 of 29

To be on the safe side, wrap the section of the wire that will stick into the cake with Saran Press n Seal by cutting a narrow piece, lay the wire on it near the edge, press down slightly and roll the wire (like rolling carpeting).

Hope this will eliminate any worries.

KarenOR Posted 2 May 2006 , 3:17am
post #12 of 29

Thanks for all the responses. Since I wasn't doing anything that really needed to "fly", I decided to just put some of the palm trees on bamboo skewers thereby eliminating all the wire safety issues. I managed to make palm trees and flamingos and hope that they will stay in tact until I'm ready to do the cake!

SquirrellyCakes Posted 2 May 2006 , 4:48am
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by reenie

I use floral wire that I've washed in hot, soapy water.



Hi reenie, if you mean the green painted florist's wire, the wire is painted with a paint that can have traces of lead and is not considered safe. Florist's tape is also not food safe according to the manufacturer. The wires that silk flowers are on, the plastic coated wires, is also not food safe when exposed.
Carbon steel can rust and there are different grades of it, some more rust resistant than others. It is not all knife quality. I have a wok made of high quality carbon steel that rusts quite easily. Even stainless steel can rust under the right circumstances. Of all the metals, the stainless steel is the safest.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

Pyxxydust Posted 2 May 2006 , 1:16pm
post #14 of 29

I just took a gumpaste flower class with Nicholas Lodge, which was AWESOME! Anyway, we were talking about just what this topic about, cuz we wondered if you could stick the flowers on wires right into the cake. He said not to - because it can definitely rust. He said he was at a wedding where the cake was a $26,000 cake that had gumpaste flowers all over it - and when the bride and groom cut into it - the wires were all rusted so the cake had rust in it. Yuck. Can you imagine paying that much for a rusty cake?! So he said you should use floral spikes (depending on the length of the wire) or like somone else said - use plastic straws and stick the wires in there, or I like the Saran Wrap press n seal idea also.

glory2god Posted 2 May 2006 , 4:42pm
post #15 of 29

i wonder if chinese noodles would be strong enough to hold them. i was told by someone that if i wanted my cake completely edible when using gumpaste flowers to use chinese noodles in place of the wire.

mjones17 Posted 2 May 2006 , 6:14pm
post #16 of 29

I have heard of spagetti noodles being used.

glory2god Posted 2 May 2006 , 7:10pm
post #17 of 29

they are called chinese noodles here and you can purchase them from a health food store. in place of the florist tape you use the green "fruit rollups".

boring Posted 3 May 2006 , 2:21pm
post #18 of 29

You can use spagetti, I have use it before and when making people you can actually use spagettie instead of bamboo sticks or toothpicks, especially of the people are for childrens cakes as the children always eat everything on the cake no matter how much time you spend on making them.

SheilaF Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 2:22am
post #19 of 29

I know this is an old topic, but since there was a link to it..... Doesn't the spagetti get soft with the moisture of the cake and fall over? I'm fairly new to decorating and only do them for friends and family anyway, but I do like to make everything edible as much as possible......

tobycat Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 3:10am
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by glory2god

i wonder if chinese noodles would be strong enough to hold them. i was told by someone that if i wanted my cake completely edible when using gumpaste flowers to use chinese noodles in place of the wire.




Haven't even tried to use flowers like this, and now am completely clueless as to a visual about the chinese noodles icon_confused.gificon_confused.gificon_confused.gif

What/how do you use them?

Sarah

leta Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 5:05am
post #21 of 29

Since my first cake in which I stabbed all the wires right into the cake----no one died---I have a couple methods for using wire:

For a bunch of flowers on the top tier, for example, put a big ball of fondant on top and poke the wires into that.

For sprays, tape the wired flowers together with florist tape, trim the wire bunch and bend into a curve then lay on top of the cake.

Or use royal icing to attach them to a pastillage plaque.

Anyway, the person who eats my gumpaste flowers deserves to die.

leily Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 11:12am
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by leta

Anyway, the person who eats my gumpaste flowers deserves to die.




icon_lol.gificon_surprised.gificon_lol.gificon_surprised.gif

LOLOL I so felt this way after only making 5 flowers myself. Someone is going to be paying big bucks and they better just look at them!

Great laugh to start the day!

Leily

leily Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 11:14am
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SheilaF

I know this is an old topic, but since there was a link to it..... Doesn't the spagetti get soft with the moisture of the cake and fall over? I'm fairly new to decorating and only do them for friends and family anyway, but I do like to make everything edible as much as possible......




In order for spagetti to get soft it needs to be in some Very hot water, not just moisture. Even in a humid room for a few months (yes experience talking here) they don't get soft. I would imagine that you would need the spagetti noodles to be in the cake for quite awhile... and who lets a cake sit around a long time? No one I know of icon_smile.gif

This is all just my illogical thinking... so if anyone does have experience please let me know icon_lol.gif

Leily

Doug Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 11:31am
post #24 of 29

and you can use these things -- flower spikes -- to hold a bundle/bunch of wires together too

(may have to stuff some fondant in them support if not enough wires)
LL

RitzyFritz Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 11:43am
post #25 of 29

Would hard spaghetti pose as a choking hazard...especially for children? Just a newbie here...Thanks!!

Doug Posted 1 Jul 2006 , 11:47am
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by RitzyFritz

Would hard spaghetti pose as a choking hazard...especially for children? Just a newbie here...Thanks!!




not if properly removed....

and if some still stuck to a cookie...."chew, kid, chew!"

(yep, as a kid...hard spaghetti was a "crunchy" snack sometimes)

drlvai Posted 19 Oct 2014 , 10:14pm
post #27 of 29

AWhat about dipping the wire in chocolate first?

cakebaby2 Posted 20 Oct 2014 , 6:01pm
post #28 of 29

safer to use straws or toothpicks

pastrypet Posted 20 Oct 2014 , 9:53pm
post #29 of 29

Dental wire, as used for braces, is safe to use.

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